Category Archives: Pets/Animals

Cat of the Week: Cilantro

By Sharon Wylie, Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable pet — or few — from an area shelter. This week’s beauty is from Crash’s Landing. Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Denyes, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


In honor of Cinco de Mayo 2017, Dr. Jen opted to give all of the ‘newbies’ for the month names of Hispanic origin; we had already had a Cinco (and Dr. Jen is saving Mayo for a white kitty). So, here’s a little bit about Cilantro, one of May’s magnifico kiddos that became a Crash Cat.


Super cute Cilantro is a fun and fabulous fella born in early 2015 who was fortunate enough to cross paths with one of our volunteers. As part of her TNR efforts on the south side of town, the volunteer comes across MANY a cat in need, but thankfully Cilantro was pretty darn healthy, just homeless.


He initially had a difficult time adjusting to shelter life as he didn’t take too kindly to others invading his personal space, but over time he has gotten used to their company. However, we are sure he wouldn’t mind being in a single cat house as long as it is a VERY busy one, probably with a rambunctious kid or two! He can’t wait to chum around with a human that is as energetic and adventurous as he is.


Want to adopt Cilantro? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.

Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

 

Pets of the Week: Missy, Safya & Feisty

By Brooke Hotchkiss, Humane Society of West Michigan


Each week, WKTV features an adoptable furry friend (or few) from various shelters in the Grand Rapids area. This week, we focus on Humane Society of West Michigan, located at 3077 Wilson Dr. NW in Grand Rapids.


Humane Society of West Michigan’s mission is to rescue hurt, abused and abandoned animals and find them a new forever home. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization helps over 8,000 animals annually and is 100% donor-funded by caring individuals and businesses in the community. Additional programs help reduce pet overpopulation, provide assistance to low-income pet owners, behaviorally assess animals and reunite lost pets with their owners.


 

Missy

Missy — Female Domestic Short Hair Mix

I’m a 9-year-old cat looking for my forever home! I’m sweet, affectionate and relaxed. I would do well as the only pet in the home in a laid-back environment. My favorite activity is napping! I love to be petted and shown love. I would be a great companion for a senior or someone who is looking for a calm, loving, low-maintenance cat. My adoption fee is waived due to generous grant funding.

 

More about Missy:

  • Animal ID: 33958186
  • Species: Cat
  • Breed: Domestic Shorthair/Mix
  • Age 9 years 8 months
  • Gender: Female
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Black/Orange
  • Spayed
  • Not declawed

Safya – Female Catahoula Leopard Mix

Safya

I’m a playful and friendly 4-year-old dog looking for my forever home! I’m an active dog who would do well in a home with people who give me an active lifestyle by playing with me, going for walks, etc. I am kenneled with a playful male dog and we get along great! Having a dog friend in the home would be a great way for me to get out some of my energy by having a friend to play with. I would not do well in a home with cats. I would do well in a home with older/respectful children. Please come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan!

 

More about Safya:

  • Animal ID: 35588482
  • Species: Dog
  • Breed: Catahoula Leopard Dog/Mix
  • Age: 4 years 1 month 25 days
  • Gender: Female
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Grey/Black
  • Spayed
Feisty

Feisty – Female Domestic Short Hair Mix

I’m a 3-year-old cat looking for my forever home! I was brought in to HSWM as a stray in April and am looking for a good home to call my own. I would do well in a relaxed home. I enjoy napping, being petted, and playing around. Please come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan! Cat adoption fees are only $15.

 

More about Feisty:

  • Animal ID: 35187536
  • Species: Cat
  • Breed: Domestic Shorthair/Mix
  • Age 3 years 20 days
  • Gender: Female
  • Size: Small
  • Color: White/Orange
  • Not declawed

Adoption fee includes:

  • A physical done by the staff veterinarian
  • A test for heartworm disease (if six months or older)
  • A first series of vaccines including DHLPP (distemper combo), Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine, and rabies (if older than 14 weeks of age)
  • Spay/Neuter Surgery
  • Treatment for internal parasites
  • One dose of flea preventative
  • One dose of heartworm preventative

The organization automatically microchips all adoptable animals using 24PetWatch microchips, which include FREE registration into the 24PetWatch pet recovery service. For more information visit www.24petwatch.com or call 1.866.597.2424. This pet is also provided with 30 days of FREE ShelterCare Pet Health Insurance with a valid email address. For more information visit www.sheltercare.com or call 1.866.375.7387 (PETS).


Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tues-Fri 12-7, Sat & Sun 11-4.

Baby animals are adorable — but leave ’em alone, OK?

A possum family

By Blandford Nature Center and Victoria Mullen

 

Aw, isn’t that baby animal just adorable? Maybe you’re tempted to scoop him up and turn him into a pet — after all, he must be starving, because mom isn’t around, right?

 

Not necessarily. In fact, if you intervene, you could make things a lot worse.

Baby mammals

Mammal babies are usually born naked with their eyes shut and require a lot of care from their parents. People are often tempted to take in mammal babies and try to raise the babies themselves. This is a bad idea. Not only is it illegal to do so without the proper permits, but it is dangerous for the animal and yourself for multiple reasons:

 

Misfeeding or Dietary troubles

People will try to feed mammal babies, and they will often end up having the babies choke to death on the food. Many people are under the misguided impression that since it is a baby animal, they should get milk from the store and feed that to it; however, only humans and cows can digest cows’ milk! Baby animals are lactose intolerant, which means that drinking milk will cause diarrhea, which may result in death (due to dehydration and lack of nutrition).

 

Mammals can carry a variety of diseases.

For example, raccoons can carry distemper, rabies, and a roundworm parasite that can be transmitted to other mammals, including humans. The parasite finds its way into the body and can burrow into the brain.

 

Squirrel siblings

Another problem is that of imprinting.

People who don’t know how to properly rehabilitate animals will end up with imprinted babies — even skilled rehabbers can have problems with imprinting babies. So, when the cute baby mammal turns into a mean adult mammal, and you try to release it, it can come right back and not be afraid of you, other humans, or people’s dogs and cats. Imprinting makes it easier for these animals to be hunted or injured, and there have been attacks on people by imprinted animals, particularly children.

About bunnies

Baby rabbits are often found in backyards. Rabbits will make nests in shallow depressions in the ground, in grassy areas. These areas are often near edges of forest, by fences, and under shrubs. Before you mow the lawn or rototill your garden, you should check the area for rabbit nests, and if you find one, just work around it and wait a few weeks; the babies will be ready to leave and get out of your way.

 

Bunnies are born with their eyes closed and no fur. Their ears are close to their head. Bunnies are on their own when they are around 5 inches long and furry, with their eyes open and ears up. They may still hang out with each other near the nest for awhile before going their separate ways. You don’t want to bring these older bunnies to a wildlife rehabber, since they don’t need help, and bunnies tend to become stressed out very easily and could die from just the transport to a rehab center. It’s a good idea to make sure they need help before trying to help them, or you could do more harm than good.

 

Baby bunnies

If you find a nest with bunnies inside that are too young to be on their own, unless they look injured, leave them alone. The mother will come back, but not until dusk and dawn. So, you won’t see her coming back to the nest. If you’re worried that the mother isn’t coming back to the nest, put flour around the nest and place some twigs in an X formation over the nest, and check back the next morning. If the flour and/or twigs have been disturbed, the mother hasn’t abandoned her babies. If you happen to touch one of the babies, just put it back and gently touch the others so they all smell the same. The mother will still accept them, just make sure you don’t handle them much.

 

It is not a good idea to move a rabbit nest, but if you can’t wait a week or two for them to leave, or if you have already disturbed the nest, you can try to move it. You should move it to an area as close as possible to the original location, in an area that has some longish grass, possibly under a shrub. Put the fur that was in the old nest in the new one, and cover the bunnies with dry grass. Again wait till the morning to see if the nest was visited by the mother, using flour and twigs.

 

For info on other baby animals, go here.

 

 

Cats of the Week: Goldie and Buzz

Meet Buzz! Could he be any cuter? We think not.

By Sharon Wylie, Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable pet — or few –from an area shelter. This week’s beauties are from Crash’s Landing. Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Denyes, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


Beyond-beautiful Buzz (born in April of 2005) and drop-dead gorgeous Goldie (born in April of 2004) were former Crash Cats known as ‘M-n-M’ and ‘Horatio’ back in the day. Both boys were so social and adorable that it was no surprise to any of us that they got adopted (and together) not too long after they were put on Petfinder.


The dashing duo resided harmoniously with a retired gentleman for the better part of nine years, but when their proud papa passed away in 2016, the boys were relocated to a relative’s house. Unfortunately, the relative’s two feline residents didn’t take kindly to the additional company, so he contacted us in early April of 2017, asking if we would be willing to open our doors to them once again; we jumped at the opportunity without hesitation.


We hadn’t seen the guys in years, so the first order of business was to get them out to the clinic for wellness exams, re-testing, vaccines, lab work and dental cleanings. Buzz needed a few teeth extracted and some minor grooming (as the fur on his undercarriage tends to mat and clump, since it is soft as down) but other than that, he was good (no, great) to go!


Goldie fared a little bit worse, as Dr. Jen discovered the reason he had been over-grooming his belly prior to his arrival was that he suffers from an inflammatory condition of his bladder known as Feline Idiopathic Cystitis; Dr. Jen suspects the stress of his owner’s death and upheaval from the move exacerbated this underlying condition that can wax and wane.


In order to control this extremely common affliction, Goldie was put on daily canned food and oral anti-inflammatory medication. He was also started on monthly injections of a drug that helps protect the cartilage in his joints, as Dr. Jen had diagnosed him with a tear of his anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee back in 2014. Now he simply glides around our place with grace and ease, as comfy as they come; since both medications are very inexpensive, we don’t feel that either condition is a deterrent to adoption. For an old guy, Goldie does pretty darn well for himself!


Meet gorgeous Goldie!

We were a bit concerned as to how the pair would fare, not having lived at Crash’s for over 10 years, but we needn’t have given it a second thought, as they settled in so seamlessly and quickly that you would have thought they never left! Both are VERY nice boys who seek out any attention they can get; if you stand still for more than a few seconds, Buzz will jump onto your shoulders or try to climb you like a tree, and Goldie follows the volunteers around asking for belly rubs constantly. They aren’t particularly bonded, so they do not have to go into a home together, though Goldie would do best in a place without small kids, as he likes to nip a bit when you touch his hindquarters.


Overall, each fab cat couldn’t be sweeter; both are excellent choices for companions! Take it from us when we say that seniors make THE BEST PETS, as they seem to be sincerely appreciative for another chance at a life surrounded by creature comforts and people to adore and share their time with!

More about Buzz:

  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Declawed
  • Current on vaccinations
  • Coat Length: Medium
More about Goldie:
  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Declawed
  • Current on vaccinations
  • Special needs
  • Coat Length: Short
Want to adopt Buzz or Goldie — or both? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.

Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

Bats in the belfry — er, attic? Tips to keep the wildlife out of your home

Adorable chickadee

By Blandford Nature Center and Victoria Mullen

 

Ah, wildlife. Who doesn’t enjoy watching birds eat from a feeder or squirrels chasing each other around the backyard trees?

 

Yes, wildlife can be just ducky — until some poor, little critter gets into your garbage or finds his or her way into your house. It’s amazing how destructive these little beasties can be. To be fair, it’s not their fault.

 

Here are some measures you can take to make sure the wild stays wild — outside:

  1. For porches or spaces under buildings like garages and sheds, bury chicken wire a foot down in the dirt and affix it to the bottom side of the structure to prevent animals from living under there.
  2. Cover laundry vents with mesh or chicken wire to prevent birds and other animals from getting in or nesting there.
  3. Cap chimneys to prevent wildlife from coming in the chimney. Many types of wildlife, including bats, owls and raccoons think it’s a cozy place to stay or investigate. Don’t worry — Santa can still get through.
  4. Secure all garbage, recycling and compost containers or bins. You may not be feeding wildlife directly, however, if the lids of your waste containers aren’t firmly shut, wildlife could be encouraged to return to an easy-to-access food source.
  5. Don’t feed animals (bird feeders, etc.) if you don’t want to encourage them to be around or possibly inside your home.

So far, so good, right?

 

But what if you happen across an injured or baby animal that can’t survive on its own? Try calling a wildlife rehabilitator.

 

Gray squirrel

The following are the main rehabbers in the Grand Rapids area:

  • Peg & Roger Markle of Wildlife Rehab Center LTD  616-361-6109
  • Sjana Gordon of Michigan Wildlife Center 616-885-4223
  • Sue Stamy of Braveheart Raptor Rehab Center 231-821-9125
  • Buck DeRiuscher for lost banded pigeons 616-897-8206 (Can call to figure out where the bird came from, also look online at www.pigeon.org. The owners often don’t want the banded pigeons back, as they see them as defective. These pigeons can be kept as pets or you can see if the animal shelter will take them in.)

It is illegal to rehab skunks, bats, and raccoons in Michigan, so there are no wildlife rehabilitators that can take them in.

 

The following pest removal services will charge a removal fee:
  • Advantage Wildlife Management 616.460.3966
  • Mike’s Wild Animal Control 616.340.4263
  • Mike Roberts 616.738.8565 (Will relocate animals, euthanize if injured only)
  • Critter Control 616.245.4680
  • Chimney Sweeps 616.774.0027
  • Grand Rapids Pest (Insects) Control 616.784.2288
  • Bee Movers G&S 616.364.7736
  • Organization for Bat Conservation 1.800.276.7074 (Located in Bloomfield Hills, they can answer questions about bats [removal, housing, etc.])

List of other Licensed Michigan Wildlife Rehabbers.

Live trapping

Before you decide to live trap an animal…

  1. You need to figure out where you will relocate it. To decrease the possible spread of diseases, mammals cannot be relocated outside of their original county. You need to have the permission of the property owner whose land you’re releasing the animals on, as they may not want your nuisance animal to become theirs. Blandford doesn’t allow animal dumping on the property because we already have established animals and adding outside animals can put stress on our flora and fauna populations. It also increases people vs animal incidents on the property.
  2. Once you remove an animal from your property, you need to find out how to exclude that animal or another animal from coming right back to that area, such as under your porch, inside your attic, etc. Otherwise, you can be dealing with the problem again.
  3. It is recommended to cover the live trap with a towel or tarp, because if you trap a skunk, on purpose or not, if it’s covered it will not spray you.

Don’t use rat poison!

Many rodent poisons do not kill the rodent right away; they cause the animal to slowly bleed out. This slow death allows other animals to eat that rodent, causing you to poison that animal as well. Pets and children can get into those poisons too, so it’s not worth the risk of losing a love one. Using a snap trap is the better way to go.

 

If you are still having problems with pest wildlife, please contact one of the wildlife management services listed in the contacts above.

Pets of the Week: Lola and Missy, Shadow and Khloe

By Brooke Hotchkiss, Humane Society of West Michigan


Each week, WKTV features an adoptable furry friend (or few) from various shelters in the Grand Rapids area. This week, we focus on Humane Society of West Michigan, located at 3077 Wilson Dr. NW in Grand Rapids.


Humane Society of West Michigan’s mission is to rescue hurt, abused and abandoned animals and find them a new forever home. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization helps over 8,000 animals annually and is 100% donor-funded by caring individuals and businesses in the community. Additional programs help reduce pet overpopulation, provide assistance to low-income pet owners, behaviorally assess animals and reunite lost pets with their owners.


Lola – Female Wire Fox Terrier / American Staffordshire Terrier Mix

Meet Lola!

I’m a 2-year-old dog looking for my forever home! I was transferred to Humane Society of West Michigan three weeks ago and am currently living in a foster home. When I first arrived I was very nervous and scared, so HSWM connected me with a loving foster home right away. I’ve been building up trust for people and I like to be a little shadow following my people and dog friends around! I LOVE being with other dogs and must go home with a social, playful dog that I could become BFFs with and do everything together! I enjoy playing in the water and having fun. If you’re interested in meeting me, please call Humane Society of West Michigan at 616.453.8900 for more information or to set up a meet and greet!


More about Lola:

  • Animal ID: 35442655
  • Breed: Terrier, Fox, Wire/Terrier, American Staffordshire
  • Age: 2 years
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: White/Black
  • Neutered

Missy – Female Domestic Short Hair

Gorgeous Missy

I’m a sweet 9-year-old cat who enjoys a laid-back environment and would do well in a relaxed home. I would do best as either the only pet in the house or with other laid-back cats. I’m affectionate, but I also like having my own space to hide and snooze! Senior pets, ages 7 years and older, have their adoption fees waived due to generous grant funding.


More about Missy:

  • Animal ID: 33958186
  • Breed: Domestic Shorthair/Mix
  • Age: 9 years
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Black/Orange
  • Spayed
  • Not declawed

Shadow — Female Labrador Retriever/Chow Chow Mix

Meet Shadow!

I’m a 1-year-old, sweet, medium-sized dog (45 lbs) looking for my forever home! I’m a playful and polite dog who gets along with other dogs (I’ve mostly met male dogs) and am currently sharing a kennel with a male dog — we’re doing great as roommates! I would do well with older/respectful children. I’ve lived with children successfully in the past. I’m a goofball that likes to play around and have fun, but would also benefit from taking a basic behavior class with my new family to better learn basic commands. Come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan!

 

More about Shadow:

  • Animal ID: 35455675
  • Breed: Retriever, Labrador/Chow Chow Mix
  • Age: 1 year
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Black
  • Spayed

Khloe – Female Siamese Mix

Lovely Khloe

I’m a 3-year-old cat, sweet cat looking for a laid-back home to call my own! I used to live with a blind dog and we had some challenges getting along, so I would likely do best in a home without dogs. I enjoy playing around and then taking a nice loooooong nap. Please come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan and see if I am the right fit for your home! Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tuesday-Friday 12-7, Saturday & Sunday 11-4.


More about Chloe:

  • Animal ID: 35377775
  • Breed: Siamese Mix
  • Age: 3 years
  • Size: Large
  • Color: Buff/Orange
  • Spayed
  • Not declawed

Adoption fee includes:

  • A physical done by the staff veterinarian
  • A test for heartworm disease (if six months or older)
  • A first series of vaccines including DHLPP (distemper combo), Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine, and rabies (if older than 14 weeks of age)
  • Spay/Neuter Surgery
  • Treatment for internal parasites
  • One dose of flea preventative
  • One dose of heartworm preventative

The organization automatically microchips all adoptable animals using 24PetWatch microchips, which include FREE registration into the 24PetWatch pet recovery service. For more information visit www.24petwatch.com or call 1.866.597.2424. This pet is also provided with 30 days of FREE ShelterCare Pet Health Insurance with a valid email address. For more information visit www.sheltercare.com or call 1.866.375.7387 (PETS).


Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tues-Fri 12-7, Sat & Sun 11-4.

Cat of the Week: Chesterfield

Just look at those ears!

By Sharon Wylie, Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable pet from an area shelter. This week’s beauty is from Crash’s Landing. Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


Montcalm County contacted us in January of 2017 for help with this rough-n-tumble tom cat that had a nasty herpes infection in his eyes causing him quite a bit of trouble. Born in early 2013, the mighty and muscular stud came in sporting tom cat toughness, a bit of an attitude and eyelids that were rolling inward, causing corneal irritation and ultimately requiring two surgeries to completely repair.


Over time, Chesterfield’s orneriness has resolved wonderfully, to the point that he has become an extremely social and outgoing guy who gets along famously well with most of the other kitties. On occasion a bigger male may bully him, but Chesterfield doesn’t let it bother him, preferring to hang out with the mellower population of feline kind at his current foster home.


We asked Chesterfield’s foster mom to speak a few words on his behalf, in the hopes of finding him a permanent home:


Listen — you can almost hear him purr!

“He LOVES being around people and typically comes out to find you wherever you are; he is definitely not shy, though he is both laid-back and fearless at the same time. He is also very opinionated about when he is finished being petted, but as long as you listen to him there is no issue. He settled right in and made himself at home immediately, but sadly can’t stay home long-term due to the brattiness of Martin [one of the foster mom’s other cats], who doesn’t think he was as cool as the humans and the other four feline residents in the household do. We will miss him!”


So how about helping a handsome hunk out and take a chance on this charming black-and-white boy with the slightly askew ears and a gaze that will peer into your soul sweetly? We promise you, you won’t be sorry!

 

 

Pets of the week: Bentley and Brina

By Brooke Hotchkiss, Humane Society of West Michigan


Each week, WKTV features an adoptable furry friend (or few) from various shelters in the Grand Rapids area. This week, we focus on Humane Society of West Michigan, located at 3077 Wilson Dr. NW in Grand Rapids.


Humane Society of West Michigan’s mission is to rescue hurt, abused and abandoned animals and find them a new forever home. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization helps over 8,000 animals annually and is 100% donor-funded by caring individuals and businesses in the community. Additional programs help reduce pet overpopulation, provide assistance to low-income pet owners, behaviorally assess animals and reunite lost pets with their owners.


Meet Bentley!

Bentley – Male Pit Bull Terrier mix

I’m a playful, 2½-year-old pup looking for my forever home! I am friendly, social, and love to play. Sometimes I’m picky with other dogs, so it’d be best to bring your current dog in to meet me before taking me home. I would prefer a home without cats. Tug-o-war and chase are my favorite games to play. If you’re interested in meeting me, please visit Humane Society of West Michigan!

 

About Bentley:

  • Animal ID: 33660748
  • Breed: Boxer/American Pit Bull/Mix
  • Age: 2½ years
  • Gender: Male
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Charcoal
  • Neutered

To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.


Beautiful Brina

Brina – Female Domestic Long Hair

I’m a 1½-year-old cat looking for my forever home! I love attention, but I can be a bit shy at first. I would prefer to be the only pet in the home, and I would do best with older, respectful children. I would love a quieter home. Adult cats five months and older currently have their adoption fees waived. If I sound like the right fit for you, please visit me at Humane Society of West Michigan!

 

About Brina:

  • Animal ID: 34812030
  • Breed: Domestic Longhair/Mix
  • Age: 1½ year
  • Gender: Female
  • Size: Small
  • Color: Brown/White
  • Spayed
  • Not declawed

To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.

 

Adoption fee includes:

  • A physical done by the staff veterinarian
  • A test for heartworm disease (if six months or older)
  • A first series of vaccines including DHLPP (distemper combo), Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine, and rabies (if older than 14 weeks of age)
  • Spay/Neuter Surgery
  • Treatment for internal parasites
  • One dose of flea preventative
  • One dose of heartworm preventative

The organization automatically microchips all adoptable animals using 24PetWatch microchips, which include FREE registration into the 24PetWatch pet recovery service. For more information visit www.24petwatch.com or call 1-866-597-2424. This pet is also provided with 30 days of FREE ShelterCare Pet Health Insurance with a valid email address. For more information visit www.sheltercare.com or call 1-866-375-7387 (PETS).


Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tues-Fri 12-7, Sat & Sun 11-4.

Cat of the week: Brimley

Look at this guy… just LOOK at him!

By Sharon Wylie, Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


Dr. Jen had purposely saved this name for when a cat arrived that came in as a diabetic (c’mon, everyone has seen those commercials, haven’t they?). So she was excited when she finally got the chance to use it when this fine, FIV fella came to the sanctuary through Carol’s Ferals on September 4th, 2012. Well, she wasn’t excited he had diabetes, but you have to admit that it is pretty clever naming.

In any case, this poor pussycat found himself in very dire straits when first taken in to CF, and since he had way more medically wrong with him than they felt they could handle (he hadn’t been diagnosed at that point), Dr. Jen offered to take him in and figure out what was going on.


Born in March of 2010, Brimley sure had seen some rough patches while out of the streets of Grand Rapids. This nub-tailed ragamuffin was a filthy, albeit friendly, fella who was starving for food, affection and blood glucose regulation. In fact, his sugar levels were so out of whack that it took a few weeks on a pretty high insulin dosage to knock his sugar levels down to a dull roar.


Brimley is the sweetest kitty

And then, a pleasant surprise: Brimley went into remission! Diabetics can be fickle, so he may very well require insulin in the future, so we are keeping tabs on his status and fattening him up, which he is more than thrilled about (he was less thrilled with his twice daily shots, but he tolerated them alright as he got treats in return).


Being FIV-positive (read about FIV here) will be less of a drawback than being diabetic; cats with dual issues like this are harder to adopt out, as it takes a special person to commit to a lifetime of meds and follow-ups. But, all of us here at Big Sids feel Brimley is more than worth it, and we know once you meet this cutie pie you will see why we feel he deserves every chance at a life in a home of his own!


More about Brimley:

  • FIV-positive
  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Current on vaccinations

Want to adopt Brimley? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

 

Wyoming to begin Gypsy Moth mitigation spraying this week

Spraying selected areas of the City of Wyoming for Gypsy Moth caterpillars will begin soon.

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

The City of Wyoming’s annual efforts to mitigate Gypsy Moth infestation in the city will continue this month, with aerial spraying of selected areas scheduled to start Monday, June 5.

 

Households in the affected areas should have received letters notifying of the city’s mitigation efforts.

 

A female Gypsy Moth.

“The City of Wyoming is once again taking measures to protect our neighborhoods against Gypsy Moths, and the aerial spray is targeted for June 5-7,” Megan Sall, Assistant City Manager, said in an email to WKTV Journal. “If weather cooperates, you may hear/see our contractor’s helicopter overhead as early as 6 a.m. on the 5th. Under ideal conditions, the entire application will take 4-5 hours to complete. The contractor will start in the southern portion of the City and work his way north.”

 

According to the city, the insecticide being used is derived from a naturally occurring bacteria and is known only to affect Gypsy Moth caterpillars. It does not affect honeybees or other non-leaf eating insects, birds, fish or mammals. The insecticide is applied at a quart per acre in a very fine mist that targets the trees. The carrier liquid is water and drying usually takes place within a few minutes.

 

Despite the fast-drying nature of the mist, the city spokesperson said, residents are encouraged to exercise common sense and stay inside while the spray is occurring in their neighborhoods.

 

A map of the affected areas and more information can be found on the city’s website, as well as available on the city’s Facebook page.

 

Visit here for a previous WKTV story on Gypsy Moths.

 

 

Cat of the week: Abby

Meet adorable Abby!

By Sharon Wylie, Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable pet from various local shelters. Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


Not too long after Abby was first adopted out, her new mom relocated out of the country and asked her grandparents to care for her (we were not aware of this exchange until after the fact).


Everyone seemed to be doing well for many months until Dr. Jen received a call: Abby had fallen very ill and continued medical care was not affordable. Of course Dr. Jen asked her to be brought back to the shelter immediately so treatment could be started for profound weight loss, diarrhea and a non-regenerative anemia that was proving to be life-threatening.


When Abby arrived at the clinic, Dr. Jen was astounded at what rough shape she was in; the one portly princess who tipped the scales at 11# was down to a mere 7-1/2#, all skin and bones, weak and rail-thin. Thankfully, heavy-duty antibiotics and steroids acted efficiently to counteract the devastating effects of a blood parasite, and within a few short weeks, Abby was gaining weight, color had returned to her pale mucous membranes and some of her vibrant energy was restored. Having not been her primary caretaker for quite some time, Dr. Jen surmised that physiological stress caused by significant oral inflammation and pain exacerbated the blood parasite (can lay dormant for years); had her oral condition been addressed in a timely manner, it is possible she would have not fallen so ill in the first place.


All of her teeth except her canine had to be removed in hopes of controlling a condition known as Feline Stomatitis, but no worries on the chewing and chomping front, as Abby is able to chow down with the best of em!


Abby had been through more trials and tribulations in her years on this earth (she was born in the summer of 2008) than any one animal should ever be expected to, but she has handled herself with grace in the face of adversity. She is not one to complain or carry on, but a gentle, divine soul who wants nothing more than to be loved and told how pretty she is! Her bladder inflammation (Feline Idiopathic Cystitis) is controlled with daily medication and minimizing her external stressors, as keeping her days as low-stress as possible is what this doctor has ordered!


She has overcome some pretty amazing odds as of late, and we are doing everything within our power to insure that Abby is happy, healthy and well-cared for, so we are planning on her staying put for the time being. Dr. Jen needs to be 100% sure that her anemia resolves completely, and that we are able to get her as healthy as possible before going to a new home.


Abby is positive for Feline Leukemia, but potential adopters shouldn’t rule her out for this. Read about the facts on Feline Leukemia here.


More about Abby:

  • FELV/FIC/stomatitis
  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Declawed
  • Special needs
  • Current on vaccinations
Want to adopt Abby? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.

Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

Humane Society of West Michigan offers animal camps for kids ages 5-17 this summer

All photos courtesy Humane Society of West Michigan

By Humane Society of West Michigan


Spend your summer with the animals!


Humane Society of West Michigan’s Summer Camp is a great place for your kids to spend their summer learning, growing and having a fun-filled experience that will leave a lasting impression! Summer Camps are filled with activities, games, crafts, lessons and hands-on experience for everyone based on animals and animal welfare! Five different camps are offered for a variety of ages and interests.

  • Full day sessions —  from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
  • AM sessions — from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
  • PM sessions — from 1-4 p.m.
  • After Care and Before Care are available for an additional fee.

Camp PET PALS

This camp offers a new theme everyday, including Delightful Dogs, Fun with Critters, Feline Friends and more. Days are filled with crafts, games and fun! Campers are expected to bring their own lunch, snack and a water bottle each day. Limited to 40 campers per session.

  • June 19-23, ages 5-7 — half-day sessions (AM and PM)
  • June 26-30, ages 8-10 — full-day sessions
  • July 17-21, ages 11-13 — full-day sessions
  • July 24-28, ages 5-7 — half-day sessions (AM and PM)
  • August 7-11, ages 8-10 — full-day sessions
  • August 21-25, ages 8-10 — full-day sessions

MEDIA MUTTS Camp

In this learn-and-create camp, campers will learn about a new topic each day focused on animals. There are different activities and projects throughout the week leading up to the final unique media project. Campers are expected to bring their own lunch, snack and water bottle each day. Limited to 40 campers per session.

  • August 14-18, ages 8-12 — full-day sessions

Vet Camp

In this hands-on camp, teens who are seriously considering a career in veterinary medicine will learn the ins and outs of being a vet. Spend some time with HSWM’s vet staff and watch surgeries, participate in dissections, practice suturing and injections, learn about diagnostic testing and more! Campers are expected to bring their own lunch, snack and a water bottle each day. Limited to 25 campers per session.

  • July 10-14, ages 13-17 — half-day sessions (AM)
  • July 31-August 4, ages 13-17 — half-day sessions (AM)

K9 Enrichment Camp

Sit, stay and come are just a few of the basic commands you will teach shelter dogs during this canine enrichment-filled camp. Learn basic and advanced obedience training, scent training, agility training, enrichment and socialization! Trainers will practice positive reinforcement training and special skills. They will also perform further research in body language, behavior assessment and breed histories to create a long-term strategy for a shelter dog. Campers are expected to bring their own lunch, snack and a water bottle each day. Limited to 25 campers per session.

  • July 10-14, ages 13-17 — half-day sessions (PM)
  • July 31-August 4, ages 13-17 — half-day sessions (PM)

Animal Advocates Mini Camp

In this mini three-day camp, campers who are passionate about animal welfare and making a difference will meet guest speakers and learn about current animal issues in our community. Each day campers will learn about a new topic through games, crafts and activities and even complete a service learning project! Campers are expected to bring their own lunch, snack and a water bottle each day. Limited to 40 campers per session.

  • July 5-7, ages 13-17 — full-day sessions

Reserve your place by signing up today!

Sign-up by emailing JordAnn your Summer Camp Registration Form (below) at jbush@hswestmi.org.


Go here to download the Summer Camp Registration Form.


Adoptable pets from Humane Society of West Michigan: Gracelyn, Tommy & Jerry

Gracelyn

By Brooke Hotchkiss, Humane Society of West Michigan


Each week, WKTV features an adoptable furry friend (or few) from various shelters in the Grand Rapids area. This week, we focus on Humane Society of West Michigan, located at 3077 Wilson Dr. NW in Grand Rapids.


Humane Society of West Michigan’s mission is to rescue hurt, abused and abandoned animals and find them a new forever home. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization helps over 8,000 animals annually and is 100% donor-funded by caring individuals and businesses in the community. Additional programs help reduce pet overpopulation, provide assistance to low-income pet owners, behaviorally assess animals and reunite lost pets with their owners.


Gracelyn — Female Boxer/American Pit Bull Terrier Mix

I’m a playful 2-year-old girl looking for my forever home! I have been waiting to find my family since October of 2016 at Humane Society of West Michigan, and before that at another shelter. I’m an active and playful dog who would do well in a home with no small children due to my activity level. Being only 2 years old, my family would ideally be willing to spend some time and energy training me to help me become the perfect fit! I’ve got a lot of love to give and know I could make someone very happy! I am currently living with a foster family to give me a break from the stress of the kennels so that I can relax in a home environment. If you’re interested in meeting finding out more or meeting me please call Humane Society of West Michigan at 616.453.8900 to schedule a meet and greet. My adoption fee ($175) will be paid by Kool Toyota, and Kool Toyota will also give my new family a $100 gift card to Chow Hound Pet Supplies to help get me settled!

 

About Gracelyn:

  • Breed: Boxer/American Pit Bull Terrier Mix
  • Age: 2 years
  • Gender: Female

To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.

 

Tommy & Jerry — Male Domestic Short Hair

Tommy & Jerry are a bonded pair

We are a pair of 13-year-old cats who have lived our whole lives together. We are a bonded pair and must be adopted together. We would like to live in a quiet, relaxed home where we would have our own space to snuggle up and nap. We are both front declawed. Senior pets (ages 7 years and older) always have their adoption fees waived due to generous grant funding.

 

About the boys:

  • Breed: Domestic Short Hair
  • Age: 13 years
  • Gender: Male
  • Color: Tabby
  • Neutered
  • Front paw declawed

To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.


Adoption fee includes:

  • A physical done by the staff veterinarian
  • A test for heartworm disease (if six months or older)
  • A first series of vaccines including DHLPP (distemper combo), Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine, and rabies (if older than 14 weeks of age)
  • Spay/Neuter Surgery
  • Treatment for internal parasites
  • One dose of flea preventative
  • One dose of heartworm preventative

The organization automatically microchips all adoptable animals using 24PetWatch microchips, which include FREE registration into the 24PetWatch pet recovery service. For more information visit www.24petwatch.com or call 1-866-597-2424. This pet is also provided with 30 days of FREE ShelterCare Pet Health Insurance with a valid email address. For more information visit www.sheltercare.com or call 1-866-375-7387 (PETS).


Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tues-Fri 12-7, Sat & Sun 11-4.

Adoptable pets from Humane Society of West Michigan: Esmeralda and Tiny

By Brooke Hotchkiss, Humane Society of West Michigan


Each week, WKTV features an adoptable furry friend (or few) from various shelters in the Grand Rapids area. This week, we focus on Humane Society of West Michigan, located at 3077 Wilson Dr. NW in Grand Rapids.


Humane Society of West Michigan’s mission is to rescue hurt, abused and abandoned animals and find them a new forever home. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization helps over 8,000 animals annually and is 100% donor-funded by caring individuals and businesses in the community. Additional programs help reduce pet overpopulation, provide assistance to low-income pet owners, behaviorally assess animals and reunite lost pets with their owners.


Esmeralda

Esmeralda — Female American Pit Bull Terrier Mix

I’m a sweet and playful 1-year-old girl looking for my forever home. I recently had surgery to repair a hip joint issue and am recovering well in a foster home. I love to cuddle and sit on laps! I would do well in a home that is relaxed enough to give the time and TLC to recover from my surgery. If you’re interested in meeting me please call Humane Society of West Michigan!

 

More about Esmeralda:

  • Breed: Terrier, American Pit Bull/Mix
  • Age: 1 years
  • Gender: Female
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: White/Tan
  • Spayed
  • Animal ID: 34828096

To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.

 

Tiny

Tiny — Male Domestic Shorthair

I’m a small 5-year-old cat who enjoys having my own space to snuggle up and snooze. I was transferred to HSWM from another animal shelter making much of my history a mystery. Adult cats, ages 5 months and older, have their adoption fees waived right now. Please come meet me and see if we are the purr-fect fit!

 

More about Tiny:

  • Breed: Domestic Shorthair/Mix
  • Age: 5 years
  • Gender: Male
  • Size: Small
  • Color: Brown
  • Neutered
  • Animal ID: 34969206

To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.


Adoption fee includes:

  • A physical done by the staff veterinarian
  • A test for heartworm disease (if six months or older)
  • A first series of vaccines including DHLPP (distemper combo), Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine, and rabies (if older than 14 weeks of age)
  • Spay/Neuter Surgery
  • Treatment for internal parasites
  • One dose of flea preventative
  • One dose of heartworm preventative

The organization automatically microchips all adoptable animals using 24PetWatch microchips, which include FREE registration into the 24PetWatch pet recovery service. For more information visit www.24petwatch.com or call 1-866-597-2424. This pet is also provided with 30 days of FREE ShelterCare Pet Health Insurance with a valid email address. For more information visit www.sheltercare.com or call 1-866-375-7387 (PETS).


Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tues-Fri 12-7, Sat & Sun 11-4.

 

Adoptable Pet of the Week: Gerdy

Each week WKTV features adoptable pets from area shelters. This week, we focus on Gerdy, a bunny available for adoption at West Michigan Critter Haven.

 

 

By West Michigan Critter Haven


When you think of a rabbit, typically a small, cuddly animal comes to mind. In reality, not all rabbits are small! In fact, giant breeds of rabbits like the Flemish Giant and Checkered giant can weigh in at more than 15lbs! At West Michigan Critter Haven, we have a soft spot for larger breeds of rabbits.


One of our current larger rabbits up for adoption is Gerdy. She’s a spayed Checkered Giant mix weighing in at 14lbs. This big, beautiful rabbit is such a pleasure to be around. She has a larger-than-life personality and is very social and silly. She’s the type of rabbit who thoroughly enjoys being part of the family. When she’s not relaxing in front of the TV, she can be found begging for treats. She does well with well-mannered, cats, dogs, and even enjoys gentle, respectful children.


Gerdy came to us after she was found hiding in a log in the woods. Our best guess is she either escaped or was abandoned. Many people abandon domestic rabbits outdoors thinking they can survive, when in reality, it’s a death sentence. She was covered in fleas but still as friendly as ever.


For being a rabbit found outside, Gerdy has taken to her new life indoors exceptionally well. She has excellent litter box habits and keeps a relatively tidy space. Gerdy adores the attention of her foster family and will even jump up on the couch to beg for food and head scratches — just like a dog! She loves her fresh veggies and fruit. However, like most rabbits, she doesn’t enjoy being held and prefers to spend time sitting next to you, not in your lap.


If you’re thinking about adding a rabbit to your family, Gerdy would be a fantastic addition. Rabbits are extremely intelligent and trainable. They require attention, love and a life indoors with lots of space to run and play.


West Michigan Critter Haven is a chapter of the House Rabbit Society. To learn more about caring for rabbits, please visit http://rabbit.org/.


More About Gerdy:

  • Litter trained
  • Spayed
  • Gets along well with respectful children
  • Does well with other gentle animals

Want to adopt Gerdy? Her adoption fee is $75. You can learn more about Gerdy and other West Michigan Critter Haven adoptables at http://wmicritterhaven.org. All adopters must be at least 18 years old.

Adoptable pets from Humane Society of West Michigan: Bluegrass, Icy, Tommy, Jerry & Rocky

By Brooke Hotchkiss

Humane Society of West Michigan

 

Each week, WKTV features an adoptable furry friend (or few) from various shelters in the Grand Rapids area. This week, we focus on Humane Society of West Michigan, located at 3077 Wilson Dr. NW in Grand Rapids.

 

Humane Society of West Michigan’s mission is to rescue hurt, abused and abandoned animals and find them a new forever home. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization helps over 8,000 animals annually and is 100% donor-funded by caring individuals and businesses in the community. Additional programs help reduce pet overpopulation, provide assistance to low-income pet owners, behaviorally assess animals and reunite lost pets with their owners.


Bluegrass has limited vision, unlimited love

Bluegrass — Male American Pit Bull Terrier

I’m a social and sweet 2-year-old dog looking for my forever home! I have limited vision and reduced depth perception so I would do well in a home with older/respectful children who would take care not to startle me. I would also do well in a home where I don’t have to take too many stairs because this can be tough with my limited vision. Please come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan!

 

More about Bluegrass:

  • Breed: Terrier, American Pit Bull/Mix
  • Age: 2 years
  • Gender: Male
  • Size: Medium
  • Neutered
  • Animal ID: 34721285
Adorable Icy has been waiting since December 2016 for a home of her own

Icy — Female Domestic Short Hair

I’m a sweet 12-year-old cat STILL looking for my forever home! I have been patiently waiting at Humane Society of West Michigan since December 2016. I can be shy and like having my own little hiding space, but I’m also very friendly and loving. I enjoy pets and will approach visitors for some pets and ear scratches. I would do well with older, respectful children and a relaxed home. Please come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan! Adoption fees are waived for animals 7 years and older, thanks to generous grant funding.


More about Icy:

  • Breed: Domestic Short Hair
  • Age: 12 years
  • Gender: Female
  • Size: Small
  • Color: Brown/Orange
  • Spayed
  • Animal ID: 34225686

Tommy & Jerry — Male Domestic Short Hairs

Meet this dynamic pair of 13-year-old cats that have lived their whole lives together. They are a bonded pair and must be adopted together. They’d like to live in a quiet, relaxed home where we would have their own space to snuggle up and nap. They are both front declawed. Thanks to generous grant funding, senior pets (ages 7 years and older) always have their adoption fees waived.


More about Jerry:

  • Breed: Domestic Shorthair/Mix
  • Age: 13+
  • Gender: Male
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Brown
  • Neutered
  • Declawed
  • Must be adopted with Tommy
  • Animal ID: 30861577

More about Tommy:

  • Breed: Domestic Shorthair/Mix
  • Age: 13+
  • Gender: Male
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Brown/Black
  • Neutered
  • Must be adopted with Jerry
  • Animal ID: 30861563

Rocky — Male Hound Mix

This sweet, 2-year-old dog just recently arrived at HSWM from another shelter in Mississippi, which makes much of his history a mystery. Please come meet him at Humane Society of West Michigan!


This Saturday (4/29), HSWM is participating in Bissell Pet Foundation’s Empty the Shelter event. On Saturday, 4/29 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Bissell Pet Foundation will be paying for the adoption fees for all adult animals at HSWM.


To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.


Adoption fee includes:

  • A physical done by the staff veterinarian
  • A test for heartworm disease (if six months or older)
  • A first series of vaccines including DHLPP (distemper combo), Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine, and rabies (if older than 14 weeks of age)
  • Spay/Neuter Surgery
  • Treatment for internal parasites
  • One dose of flea preventative
  • One dose of heartworm preventative

The organization automatically microchips all adoptable animals using 24PetWatch microchips, which include FREE registration into the 24PetWatch pet recovery service. For more information visit www.24petwatch.com or call 1-866-597-2424. This pet is also provided with 30 days of FREE ShelterCare Pet Health Insurance with a valid email address. For more information visit www.sheltercare.com or call 1-866-375-7387 (PETS).


Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tues-Fri 12-7, Sat & Sun 11-4.

Adoptable pets from Humane Society of West Michigan: Pete & Adalyn

Each week, WKTV features an adoptable furry friend (or few) from various shelters in the Grand Rapids area. This week, we focus on Humane Society of West Michigan, located at 3077 Wilson Dr. NW in Grand Rapids.

 

Humane Society of West Michigan’s mission is to rescue hurt, abused and abandoned animals and find them a new forever home. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization helps over 8,000 animals annually and is 100% donor-funded by caring individuals and businesses in the community. Additional programs help reduce pet overpopulation, provide assistance to low-income pet owners, behaviorally assess animals and reunite lost pets with their owners.

 

Meet Pete!

Pete – Male Domestic Short Hair

I’m a sweet 11-year-old cat looking for my forever home. I’m a quiet, laid-back boy who loves attention. I’d love to have a relaxing home where I can spend time curled up with my favorite people. Please come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan. My adoption fee is waived due to generous grant funding.

Adorable Adalyn

 

More about Pete:

  • Breed: Domestic Shorthair/Mix
  • Age: 11 years
  • Gender: Male
  • Size: Small
  • Neutered
  • Animal ID: 34806488

Adalyn – Female Pit Bull

I’m an affectionate 2-year-old dog who loves people. I am very sweet and loving, and I’m also wiggly when I get excited! I’m a young girl with lots of playful energy. I get along best with male dogs. I’m ready for my forever home! Please come meet me at Humane Society of West Michigan.

 

More about Adalyn:

  • Breed: Terrier, American Pit Bull/Mix
  • Age: 2 years, 7 months
  • Gender: Female
  • Size: Medium
  • Color: Bronze/Black
  • Spayed
  • Animal ID: 34596195

 

To adopt, call 616.453.8900 or email adoptions@hswestmi.org.

 

Adoption fee includes:

  • A physical done by the staff veterinarian
  • A test for heartworm disease (if six months or older)
  • A first series of vaccines including DHLPP (distemper combo), Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccine, and rabies (if older than 14 weeks of age)
  • Spay/Neuter Surgery
  • Treatment for internal parasites
  • One dose of flea preventative
  • One dose of heartworm preventative

The organization automatically microchips all adoptable animals using 24PetWatch microchips, which include FREE registration into the 24PetWatch pet recovery service. For more information visit www.24petwatch.com or call 1-866-597-2424. This pet is also provided with 30 days of FREE ShelterCare Pet Health Insurance with a valid email address. For more information visit www.sheltercare.com or call 1-866-375-7387 (PETS).

 

Humane Society of West Michigan is open Tues-Fri 12-7, Sat & Sun 11-4.

Adoptable Pets of the Week: Buddy & Sheik

Sheik (left) and Buddy must be adopted together as a bonded pair

Each week WKTV features adoptable pets from area shelters. This week, we focus on a couple of cuties from West Michigan Ferret Connection.

 

By West Michigan Ferret Connection

 

Is there a ferret in your future? Since December 22, 1994, ferrets have been legal to own in Michigan. They make very fun pets, but they’re a lot more work than one might think.

 

First, ferrets can live up to 10 years old. That means you’ll need to make a commitment. Then there is the little matter of a very busy and curious little creature who requires mental stimulation and plenty of exercise in ferret-proofed surroundings. Ferrets also need annual vaccinations against distemper and require a rabies shot as well. They are also accident prone, will often eat things they shouldn’t and will need ideally half-yearly health checks with their vet. This can all add up and you may incur similar costs to having an outdoor cat.

 

There are several ferret breeders out there, but the sad fact is, for every ethical breeder there are many backyard breeders who don’t have the animals’ welfare at heart.

 

“In my opinion, ferrets are best obtained by rescue, not from a pet store where ferrets are ‘sold’ specifically for profit,” said Dee Gage, founder of West Michigan Ferret Connection. Featured for adoption this week are Buddy, a one-year-old male chocolate ferret and Sheik, a two-year-old black sable.

 

Dee Gage with her “ferret bouquet”

“I do not ‘sell’ ferrets. I ‘re-home’ them,” said Gage. “They’ve already been ‘dumped’ once and I want to make sure they are not dumped again. The ferrets under my care deserve to have a safe and secure ‘forever’ home and I do everything I can to guarantee that.”

 

There are no “breeds” of ferrets. There ARE, however, 38 different colors and patterns.

 

Established in October 2001, West Michigan Ferret Connection re-homes an average of 50 ferrets per year. Visit their Facebook page here.

 

Is a ferret the right pet for you?

“Ferrets aren’t for everybody and I can’t stress strongly enough that you should do your research,” said Gage.

 

A group of ferrets is called a “business”

Buddy and Sheik must be adopted as a bonded pair. If you’re interested in adopting these cuties, Call WMFC at 616.447.2978 or email wmfc2001@sbcglobal.net.

 

The West Michigan Ferret Connection is a home-based ferret rescue providing rescue services, boarding, adoption & education.

Cat of the week: Kate Spayed

By Sharon Wylie
Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).

 

It is infuriating when so-called ‘pet-owners’ move out and leave their cat (or dog behind), but when winter is in full force and they toss their pet outside to fend for themselves, well we find that selfish act unforgiveable. Luckily a rescuer was hot on the trail of a homeless tail attached to a very striking and saucy girl who wanted back indoors in the worst kinda way. She scooped her up, creating a cozy bed for her in the garage for the night (she has over a dozen kitties of her own so it wasn’t feasible to bring her into her actual home) until she could bring her to the clinic on Dec. 6, 2016.

 

At first the red patch tabby (born in the summer of 2013) was none too pleased being temporarily caged at the clinic, so Dr. Jen let her acclimate overnight, which helped adjust her cattitude immensely. Canned food proved to be the gateway to her soul, and by the next morning Dr. Jen was able to work her up to get her program-ready. With the exception of fleas, Kate Spayed, as Dr. Jen dubbed her, was a pretty healthy girl—thank goodness!

 

Once at Crash’s the diva that is Kate surfaced — she grumped, grumbled and groaned when any other inquisitive feline got too close to her personal space. One-on-one with the humans is another story — she is delightful, possessing the charm and manners of a sophisticated lady, but in the presence of those of her own kind, Kate tends to show her less than purrsonable side, getting overwhelmed quite easily and issuing warning bites so everyone knows to leave her alone. For that reason, we feel that our gorgeous gal should go into a home without any other cats or small children who may not understand her cues when she has simply had enough.

 

Don’t get me wrong, as she is a lovely cat who wants nothing more than to be loved—and to love on her person once again; she doesn’t understand why she was tossed out like trash, she doesn’t understand why her people chose not to love her anymore. What Kate DOES understand is that she is currently bunking with over 40 other cats who want to tickle her whiskers, snuggle up beside her and make friends, but she simply doesn’t have that desire in her. Plain and simple, she just wants a person to cherish her and make her feel comfortable and secure again—and we feel that is not too much to ask for at all; after all, Kate deserves to be a valued furry family member!

Want to adopt Kate Spayed? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

Adoptable Pet of the Week: Carrot

Meet smart, sassy Carrot!

 

Each week WKTV features adoptable pets from area shelters. This week, we focus on Carrot, a bunny available for adoption at West Michigan Critter Haven.

 

By West Michigan Critter Haven

 

Carrot is a Dutch rabbit with a beautiful gray and white coat. But she’s more than looks. She’s a smart, sassy girl and knows what she likes. She adores shoulder rubs and bum scratches. Like most rabbits, she takes pride in her personal space and doesn’t approve of any rearranging that she hasn’t done herself. She loves fresh leafy greens and grass hay. She will grunt her disapproval if you don’t feed her quickly enough, too. Her foster person adores her and Carrot has wiggled her way into the hearts of many that have followed her story and generously donated to cover her medical costs.

 

Like many of our surrendered critters, Carrot the rabbit was relinquished to us by a family who had outgrown her. She was a pet shop purchase for their daughter. Several years later when the daughter left for college, the parents decided they no longer had the time to care for Carrot. They reached out to us and we took Carrot as soon as we had an opening in our foster network, in October 2016.

 

As soon as Carrot came into our care, we had a suspicion something wasn’t quite right. While doing a careful physical check and nail trim for Carrot, we noticed her belly was quite enlarged and as tight as a drum. Our minds immediately went to reproductive organ cancer since Carrot was an unspayed female. Unfortunately, unspayed female rabbits have an 80 percent chance of developing uterine cancer. Spaying and neutering rabbits is absolutely crucial to their health and wellbeing. This is something that many rabbit owners are not aware of.

 

As with all of our unaltered foster rabbits, Carrot went in for her spay surgery just a few days after coming into our care. Our worst fears became reality when our veterinarian informed us that while the surgery went well, Carrot had been suffering from uterine cancer. The mass that was removed from her was nearly one-third of her body mass. And to make matters worse, less than 24 hours after her surgery, Carrot promptly demolished her sutures and ate the staples that were required for the size of the incision.

 

Carrot is a fighter with a huge personality. Her x-rays showed no signs of cancer anywhere else in her body. She also successfully passed her staples. We’re happy to say she’s in wonderful health. So aside from scaring the heck out of us with a rollercoaster of medical issues, the only thing she has left to do in our care is find her forever home.
Carrot is roughly six years old. In rabbit years, this is about middle age. Rabbits routinely live to be 12 years and older. She’s litter trained and spends her unsupervised time in a large dog exercise pen where she can stretch out and romp around freely. We do not advocate the use of cages, as they are quite restrictive. When supervised, she loves exploring her bedroom and other bunny-proofed parts of her foster home.


Carrot is a sweet, independent rabbit that will require a patient, loving adopter. She would do best in a home with adults or a family with mature children who will respect her and give her the space she needs to adjust. Since rabbits are prey animals, most do not like to be held. She is the type of rabbit that enjoys human company on her level. She enjoys flopping down near you while you watch TV or enjoy a book on the floor with her. She will also beg sweetly for treats by standing on her tippy toes against you to do her best to reach the treats in your hand!

Wearing the ‘cone of shame’ after eating her staples

Rabbits are not easy, starter pets. Carrot’s story is the perfect example of this. They are extremely intelligent and trainable. They require attention, love and a life indoors with their families. West Michigan Critter Haven is a chapter of the House Rabbit Society. To learn more about caring for rabbits, please visit http://rabbit.org/.

 

More About Carrot

  • Litter trained
  • Spayed
  • No small children

Want to adopt Carrot? Her adoption fee is $75. You can learn more about Carrot and other West Michigan Critter Haven adoptables at http://wmicritterhaven.org. All adopters must be at least 18 years old.

 

Interested in fostering small animals for West Michigan Critter Haven? Email info@wmicritterhaven.org.

 

Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Donate at http://wmicritterhaven.org!

Cat of the week: Elegant Ellie

Meet Elegant Ellie!

By Sharon Wylie

Crash’s Landing

 

Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).

 

Elegant Ellie first arrived at Crash’s via the Veteran’s Home back in the fall of 2005. Because she was so alluring and outgoing, she was quickly adopted by a wonderful gal, who took her home and doted on her for almost nine years. Dr. Jen was fortunate enough to have been her veterinarian for seven of those years, so she got to see her on a regular basis and offer advice when her mom moved, got married and acquired a dog as a house mate.

 

When the furry and human family moved to Allendale in 2012, Dr. Jen lost contact with her, until an email came to us in August of 2014, asking us to take her back into our program. Seems that for some reason that summer, Ellie took to urinating inappropriately, first on the carpet and then on the couch. Her mom mentioned that the basement did flood due to a leaky pipe, and that is where her litter box was located, and they had a person stay in their finished basement which was previously Ellie’s territory.

 

As we all know, sometimes things WE think aren’t significant enough to warrant a behavior change can indeed be terribly upsetting to a cat, who will then act out by urinating where she shouldn’t. As pet owners, it is up to us to dive deeper into the issue at hand, not blame the cat for being ‘bad’ and figure out what can be done to rectify the problem. But, all members of the household have to be on board with this game plan, and sadly, this wasn’t the case with Ellie.

 

It was extremely difficult for her mom to have to make that tearful trip to the vet’s office to relinquish custody of her little girl, one she had been through so much with over the years, but decisions were made and that was that.

 

Ellie, born in early 2005, was as darling and adorable as Dr. Jen recalled, talking up a storm and purring and head-butting her like the long-lost furry friend she was! Dr. Jen promptly collected a urine sample, which did prove to be completely normal. Knowing that stress is a HUGE factor in feline house soiling issues, she gave Ellie a pep talk, told her to mind her manners, and prepped her for her return to Crash’s. She was in need of dental work, as she hadn’t seen a vet since she left our practice, so I took her to surgery and removed a bad tooth. She woke up ready and raring to go, excited for the next chapter in her life, eager and willing to make new friends.

 

In fact, within a day of arriving back at Crash’s, where she spent no more than a few weeks so long ago, this ebullient girl wanted OUT of the intake suite in a major way! She is extremely affectionate to all who cross her path, seems to really enjoy the company of other cats and is far more outgoing and accepting of her surroundings than Dr. Jen anticipated of a senior citizen new on the scene.

 

If Ellie continues to behave and beguile everyone with her winning ways, Dr. Jen has no doubt that she will be able to place her in a home again. She is simply too sweet and stunning to not afford her another chance!

 

Our policy has always been one of acceptance in spite of imperfections, and we are thrilled to be able to offer her that. Plus, it is very easy to become enamored by her beauty and energy, so we are quite happy to be hosting her once again!

MORE ABOUT ELLIE

  • Declawed
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Current on vaccinations

Want to adopt Ellie? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

 

Cat of the week: Maury Pawvich

By Sharon Wylie

Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).

 

Here’s what Dr. Jen had to say about Maury Pawvich:

 

Sometimes you cross paths with a cat so flipping adorable and outgoing that you cannot fathom why on earth he was wandering around town, aimless and abandoned. Seriously, this guy right here? Totally AWESOME! You all know my affinity for the fat-heads, but it just isn’t my penchant for pinchable cheeks that drew me in, but rather magnificent Maury’s alluring aura and his gentlemanly nature. Born in late 2010, the marvelous specimen of all things feline somehow ended up homeless and in search of a place to call his own, when a Wyoming resident took it upon herself to take him in temporarily until we were able to.

 

Although upsetting, it was really no big surprise when this studmuffin tested a very strong FIV+, considering he was ‘all boy’ and had been roaming the mean streets for who knows how long. I don’t think Maury was the aggressor in any skirmishes he was involved in, but he did suffer a nasty injury to his left rear foot that tore one of his claws completely off, leaving him with a nasty, smelly infection that needed immediate treatment, lest he lose that toe. After antibiotics, neutering, flea treatment, vaccines and deworming, my handsome tuxedo (former) tomcat was ready, willing and able to head on down to our sanctuary and become an official Big Sid’s Kid.

 

Again, not astonishing that he made fast friends with anyone he came into contact with, charming the other cats and the volunteers alike with his come hither gaze, affability and eagerness to be best buds — forever! Of all of the newbies we had taken in in December of 2014, Maury adapted the easiest, settling in like a champ and quickly learning and engaging in the daily routines and rituals with great enthusiasm.

 

He is SUCH a gracious, gorgeous guy that you can’t help but fall for him, hook, line and sinker, within mere minutes of making his acquaintance. Maury is absolutely delightful and I speak for all of us when I say how thrilled we are to have him as one of our own, that is until we to find him the kind of purr-fect home he deserves!

MORE ABOUT MAURY PAWVICH

  • FIV+
  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Current on vaccinations

Want to adopt Maury Pawvich? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Get info about Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

Cat of the week: Heyward

By Sharon Wylie

Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


Dr. Jen happens to think that ALL Crash Cats are good looking, but this guy right here is one hot commodity—and so flipping handsome she could hardly contain herself when she gazed upon his gorgeousness!


Hunky Heyward (born in late 2011) ended up homeless and helpless in mid-October 2016, when a cat-lovin’ rescuer provided him with the safety and comfort of a really awesome outdoor coop she has set up for the strays she often comes across out in her northeast Grand Rapids neighborhood. When Dr. Jen had the extreme pleasure of welcoming him into the program on November 14, he was extremely shy and suffering from severe dental disease; in fact, the neutered male had pockets of pus present in his mouth and was missing many teeth that had literally rotted and fallen out sometime before his rescue.


Heyward was pretty scruffy and matted, probably from not being willing to groom himself scrupulously due to profound oral pain, so Dr. Jen spruced and fluffed him up while he was under anesthesia for his surgery. He looked and smelled SO much better once he woke up and was able to enthusiastically dive headfirst into bowl after bowl of yummy, soft food!


Once at the shelter, Heyward hunkered down in his two-story cat condo and refused any and all human contact for two whole weeks, though he delighted in the endless supply of meals and didn’t mind people speaking softly to him. Then, all of a sudden, at exactly the two-week mark, he waltzed on out of his cage and demanded affection—and he hasn’t stopped since!


He prefers to stay tucked away out of the limelight but will seek out attention when all is quiet in the shelter. He is especially fond of belly rubs and lap snuggles; it could be that once he feels comfy and cozy in his new, mellow home, he will offer his tummy up for major pets and warm the laps of those who have chosen to take a chance on him, take him home and love him up one side and down the other.


Heyward deserves to be doted on and adored, and he will most certainly reciprocate your kindness with unconditional love.


Want to adopt Heyward? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

Cat of the week: Rowdy

Rowdy is adoptable!

By Sharon Wylie

Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


Rowdy’s rescuer has a way with cats — even the most timid of tom cats can’t resist her gentleness and this guy was no exception, although it did take quite a bit of sweet talking to reel him in, after which the rescuer and her cousin carted him off to Focus on Ferals for evaluation and neutering in mid-March 2016.


Although he was none too pleased, in time he did manage to forgive her and allowed her to once again pet him. She bestowed upon him the name of ‘Rowdy’ (born in the fall of 2011), not because he was a hellion at heart but simply because he gave her such a hard time when it came to corralling him into a travel carrier. She chose the name Rowdy after the character Rowdy Yates from the classic Rawhide television show back in the day of Clint Eastwood’s prime.


Rugged and ragged are two words that aptly described this handsome hunk when he arrived at the clinic on March 28 as he was sporting a previously broken tail tip, missing a canine tooth, was filthy and grimy with a stud tail present (from being intact for so long), in dire need of dental cleaning and sporting a nasty bite wound on his chest.


As you can imagine, this guy probably had some harrowing tales to tell, but instead he chose to keep quiet, hunker down in the safety and confines of the cushy cage Dr. Jen set up for him, and rest and recover. Wary and battle-weary, the poor guy needed spiffing up before going down to the sanctuary to be spoiled; he tested positive for Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV).


Once at Big Sid’s, Rowdy settled in, though at times it appeared as though he was afraid of his own shadow. With not a mean bone in his handsome, hunky bod, it does take him time to warm up, relax under a gentle touch and get to know you. The volunteers are patiently guiding him through daily life at the free-roaming facility, where he is making furry friends and reveling in the fact that he doesn’t have anything to be frightened of; his fighting days are over and his life of luxury has begun.


The dozens of doting caretakers are professionals when it comes to reassuring the shy guys, so in time, Dr. Jen has no doubt that Rowdy will be rolling on the floor, showing off his belly and relishing the attention showered on him.

MORE ABOUT ROWDY

  • FIV-positive
  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Current on vaccinations

Want to adopt Rowdy? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Get info about Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

Cat of the week: Jheri

 

By Sharon Wylie

Crash’s Landing


Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


Hey! Remember Jheri Curls? (You’d have to be of a certain age.) Well, there’s a good reason Dr. Jen named this cutie ‘Jheri’.


Jheri’s saga began a few days before Christmas 2015 when Dr. Jen received a text from the Kent County Animal Shelter about an FIV+ kitty in need of transfer to Big Sid’s Sanctuary. The folks at the shelter told Dr. Jen that the fabulous feline in need was a lovable cat with loads of personality and, oh, by the way, he’s an American Curl. In Dr. Jen’s 13+ years of running a rescue, this was the first time she had encountered the breed.


Although Dr. Jen is not one to typically fall for a cat’s looks as it is what’s down deep down within that wins her over, she was completely smitten from the get-go.


“He could not be a more complete package of charisma, charm and adorableness,” said Dr. Jen. “If you are an ’80s lady like me, you are very familiar with the name reference — given how rare and uncommon his physical appearance is, I just had to bestow upon him a moniker as interesting as he is.”


Jheri only got to spend a few days at the clinic since Christmas vacation was almost underway, but in the time he and Dr. Jen were together, the fabulous feline roamed the halls and made his rounds, in spite of suffering from some sort of traumatic injury that caused one of his toes to swell and become infected. However, he was none the worse for wear and was raring to go the minute he set foot on the ground, assessing and “assisting” to the best of his abilities.


MORE ABOUT JHERI

  • FIV-positive
  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Current on vaccinations

Suffice it to say that everyone who met Jheri fell instantly in love with his laid-back demeanor and happy-go-lucky attitude. Once at the sanctuary, Jheri made it known that he didn’t want to be contained in the intake suite, so the shelter’s photographer had to get down there in a hurry to snap Jheri’s glamour shots so he could roam and explore. From the second he was allowed the freedom to prance and prowl around the two-story shelter, he was like a little kid at Christmas!


Learn the facts about FIV and FeLV here.


Want to adopt Jheri? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

 

 

 

 

Cat of the week: Mija

mija
A darling little girl with plenty of cattitude
By Sharon Wylie
Crash’s Landing

Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).


The freezing February of 2015 brought with it an onslaught of homeless cats trying to get in out of the cold. As it so happens, this little doll was displaced when her deadbeat owners moved out of their trailer and left her and a comrade behind, their only refuge the dark, dank and dismal underbelly of their previous home.


When a neighbor caught wind of what had happened, she brought the two inside, but having two elderly cats of her own, she wasn’t comfortable letting them mingle, nor could she keep them long term.

mija-2

Although displaced and a bit disheveled, Mija didn’t fare too badly except for being intact, flea-ridden and full of internal parasites. Mija (pronounced ‘Mee-Hah’) was born in the fall of 2012 and tested positive for Feline Leukemia (FeLV). Had Dr. Jen had not spayed her, she would have brought five FeLV-positive babies into the world as she was in the early stages of pregnancy.

This is one absolutely adorable little kitty. She possesses lots of calico ‘tude packed in a small package, likes to wander around, and makes a habit of walking up to MUCH bigger cats and letting them know that she’s the boss! It’s funny to watch the looks that these big boys give her. She is a people lover though. Pick her up and she’s a purr noodle.


What we don’t understand is how someone could have such blatant disregard for life and toss this kitty in the cold like she was garbage. Thankfully she is in a warm, safe place and the volunteers are doing everything in their power to promote how precious and perfect she is.


Granted, Mija’s viral status will make adoption a bit more challenging, but taking home a positive kitty IS a viable option provided safeguards are taken if you already have a multi-cat household. Given her propensity to spout off if someone gets in her face, we’re pretty sure she wouldn’t mind being the only cat in a residence that could devote attention solely to her.

Want to adopt Mija? Learn about the adoption process here. Fill out a pre-adoption form here.


Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Check out the Volunteer Informational Session on Dec. 11. If you’d like to get in on this kitty love fest, sign up for the Volunteer Informational Session. Take a tour of Crash’s, meet the kitties and learn how you can contribute your heart to our organization. RSVP to volunteer@crashslanding.org to reserve your spot.


Can’t adopt, but still want to help? Find out how you can sponsor a cat!


Learn the truth about FeLV here.


Big Sid’s is special because it is one of the largest shelters in the nation that caters exclusively to cats who test positive for FIV or FeLV. Read about Big Sid’s here.


Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

 

Cat of the Week: Gorgeous Galen

galen_021446
Meet gorgeous Galen!

Each week WKTV features an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).

 

By Sharon Wylie

 

This fabulous Feline Leukemia-Positive boy had been none too healthy when he first arrived at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic on Aug. 29, 2016, as a transfer from Montcalm County. Born in the summer of 2012, it’s a mystery as to how he ended up homeless and in need of help as he is absolutely one of the most laid-back, lovable lugs to saunter on into the sanctuary.

 

Although he was intact, filthy, flea-ridden, loaded with internal parasites and sporting a nasty bilateral ear infection that caused his eardrums to rupture, he was extremely affectionate, trusting and wanting nothing more than to snuggle.

 

It didn’t take too much to get him spiffed up and sent on down to Big Sid’s, but after about 10 days there, he developed a rip-roaring temperature of 106.8 degrees and was rushed back out to the clinic. Lab work revealed a profound inflammatory condition but unfortunately, antibiotics were not enough to control the fever; Dr. Jen had to go big and hit him hard with steroids and that worked.

 

A few days later, she was able to discharge this happy camper and get him back where he belonged, where he coerced all of the volunteers into giving him belly rubs and head pats overtime they turned around. He made his gentle, sweet presence known.

 

galen_021447
Get ready to fall in love…

Galen made himself right at home, meshing with the resident population as if he had always lived amongst them. He is such an easy-going, easy-on-the-eyes guy that you are immediately drawn to him, and cats and humans alike find themselves enjoying his company immensely.

 

Galen’s middle ear infection is resolving nicely and he is doing exceptionally well at Big Sid’s. Stress can exacerbate underlying medical conditions so the fact that he acclimated with ease really helped speed up his recovery process. He is handsome, happy and now so much healthier than when he first came on board.

 

Galen is adoptable! Go here to read about the adoption process and then fill out an application form here. Get info about Feline Leukemia here.

Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.

 

See Galen’s Petfinder bio here.

MORE ABOUT GALEN

  • FELV+
  • House trained
  • Spayed/Neutered
  • Current on vaccinations

Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.

Cat of the week: Meet Caspian!

caspian_021202

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WKTV is pleased to announce that each week we will feature an adoptable cat from Crash’s Landing or Big Sid’s Sanctuary. Both cat rescue organizations were founded by Jennifer Petrovich, DVM (Dr. Jen), who is on staff at Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic (4245 Clyde Park Ave SW).

Caspian

Just look at this handsome mug!

 

Not only is Caspian gorgeous, but more importantly, he is a genuine sweetheart who loves to snuggle — and is very good at it. This chubby-cheeked, squinty-eyed (former) Tom cat was welcomed into Big Sid’s this past Aug. 2 after being transferred from the Humane Society of SW Michigan.

 

Although he had seen a veterinarian three days after his arrival at the Humane Society in mid-July, the condition causing his lower eyelids to roll inward and rub on his corneas was not diagnosed, so the appropriate treatment was not undertaken; by the time Dr. Jen got her hands on this fabulous ‘fat-head’ (born in the summer of 2012), his right eye had suffered scarring and both lids were incredibly swollen and painful. He was FIV-positive and Dr. Jen also discovered that he had torn a toenail back to the base and was sparse in the hair coat department due to a flea infestation that has since been successfully treated.

 

Once at the sanctuary, Caspian immediately took to wooing the ladies; his heavy-lidded, half-closed glance made it appear as if he was gazing longingly at those who stepped into his line of sight, so the volunteers couldn’t help but swoon, swoop in and scoop him up for some major cuddle time — and at 13 pounds of muscle, he is quite an armful!

 

At his recheck exam on Sept. 6, Dr. Jen was dismayed to see that Caspian’s FIV test was still a firm positive, but since he was having a blast in his new home she had no worries. He had a second surgery on his eyelids and, as he did before, Caspian bounced back with flying colors, sporting fancy purple sutures once again for the next week.

 

He left the clinic with eyes wide open — something he hadn’t really done up to this point — weighing in at 14 pounds and showing off his lustrous, almost luminous coat that good nutrition and parasite control had afforded him.

 

Caspian still has a tiny scar remaining on his right eye but his vision isn’t impaired in the least; he can look deep into your soul with those baby blues and you will absolutely, paws-itively MELT!

Want to adopt Caspian? Go here to read about the adoption process and then fill out an application form here.

 

Caspian’s Petfinder bio is here.

 

Interested in volunteering at one of the cat shelters? Email volunteer@crashslanding.org.

 

Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary have a common mission: To take at-risk stray cats off the streets of the Greater Grand Rapids area, provide them with veterinary care and house them in free-roaming, no-kill facilities until dedicated, loving, permanent homes can be found.


 

‘Raise the Woof’ fundraising event to benefit Hearts of Hope Dog Rescue

waise-the-woof-e1476129731849Join Hearts of Hope Dog Rescue as they celebrate five years and 1,000 adoptions! The event will feature a cash bar, complimentary hors d’oeuvres, live music by local band Decoy, a photo booth and an opportunity for attendees to meet some of the dogs the organization is working to save.

 

It all happens Friday, Nov. 18 at 6:30 pm at The Intersection, 133 Grandville Ave. SW in Grand Rapids. Tickets are $10 prior to the event and $15 at the door. Get tickets here.

 


Hearts of Hope Dog Rescue is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization driven by a network of volunteer foster families in the Grand Rapids area. Because they are committed to saving the lives of unwanted dogs of all backgrounds, they are considered by many in the local dog community as the last line of support for dogs in need.


Why Adopt?

Thinking of adding a pet to your family? Here are five reasons to adopt your new best friend.

  • You’ll save a life.
  • You’ll get a healthy pet.
  • You’ll save money.
  • You’ll feel better.
  • You won’t be supporting puppy mills or pet stores.

Beautiful Bella is waiting for a home

bella
Courtesy of Lynae Marie PhotographyBella’s Info…

Beautiful Bella is a perfect girl! She is sweet, happy, playful and affectionate as well as being house-trained and crate-trained. She loves to play with her toys and go for long walks. Bella gets along great with her foster brother and the silly kitten too. Any dog siblings must be sure to like a playful jumpy pup, as she sometimes acts like the annoying little sister. With people Bella can start out shy, and loud noises and movements can make her a bit timid at times, but with reassurance, she knows it will all be OK. She is a total love and such a well-behaved girl. She is up to date on vaccines, microchipped and spayed. Her adoption fee is $200. Apply to adopt her here.

8th Annual ‘Whiskers & Wine Gala’ benefits Crash’s Landing cat rescue Nov. 18

whiskers-and-wine

 

The 8th Annual Whiskers & Wine Gala celebrates Crash’s Landing and Big Sid’s Sanctuary, two no-kill cat shelters that rescue strays off the streets of Greater Grand Rapids and find loving homes for them. Rescue founder, Jennifer Petrovich DVM of Clyde Park Veterinary Clinic, has been helping at-risk strays for 14 years.

 

On Friday, Nov. 18 from 5:30-9:30 pm, the organization’s largest fundraiser of the year kicks off at Thousand Oaks Gold Club, 4100 Thousand Oaks Dr. NE in Grand Rapids. The event includes a full dinner with wine, raffle drawings for gift baskets, and a live auction.

 

Doors open at 5:30 pm with dinner starting at 7 pm. Cost is $50 per person. Buy tickets online here. For more info, call 616.826.8038 or visit the website here.

 

Meow! The Amazing AcroCats came to Grand Rapids!

 

By Victoria Mullen

WKTV

 

More cowbell, Tuna. Oh, c’mon.

tuna-on-cowbell
Tuna on cowbell

“Tuna, more cowbell,” coaxed Samantha Martin as the proud, white cat raised her paw, looked Martin straight in the eye and then put her paw back down. “No cowbell for you,” the feline’s face seemed to convey.

 

At least not right at this moment.*

 

Tuna and her cohorts, the Amazing AcroCats were in Grand Rapids Oct. 16 and 17 for three performances at the Wealthy Theatre in Eastown. The troupe comprises regular, down-to-earth house cats rescued by Martin and trained to perform tricks of their choosing.

 

As Chief Executive Human, on any given day Martin oversees the well being of about 14 performing cats — and sometimes an abundance of kittens. On Martin’s cue, the cats perform tricks with skateboards, roll balls over parallel ropes, play the piano, strum the guitar and even read signs.

 

With a background in animal training, Martin has a natural affinity for animals, especially felines. She uses clicker training techniques to build better relationships and solve behavioral problems. Her career as animal circus master began in the ’80s with an act called the Amazing AcroRats. After a few years, she realized she wanted to do something more challenging when she decided, why not cats?

 

Kittens in the studio!!!!
Kittens in the studio!!!!

“Cats have a reputation for being notoriously difficult to train,” said Martin. “But I love a challenge.”

 

To Martin’s delight, she discovered that cats are highly trainable. The training method differs from that of dogs — cats prefer real treats (chicken, salmon) versus a paltry “good kitty!” after performing a trick.

 

There’s much more to the show than music and acrobatics, and each cat has an amazing rescue story. One was found behind a dumpster. Others were abandoned as tiny kittens. All are well cared for and loved by Martin and her colleagues.

 

“We’re devoted to promoting cat-training awareness,” Martin said. “We support feline adoption and rescue across the country. We usually travel with foster kittens and cats. Right now, we don’t have any as we’ve adopted the last group out.”

 

Martin brought some of her AcroCats came to WKTV’s studio on Saturday to share some tricks and tips on why it’s important to train your cat.

 

Samantha Martin and WKTV's Bill Jung
Samantha Martin and WKTV’s Bill Jung. Love the ears, Bill.

In the studio with Martin was Smudge, a kitten who came on board with a sibling just yesterday. Already he is in training to become an AcroCat.

 

“I start training them as soon as they can eat solid food,” said Martin. “I observe to see what each cat likes to do and then build upon that using clicker training.”

 

Already Smudge is exhibiting some great paw action. Surely he has a promising future.

 

*Seconds later, Tuna did more cowbell. What a tease.

 

Lunch is on Wyoming residents as way to say thanks to police, fire

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Two special luncheons were not only designed to say thank you to the many first responders who helped with a July 15 fire, but also an opportunity for residents of Bayberry Farms Apartments to heal.

 

“We really wanted to show our appreciation for all that the Wyoming police officers and firefighters did for us,” said Catherine Kooyers, a resident of Bayberry Farms Apartments and one of the organizers of the event that took place earlier this month.

 

img_6099“By being able to say thank you, the residents are able to put closure on what happened and heal from the entire event.”

 

It was July 15 when a call went out that there was a fire at the Bayberry Farms Apartments, a Wyoming senior-living complex located at 2520 56th St. SW. “Earlier that day, we had just had the fire department here but it turned out to be nothing,” Kooyers said. However, the mid-afternoon fire was much more serious as smoke started to fill the apartment complex. Kooyers, who lives in an apartment that was near where the fire started, ran through the building knocking on doors and trying to get people out.

 

“Because of the earlier incident, some people didn’t think the second situation was all that serious,” Kooyers said.

 

Along with tenants, firefighters and police, workers from the nearby businesses came over to help with the evacuation.

 

“I heard a knock on the door but didn’t pay that much attention to it,” said resident Ellen Vining. “I heard another knock, much harder and decided I needed to answer it.

 

“There was a young lady telling me that I needed to get out. She was all dressed in blue so I thought she was one of the firefighters.”

 

Vining later learned that person was a Monelli’s employee who was coming in for her shift when she saw the smoke and came over to help.

 

“I learned a very valuable lesson that day,” Vining said with a chuckle. “Don’t ignore a knock on the door.”

 

Because of the organization of the tenants it made it easier for the department to assess who was missing which in turned meant the lost of only a pet, said Wyoming Deputy Chief Brian Bennett. Three people were taken to the hospital to be checked out. Three units suffered the most damage with the entire building having smoke and water damage.

 

img_6098It has taken several months, but most of the residents have been able to move back home and with the fire behind them, the tenants felt now was a good time to show their appreciation to the police officers and firefighters with the special luncheons.

 

“It is always nice when you are able to come back and visit with those who you were able to help and learn what has happened since the fire,” Bennett said. “A lot of times, we are in and out and we do not get that chance to talk to the residents and see how they are doing afterwards.”

 

“I am so impressed with all of them,” Vining said. “They all have such compassion which I guess that is why they became firefighters.”

No need to raise a stink — the bugs are already here

stink-bug-courtesy-photo-david-r-lance-bugwood-org
Meet Mr. Stinky, the source of all this brouhaha

The stink bugs are coming! The stink bugs are coming! (Oh, wait. They’re already here.)

 

Well, just don’t you panic — it’s that time of year (you know, like shedding season for Fluffy and Fido), when the little buggers look for a warm place to hibernate for winter — in your home. Can you blame them?

 

Wait! Who? What?

Specifically, it’s the brown marmorated stink bugs that are raising such a stink in lower Michigan. Remember last fall, when we were asked to report any sightings of these guys in our homes? Yeah, me neither, but apparently Michigan residents were asked to report sightings, and apparently there were enough sightings to warrant an official decree: marmorated stink bugs are well-established as a nuisance pest in homes in the southern Lower Peninsula of Michigan.

 

It makes sense when you think about it. The little guys want to stay warm during the cold months and don’t worry, they promise to leave in the spring if they can find their way back out. If they do make it back out, they’ll look for plants to eat and lay their eggs outside.

 

Seriously, there is no cause for worry. They are not nesting, laying eggs or feeding on you, your pets or anything in your house. I repeat: They are harmless to pets and humans. They just want a warm place to rest their sweet little mandibles.

 

Who ARE these guys, anyway?

The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hempitera: Pentatohalyomorpha_halysmidae), is an invasive insect native to Japan and Asia. It was first discovered in Michigan in 2011. Since then they have been slowly spreading throughout the state. In addition to causing damage to plants and fruit, the little stinkers are a major nuisance because adult stink bugs often seek shelter inside houses and other buildings in the fall. Once inside, they congregate almost anywhere. Although they will not cause structural damage or reproduce in homes or bite people or pets, and although they are not known to transmit disease or cause physical harm, the insect produces a pungent, malodorous chemical and when handling the bug, the odor is transferred readily.

 

Oh, my! What should I do?

  1. Don’t panic. We said that upfront, but it bears repeating.
  2. Look for gaps around window air conditioners or holes in window screens and block them off — these little stinkers love these easy access points.
  3. The easiest, non-toxic way to dispose of them is with a couple inches of soapy water in a bucket — the soap prevents them from escaping the water. Yup, just sweep ’em into the bucket and they will drown in the soapy water, which you can then dump outside. Or you can do the same with a Shop-Vac — add the soapy water to the canister before vacuuming them up with the Shop-Vac. (You may want to use an old, junker vacuum for this purpose because the bugs may live up to their name and “stink up” your vacuum.)
  4. Report how many you’ve seen at a given location using the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network. If you have trouble entering the information on the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network website, leave a message for Julianna Wilson via email at jkwilson@msu.edu or by phone at 517.432.4766 with your name, address (or nearest crossroads), the date you saw them, and how many you have seen.

stink-bug-map

The map above shows where reports have been made to the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network of brown marmorated stink bugs in the Lower Peninsula since Sept. 25, 2015.

 

(Call me crazy, but I posit that if these guys didn’t go around stinking things up, nobody would have been the wiser.)

 

 

 

This all-feline band is the cat’s meow! See them purrform Oct. 16 & 17 in GR

aacircus
The Amazing Acro-Cats are coming to Grand Rapids (photo courtesy of the Acro-Cats website)

 

By Victoria Mullen

WKTV

 

Coming to Grand Rapids October 16 and 17 are the Amazing Acro-Cats, a Chicago-based troupe of real rescued house cats. These fabulous felines perform a plethora of feats with their fancy footwork: they jump through hoops, ride on skateboards, ring bells, rolling barrels, walk the high wire, climb on ropes and more. Anyone who has tried herding cats will appreciate the time, love and patience that goes into training these kitty athletes.

 

But wait! There’s more. The only all-cat band in the entire world — Tuna and the Rock Cats — purrforms as the finale. You don’t want to miss this.

 

One of the four “cat shows” in the U.S., the Amazing Acro-Cats and their human staff are devoted to promoting cat-training awareness and supporting feline adoption and rescue across the country. Their mission and goal are to show cat lovers how to improve their relationship with their furrever friends through positive reinforcements that yield long-lasting and beneficial behaviors.

 

See their performance on Animal Planet:

 

 

The troupe of former orphans and strays travel from city to city in a custom cat bus and form partnerships that encourage fostering and finding homes for cats and kittens.

 

Tickets are $22-$32. Get your tickets here.

 

When: 1 pm & 5 pm Sunday, Oct. 16; 7 pm Monday, Oct. 17

 

acro-catsWhere: Peter Wege Auditorium, 1130 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids, Mich. 49506

 

Duration: 1 hour, 30 minutes

 

 Photos courtesy of The Acro-Cats website.

Humane Society Pet of the Week: May

Courtesy of Green Dog Photography
Courtesy of Green Dog Photography

By: Kimberly Thomas

 

Meet May! She is a 7 year old Pit Bull Terrier mix. May is a laid-back lady who would do best in a respectful household with older children because she is so polite and gentle.

 

May takes her time to get to know a new person, and once she has, May will have you playing tug-of-war within minutes! If you’re interested in May, please visit the Humane Society of West Michigan located at 3077 Wilson Dr NW, Grand Rapids, MI 49534.