Category Archives: Education

Music’s part in life’s harmony

Fuentes is a professor of music at Calvin College and he also enjoys composing music for theater, television and the concert hall. (Photo courtesy Calvin College.)

By Hannah Ebeling, Calvin College


David Fuentes believes it is impossible to find a piece of music that is not about who we are and what we care about. “In fact, I even offer $500 to any student that can find one,” said the music professor. “I’m not out any money yet.”


Fuentes addresses this in his writing for, Vocation across the Academy, a book collaboration with NetVUE, a nationwide network of colleges and universities. NetVUE is working to create resources that empower students in vocational exploration, said Fuentes. Fuentes contributed chapter five, “To whom do I sing, and why,” addressing the place of music in human flourishing.


Fuentes began his musical journey when his mother picked up his first instrument, an accordion, at a garage sale. From then on, said Fuentes, he had a knack for music and liked making up his own songs. Since then, Fuentes has enjoyed composing music for theater, television and the concert hall as well as teaching a number of Calvin’s music courses.

Music as vocation

The topic of vocation is particularly important to Fuentes because part of his job is to help students uncover their personal calling and understand how much of their lives will be directly related to music. “For some this will be 100 percent, for others it will be a smaller part,” he said.


Fuentes believes the way students approach education has changed over the years. In the past, it was about learning reasoning and critical thinking, he said. Then, in whatever field you pursue, you would be pulling from a pool of knowledge. “Students today are trying to be practical about what they are going to go into. If they don’t have a job right out of college, they feel like a failure.”


Fuentes said students are often so focused on finding a career that they forget to ask: What are my gifts and loves? How can I contribute to God’s Kingdom? Educating students about vocation helps them fine-tune and understand all of their giftings, he said. It also gives students permission or a calling to help people.


“I have been nervous about pursuing music as a major for the longest time, but I definitely felt more comfortable after taking his class,” said Alexia White, a student of Fuentes.

Why music matters

Each semester Fuentes asks his students: Why does music matter in human lives? Are people just listening because they like it or is there something deeper?


“I assumed that when I took this class it would be about how music is only meant to bring glory and honor to God,” said White. “But Professor Fuentes helped us understand how that can be one purpose for music, but music can help us explain our biblical worldview. Music can teach us about God, others and ourselves.”


In the chapter he wrote in Vocation across the Academy, Fuentes tackles the issues of artists creating only for self-expression and audiences expecting a profound emotional experience with every artistic encounter. According to Fuentes, this is only a small part of what music can do.


“Sometimes people use music to escape; music is good at that. We go into a different state of mind and can experience great emotion there. On the other hand, music can help us delve into issues,” said Fuentes. “The deepest and most profound emotions come when we realize something. Rather than escaping from reality, music can bring us deeper into reality,” said Fuentes.


“There are two basic ways human beings make sense of the world: rationality and intuition,” said Fuentes. “Music brings those two together beautifully.”


Copyright Calvin College, reprinted by permission.

Baby animals are adorable — but leave ’em alone, OK?

A possum family

By Blandford Nature Center and Victoria Mullen

 

Aw, isn’t that baby animal just adorable? Maybe you’re tempted to scoop him up and turn him into a pet — after all, he must be starving, because mom isn’t around, right?

 

Not necessarily. In fact, if you intervene, you could make things a lot worse.

Baby mammals

Mammal babies are usually born naked with their eyes shut and require a lot of care from their parents. People are often tempted to take in mammal babies and try to raise the babies themselves. This is a bad idea. Not only is it illegal to do so without the proper permits, but it is dangerous for the animal and yourself for multiple reasons:

 

Misfeeding or Dietary troubles

People will try to feed mammal babies, and they will often end up having the babies choke to death on the food. Many people are under the misguided impression that since it is a baby animal, they should get milk from the store and feed that to it; however, only humans and cows can digest cows’ milk! Baby animals are lactose intolerant, which means that drinking milk will cause diarrhea, which may result in death (due to dehydration and lack of nutrition).

 

Mammals can carry a variety of diseases.

For example, raccoons can carry distemper, rabies, and a roundworm parasite that can be transmitted to other mammals, including humans. The parasite finds its way into the body and can burrow into the brain.

 

Squirrel siblings

Another problem is that of imprinting.

People who don’t know how to properly rehabilitate animals will end up with imprinted babies — even skilled rehabbers can have problems with imprinting babies. So, when the cute baby mammal turns into a mean adult mammal, and you try to release it, it can come right back and not be afraid of you, other humans, or people’s dogs and cats. Imprinting makes it easier for these animals to be hunted or injured, and there have been attacks on people by imprinted animals, particularly children.

About bunnies

Baby rabbits are often found in backyards. Rabbits will make nests in shallow depressions in the ground, in grassy areas. These areas are often near edges of forest, by fences, and under shrubs. Before you mow the lawn or rototill your garden, you should check the area for rabbit nests, and if you find one, just work around it and wait a few weeks; the babies will be ready to leave and get out of your way.

 

Bunnies are born with their eyes closed and no fur. Their ears are close to their head. Bunnies are on their own when they are around 5 inches long and furry, with their eyes open and ears up. They may still hang out with each other near the nest for awhile before going their separate ways. You don’t want to bring these older bunnies to a wildlife rehabber, since they don’t need help, and bunnies tend to become stressed out very easily and could die from just the transport to a rehab center. It’s a good idea to make sure they need help before trying to help them, or you could do more harm than good.

 

Baby bunnies

If you find a nest with bunnies inside that are too young to be on their own, unless they look injured, leave them alone. The mother will come back, but not until dusk and dawn. So, you won’t see her coming back to the nest. If you’re worried that the mother isn’t coming back to the nest, put flour around the nest and place some twigs in an X formation over the nest, and check back the next morning. If the flour and/or twigs have been disturbed, the mother hasn’t abandoned her babies. If you happen to touch one of the babies, just put it back and gently touch the others so they all smell the same. The mother will still accept them, just make sure you don’t handle them much.

 

It is not a good idea to move a rabbit nest, but if you can’t wait a week or two for them to leave, or if you have already disturbed the nest, you can try to move it. You should move it to an area as close as possible to the original location, in an area that has some longish grass, possibly under a shrub. Put the fur that was in the old nest in the new one, and cover the bunnies with dry grass. Again wait till the morning to see if the nest was visited by the mother, using flour and twigs.

 

For info on other baby animals, go here.

 

 

Empowering communities through women’s health

In July 2017, Adejoke Ayoola will collaborate with faculty at Bowen University in addressing issues of reproductive health in Iwo, Nigeria. (Photo courtesy Calvin College.)

By Hannah Ebeling, Calvin College


“The world is a global village. When the Lord equips you with skills or knowledge, you can easily transfer those gifts to bless other people around the world,” said Adejoke Ayoola, professor of nursing.


This year, Ayoola was selected for the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program. In July she will travel to Iwo, Nigeria, and begin a project in collaboration with faculty at Bowen University.

Equipping women, promoting health

Over a period of 33 days, Ayoola will address issues of reproductive health in the community. She will visit both the homes of local women as well as Bowen classrooms in order to equip women with reproductive knowledge and pregnancy planning skills. In addition, Ayoola will act as an adviser in the design of a women’s health center.


She also plans to work with Bowen faculty and staff in community research efforts and in the development of nursing curriculum. “I am passionate about the next generation of nurses, here at Calvin and across the world,” said Ayoola. Since Bowen’s nursing program is less than four years old, she looks forward to seeing it grow and expand in future years.


Ayoola is excited about the work she will be doing in her home country, Nigeria. “I see it as my vocation, as my God calling. This will be an opportunity to use what I’ve learned to care for women and share my knowledge with another institution,” said Ayoola.


Ayoola believes the previous experience she gained at Calvin College facilitating both the Preconception Reproductive Knowledge Promotion Program and the H.E.A.L.T.H Camp (Health, Education, and Leadership Training for a Hopeful future) equipped her with the tools needed to design reproductive health programs at Bowen University.

Collaboration with community

After sharing how she has been promoting women’s health in her own community, Ayoola inquired about the needs of Bowen University and the local community. She hopes to be able to utilize her own skillset in the creation of an entirely unique program for the women of Iwo, Nigeria.


“We will not be truly addressing the issue if we go in with our own preconceived ideas,” said Ayoola.


Ayoola is going to great lengths to understand the needs of the community she will be serving before initiating a project, and she says it is vital that the people who will be using the center are involved in its establishment. “The community has to own it, design it and implement it for the project to be relevant, effective and sustained,” said Ayoola.


Ayoola and her team will be using a variety of community-based research methods in order to ensure the project will be as effective as possible. One way they hope to gain insight is through surveys. “We need to use those as a way of listening to the communities needs and involving them in the process,” said Ayoola.

Opportunity for growth

Ayoola says at the heart of this project is the promotion of scholarship, research, community collaboration and cultural exchange. She believes this project will expand into a long-term partnership and sees the possibility of collaborations with another faith-based institution in the future.


Although she is not working with Calvin students on this project, Ayoola predicts in the coming years there will be opportunities for students to visit the center. “This is the beginning of so many great things that fit with what we are called to here, at Calvin.”


Copyright Calvin College, reprinted by permission.

Wyoming High names Hope College’s Sigler as new football coach

New Wyoming High School football coach Irvin Sigler, at his introductory press conference Tuesday, June 20. (WKTV/K.D. Norris)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

Wyoming High School’s new head football coach will be Irvin Sigler III, a Michigan Man who comes to the school after most recently serving as the offensive coordinator at Division III Hope College, Wyoming Public Schools announced today at a mid-day press conference.

 

Sigler was a graduate assistant at University of Michigan in the early 1990s while earning his master’s degree.

 

Sigler will succeed as Sam Becker, who left Wyoming after two years to take the head coaching position at Kenowa Hills High School. Becker took over a Wolves program that had a combined 1-17 record in the two years prior and led them to records of 3-6 in 2015 and 5-4 in 2016.

 

From left to right, Nate Robrahn, Wyoming high principal; Ted Hollern, Wyoming Public Schools athletic director; Irvin Sigler, new Wolves head football coach; and Dr. Thomas Reeder, WPS superintendent. (Supplied.)

“Coach Sigler provides us the opportunity to build upon work already started rather than to start over,” Wyoming Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Thomas Reeder said in supplied material. “He will take the program to an even higher level.”

 

Sigler will be the high school’s dean of students as well as leading the Wolves football program.

 

“As I told the kids this morning,” Sigler said at the press conference. “There are three things I strive to do, when I work with young people: Number 1 to be a great roll model, two to be a great teacher, and three to be the kind of coach that gets the best out of every player. That’s my goal, here, and I intend to do it for a long time. I intend to make a home here at Wyoming.”

 

Sigler has coached at both the high school and collegiate levels.

 

Prior to Hope College, he was an assistant head football coach and assistant track coach at Grand Rapids Christian schools, from 2013-15.  He served as head football coach at Jenison High School from 2008-12. His prior coaching experiences include Kell High School in Marietta, Ga., Grandville High School from 1998-2004, and Cadillac High School from 1993-97.

 

In addition to his head coaching duties, Sigler has experience teaching both physical education and Social Studies.

 

“Outside of getting an excellent football coach, one of the things that is most exciting is the additional things that Coach Sigler brings to the table,” Wyoming Public Schools Athletic Director Ted Hollern said in supplied material.

 

“It is a tremendous opportunity for our community and all our kids,” Hollern said at the press conference. “Some of the initiatives that he has done in the past that he will bring to Wyoming, will be absolutely terrific, especially in regards to his leadership programs … academic programs he plans on bringing, that he has brought to other schools, that he plans on bringing to Wyoming high school. … And one of his biggest goals is for the opportunity to teach young people to become great citizens.”

 

Sigler’s coaching accomplishments, in addition to his time at U-M, include MHSAA Regional Coach of the Year in 2001 and 2003 while at Grandville, the MHSFCA Community Service Award in 2009. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences from Adrian College in 1990 and his Master of Science in Kinesiology from the University of Michigan in 1992.

 

Sigler’s wife Erin is a sixth-grade teacher at Bauerwood Elementary in Jenison. They have four children: Tyler, Caden, Sydney and Riley.

 

Get ’em outside: Godfrey-Lee Early Childhood Center opens outdoor learning lab

Godfrey-Lee Early Childhood Center math coach Debbie Schuitema, right, and David Britton, retiring superintendent of Godfrey-Lee Public Schools, could not keep the students at the from jumping the gun on the ribbon cutting of a new outdoor classroom. (WKTV/K.D. Norris)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

There was a classroom full of kids playing outdoors of the Godfrey-Lee Early Childhood Center building Thursday, June 8, as the school district held the grand opening of its new Outdoor Learning Lab.

 

The adults present — including the incoming superintendents of Godfrey-Lee Public Schools — spoke about the “educational” advantages of the facility. The kids? They just liked being able to climb on things and roll down a hill and dig in the sand.

 

And that is just the way the two teachers who spearheaded the project — Debbie Schuitema and Julie Swanson — wants it: an outdoor education opportunity that looks a lot like play.

 

Debbie Schuitema, left, and Julie Swanson. (WKTV)

“Students are naturally curious, and when you bring them out here, without books, when you take a way some of the parameters, and rules and procedures, you allow them to be creative, curious and intuitive,” Schuitema, who teaches math at the center, said to WKTV. “The things they come up with is just amazing, and that leads to more learning. You can take that back inside and build on that.”

 

The facility, located to the east side of the Early Childhood Center (ECC) building at 961 Joosten SW in Wyoming, includes mostly natural objects which kids can explore and play with: a tree stump, a stone and sand structure, a grassy hill.

 

And Swanson, a physical education instructor at the center, knows the value of outdoor exercise as part of a student’s educational process.

 

“Discover yourself through play,” Swanson said. “Just something as simple as which way to you hold a big branch, little side up or big side up? They are learning engineering skills, math skills. … They learn gravity by rolling down a hill. … Really just discovering a new way to learn, but they don’t know they are learning. … (We are just) removing the walls.”

 

The grand opening event featured permanent and temporary activities such as a mud kitchen, rock grotto, climbing hill, landscape berm, covered gathering space/stage, dead tree stands, Congo drums, weaving loom and log steps.

 

David Britton, left, and incoming new superintendent Kevin Polston. (WKTV/K.D. Norris)

But the most important things the facility brings is the ability just to be outdoors, according to soon-to-retire district superintendent David Britten, who was present at the event along with the incoming new superintendent Kevin Polston.

 

“Kids today are spending far too much time indoors — it is a criticism of education in general. We are far too focused on content learning and memorization and test taking,” said Britten, who was a big supporter of the project. “We have lost some of these outdoor areas, places for kids to play in.

 

“So, as I walked along here a few years back, looking for historical artifacts, I thought: What a great place to have kids come out on a regular basis, and learn,” he said. “Find what native plant species that are here, what are invasive; what kind of birds and animals live in this environment. How can we make it better for them? How can we keep plaster creek clean? How can we protect the environment itself, so we can all enjoy it.”

 

Aside from the support of the superintendent, other supporters thanked at the facility opening include Women Who Care Grand Rapids, City of Wyoming Public Works, Dykema Excavators, DeWitt Landscape and Design, TonTin Lumber and The Stone Zone.

 

Special thanks were also given to East Lee students, Lee Middle School students, the Plaster Creek Watershed, Groundswell and — especially — the Godfrey Lee Board of Education.

 

“So many different people donated their time and energy to this,” said Swanson. “The Godfrey-Lee board of education, allowing us to do this without strings attached — that allowed us to be so creative. We really want to thank our board and our superintendent.”

 

WKTV’s high school coverage takes week off, but live action available

Softball is just one of several high school sports nearing the end of their season. Catch a game today!

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

There are plenty of local high school sports events to check out this week — including the beginnings of state playoffs for tennis and track — but the WKTV truck and crews will not be back covering games until next week.

 

The final spring game coverage will be:

Wednesday, May 24 – Boys Baseball, Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat later in the week — Wednesday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

The complete list of local high school sports events this week due to spring break is as follows:

 

Monday, May 15

Boys baseball

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Christian

Kelloggsville @ Belding

South Christian @ Covenant Christian – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ Potter’sHouse – DH

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Cristian – DH

Kelloggsville @ Belding – DH

South Christian @ Covenant Christian – DH

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls soccer

Godwin Heights @ Covenant Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming @ FH Eastern

West Michigan Aviation @ Fruitport Calvary

South Christian @ Christian

Belding @ Wyoming Lee

Boys golf

Comstock Park @ Wyoming

East Kentwood @ Muskegon Mona Shores

Girls tennis

South Christian @ Zeeland East

 

Tuesday, May 16

Girls Tennis

Western Michigan Christian @ Kelloggsville

North Muskegon @ South Christian

Boys baseball

Wyoming @ Kenowa Hills

Middleville T-K @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville – DH

Girls softball

Wyoming @ Kenowa Hills – DH

Middleville T-K @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville – DH

Girls soccer

Hudsonville Hornets @ West Michigan Aviation

Tri-Unity Christian @ Holland Calvary

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Boys golf

Caledonia @ East Kentwood – OK Red Jamboree @ Stone Water

 

Wednesday, May 17

Girls soccer

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights

Wyoming @ Wayland

Wyoming Lee @ Calvin Christian

Boys golf

Kelloggsville – OK Silver Conference Tournament at The Meadows

Wyoming @ FH Eastern – OK Gold Jamboree @ Egypt Valley

South Christian @ FH Eastern – OK Gold Jamboree @ Egypt Valley

Boys baseball

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

Tri-Unity Christian vs Holland Black River @ Fifth Third Ballpark – DH

Belding @ Wyoming Lee

Girls softball 

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

Belding @ Wyoming Lee

 

Thursday, May 18

Boys baseball

Tri-Unity Christian @ Godwin Heights

West Michigan Aviation @ Potter’s House

South Christian @ Middleville T-K

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Boys lacrosse

Catholic Central @ South Christian

Girls soccer

East Grand Rapids @ South Christian

Tri-Unity Christian @ Holland Black River

Rockford @ East Kentwood

Girls tennis

East Kentwood vs TBD @ Holland – MHSAA State Regionals

Girls softball

Rockford @ East Kentwood

 

Friday, May 19

Boys and girls track

Division 1 MHSAA State Regionals @ Kalamazoo-Loy Norrix

Division 2 MHSAA State Regionals @ Houseman Field

Division 3 MHSAA State regionals @ Saugatuck

Division 4 MHSAA State Regionals @ Holton

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park

Ottawa Hills @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming @ West Ottawa – DH

South Christian @ Zeeland East – DH

Girls soccer

Godwin Heights @ Belding

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Boys baseball

Godwin Heights @ Union

West Michigan Aviation @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming @ West Ottawa – DH

Girls tennis

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park

Kelloggsville @ Christian – MHSAA State Regionals

Girls water polo

@ TBA – MHSAA State Regionals

 

Saturday, May 20

Boys baseball

West Michigan Aviation @ Bloomingdale – DH

Auburn Hills Oakland Christian @ Potter’s House – DH

East Kentwood @ Lakeview – DH

Zion Christian @ Mason County Eastern

Zion Christian @ Western Michigan Christian

Wyoming Lee @ Saranac

Girls soccer

Zion Christian @ West Michigan Aviation

Boys and girls track

Division 1 MHSAA State Regionals @ Kalamazoo-Loy Norrix

Division 2 MHSAA State Regionals @ Houseman Field

Division 4 MHSAA State Regionals @ Holton

Girls water polo

@ TBA – MHSAA State Regionals

Girls softball

Muskegon Reeths-Puffer @ East Kentwood – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Saranac

Boys golf

East Kentwood vs TBA @ The Mines

 

Monday, May 22

Boys baseball

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights

South Christian @ Unity Christian

Kenowa Hills @ East Kentwood

Hopkins @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls softball

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights – DH

FH Central @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Kenowa Hills

Hopkins @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls soccer

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

Belding @ Kelloggsville

West Michigan Aviation @ Barry County Christian

Wyoming Lee @ Hopkins

Boys golf

Wyoming @ Christian – OK Gold Conference Meet @ Thornapple Pointe

South Christian @ Christian – OK Gold Conference Meet @ Thornapple Pointe

Girls soccer

South Christian @ Middleville T-K

 

WKTV’s featured high school coverage hits local baseball diamonds

High school baseball and softball seasons are in full swing. Check out a ball game. (WKTV)

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

There are plenty of local high school sports events to check out this week, and the weather is supposed to take a turn for the better.

 

The WKTV truck and crews continue this week its May schedule of high school sporting event coverage, with the rest of the tentative schedule being:

 

Monday, May 8 – Boys Baseball, Belding @ Kelloggsville

Tuesday May 9 – Boys Baseball, Caledonia @ East Kentwood

Wednesday, May 24 – Boys Baseball, Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on later in the week — the Tuesday games will be rebroadcast Wednesdays at 5 p.m., and the Wednesday and Thursday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

The complete list of local high school sports events this week due to spring break is as follows:

 

Monday, May 8

Boys Baseball

Belding @ Godwin Heights

NorthPointe Christian @ Kelloggsville

Zion Christian @ West Michigan Aviation

Girls softball

Belding @ Godwin Heights – DH

NorthPointe Christian @ Kelloggsville

Girls soccer

Calvin Christian @ Godwin Heights

Byron Center @ Kelloggsville

South Christian @ Wyoming

West Michigan Aviation @ Algoma Christian

Tri-Unity Christian @ Hudsonville Hornets

FH Central @ East Kentwood

Ravenna @ Zion Christian

Wyoming Lee @ NorthPointe Christian

Boys golf

Kelloggsville @ Belding

Girls tennis

Kelloggsville @ Catholic Central

East Kentwood @ Grandville

Boys Lacrosse

South Christian @ Jenison

Boys/girls track

@ Wyoming Lee – Cornerstone University Showcase

 

Tuesday, May 9

Boys baseball

Wayland @ Wyoming – DH

South Christian @ East Grand Rapids – DH

GR Crusaders @ Tri-Unity Christian

Caledonia @ East Kentwood – DH

Holland Calvary @ Zion Christian – DH

Girls Softball 

Wayland @ Wyoming – DH

South Christian @ East Grand Rapids – DH

Caledonia @ East Kentwood – DH

Girls soccer

Grand River Prep @ Calvary Christian

Potter’s House @ Algoma Christian

Hope Academy @ Tri-Unity Christian

Holland Calvary @ Zion Christian

East Kentwood @ Muskegon Mona Shores

Boys golf

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville – OK Red Jamboree

Girls water polo

East Kentwood @ Grand Ledge

 

Wednesday, May 10

Boys baseball

Calvin Christian@ Godwin Heights

Rockford @ South Christian – DH

Wyoming Lee @ NorthPointe Christian

Girls softball

Calvin Christian @ Godwin Heights

Rockford @ South Christian – DH

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Wyoming Lee @ NorthPointe Christian

Girls soccer

Godwin Heights @ Hopkins

Wyoming Lee @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming @ East Grand Rapids

Wayland @ South Christian

Girls tennis

Kelloggsville @ Coopersville

NorthPointe Christian @ South Christian

Boys golf

Wyoming @ South Christian – OK Gold Jamboree @ Railside

Boys/girls track

Wyoming @ Wayland

South Christian @ Wayland

 

Thursday, May 11

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ Plainwell – DH

Tri-County @ Kelloggsville

Hamilton @ Wyoming

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Boys baseball

Tri-County @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming @ Wayland

Grand River Prep @ Potter’s House

East Grand Rapids @ South Christian

Kalamazoo Cougars @ Tri-Unity Christian

East Kentwood @ Caledonia

Boys golf

Hamilton @ Wyoming

Boys/girls track

West Michigan Aviation @ Ravenna

Girls soccer

West Michigan Aviation @ Grand River Prep

East Kentwood @ West Ottawa

Girls tennis

Wayland @ East Kentwood

 

Friday, May 12

Boys/girls track

Godwin Heights @ Belding – OK Silver Conference Tournament

Kelloggsville @ Belding – O Silver Conference Tournament

Wyoming Lee @ Belding – OK Silver Conference Tournament

East Kentwood @ Rockford – OK Red Conference Tournament

Boys baseball

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park

West Michigan Aviation @ Kalamazoo Cougars – DH

Girls soccer

Zion Christian @ Godwin Heights

Wyoming @ Hudsonville Hornets

South Christian @ Zeeland East

Potter’s House @ Fruitport Calvary Christian

Algoma Christian @ Tri-Unity Christian

Boys golf

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian – OK Silver Jamboree @ The Pines

Northview @ Wyoming

Boys lacrosse

South Christian @ Kenowa Hills

Girls water polo

East Kentwood @ TBA – Districts

 

Saturday, May 13

Boys golf

Kelloggsville @ Hamilton

East Kentwood @ East Lansing

Girls tennis

Kelloggsville @ Spring Lake – OK Silver Conference Tournament

Wyoming @ FH Eastern – OK Gold Conference Meet

South Christian @ FH Eastern – OK Gold Conference Meet

East Kentwood @ Rockford – OK Red Conference Meet

Boys baseball

West Michigan Aviation @ Kelloggsville – Liz Jensen Memorial Tournament

South Christian @ Zeeland East

Tri-Unity Christian @ Zion Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Jenison – DH

Girls softball

Hastings @ Kelloggsville – Liz Jensen Memorial Tournament

Wyoming Lee @ Kelloggsville – Liz Jensen Memorial Tournament

South Christian @ Hudsonville

Boys/girls track

Wyoming @ Houseman Field – OK Gold Conference Meet

South Christian @ Houseman Field – OK Gold Conference Meet

 

Monday, May 15

Boys baseball

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Christian

Kelloggsville @ Belding

South Christian @ Covenant Christian – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ Potter’sHouse – DH

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Cristian – DH

Kelloggsville @ Belding – DH

South Christian @ Covenant Christian – DH

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls soccer

Godwin Heights @ Covenant Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming @ FH Eastern

West Michigan Aviation @ Fruitport Calvary

South Christian @ Christian

Belding @ Wyoming Lee

Boys golf

Comstock Park @ Wyoming

East Kentwood @ Muskegon Mona Shores

Girls tennis

South Christian @ Zeeland East

 

Summer fun activities abound in Grand Rapids

By Jeremy Witt

 

There is absolutely no excuse to be bored this summer, not with the variety of offerings from local schools and organizations.

Compass College in Grand Rapids offers interested participants help in making a movie this summer. Learn from professionals how to act on camera and make films in their Summer Film and Acting camps. Running from June 19th to 23rd, these camps are designed for teens ages 13 to 18. Each camp offers a completely different experience: as a Film Camp student, you’ll write, shoot, and edit your own short film with guidance from seasoned filmmakers; in Acting Camp, you’ll work on perfecting on-camera acting techniques with a film actor as your coach, and then star in a film produced by Film Camp. At the end of the week, walk the red carpet as the films premiere for family and friends on the big screen.


The Downtown Market in Grand Rapids has three- and four-day summer camps for the young foodie in your life. Camps are offered starting in late June and run through the beginning of August. Each camp has a distinct theme, ranging from Michigan’s fruits and vegetables to creating and utilizing a backyard farm. Sign up today for what Downtown Market cleverly calls their “Simmer Camps”.


Grand Rapids Treetop Adventure Park is hosting its first ever Treetop Climbing Camp, a climbing day camp for the curious, adventurous, and outdoor-lovers in your house. At the Treetop Climbing Camp, you will get an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at what is involved in adventure climbing, including one-on-one training from their skilled park guides. Two sessions are now available, with session one from June 19th to 21st and session two from June 26th to 28th. The camp is best suited for kids ages 10 to 15, but more importantly, campers need to be able to reach six feet with their arms straight up.


The Grand Rapids Ballet has a variety of camps that are all centered around dance. Their Ballet School has programs for ballet, young dancers, boys ballet, and summer intensive training. They also have two Adaptive Dance programs, Explorer Dance (for children with Down syndrome) and Dancing with Parkinson’s (for adults with Parkinson’s disease). These Adaptive Dance classes allow students to experience the joy of dancing who may otherwise not have the opportunity to do so. Summer camps at the Grand Rapids Ballet are both fun and accessible for everyone.


The Grand Rapids Civic Theatre has summer camps that give students the chance to spend an entire week learning about theatre while having a blast making new friends. There are some fantastic additions to the extremely popular summer camp program this year, so you’ll want to take a look at their new offerings for the season. Camps range from age 4 all the way through high school.


Summer fun happens at the Grand Rapids Public Museum. Join in and explore the wonders of science, history, culture, art and fun. For nine weeks this summer, kids ages 4 to 14 can use the museum as a learning lab, experimenting and growing, all while having a great time in one of the area’s most history-rich and “cool” environments.

 

Water polo scheduled for WKTV’s featured high school coverage

Girls water polo is on tap for WKTV featured coverage this week.

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

The WKTV truck and the crews will continue to bring various events to the airwaves this spring and this week we will be at East Kentwood covering girls water polo — twice!

 

The tentative April schedule for WKTV coverage concludes with:

Tuesday, April 25 Water polo, Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

Thursday, April 27 Water Polo West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on later in the week — the Tuesday games will be rebroadcast Wednesdays at 5 p.m., and the Wednesday and Thursday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

The complete list of local high school sports events this week due to spring break is as follows:

 

Monday, April 24

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Middleville T-K – OK Gold Jamboree @ Yankee Springs

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K – OK Gold Jamboree @ Yankee Springs

Wellsprings Prep @ Kelloggsville

East Kentwood @ Rockford

Girls Tennis

Christian @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Comstock Park

Wyoming @ FH Eastern

East Kentwood @ Rockford

Girls Softball

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville – DH

Godwin Heights @ Western Michigan Christian – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Belding – DH

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville

West Michigan Aviation @ Holland Calvary – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Belding

Boys Lacrosse

South Christian @ Catholic Central

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ East Grand Rapids

Godwin Heights @ Kelloggsville

Wayland @ Wyoming

South Haven @ West Michigan Aviation

Crossroads Charter @ Zion Christian

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

 

Tuesday, April 25

Girls Softball

South Christian @ Wayland – DH

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming – DH

East Kentwood @ Rockford – DH

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ Wayland – DH

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ Heritage Christian – DH

Grand River Prep @ Potter’s House – DH

Holland Black River @ Zion Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Rockford – DH

Boys/Girls Track 

NorthPointe Christian @ Kelloggsville

Belding @ Godwin Heights

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Girls Soccer

Fruitport Calvary @ Tri-Unity Christian

Holland Black River @ Zion Christian

East Kentwood @ Rockford

Girls Water Polo

Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

 

Wednesday, April 26

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Wayland – OK Gold Jamboree @ Orchard Hills

Wyoming @ Wayland – OK Gold Jamboree @ Orchard Hills

Kelloggsville @ Hastings

East Kentwood @ West Ottawa – OK Red Jamboree

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ East Grand Rapids

NorthPointe Christian @ Kelloggsville

Wayland @ Wyoming

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Boys/Girls Track 

South Christian @ East Grand Rapids

Christian @ Wyoming

Boys Lacrosse

Kenowa Hills @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

Middleville T-K @ South Christian

NorthPointe Christian @ Kelloggsville

Belding @ Godwin Heights

Wyoming Lee @ Potter’s House

Boys Baseball 

Godwin Heights @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming @ Zeeland East

Hopkins @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Softball 

Godwin Heights @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming @ Zeeland East

East Kentwood @ Jenison

Hopkins @ Wyoing Lee

 

Thursday, April 27

Boys Baseball

Wayland @ South Christian

Wyoming @ East Grand Rapids

West Michigan Aviation @ Kalamazoo Heritage – DH

Rockford @ East Kentwood

Boys/Girls Track

Kelloggsville @ Belding

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

East Kentwood @ Grand Haven

Hopkins @ Wyoming Lee

Boys Golf 

Wyoming @ Zeeland West

Girls Soccer

Hudsonville Hornets @ Wyoming

East Kentwood @ Grandville

Girls Water Polo

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

 

Friday, April 28

Boys Golf

South Christian @ TC Central – TCC Tee Off Invite

Kelloggsville @ Hopkins – OK Silver Jamboree

East Kentwood @ Jackson

Boys Lacrosse

St. Francis @ South Christian

Girls Tennis 

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming

Boys Baseball 

Tri-Unity Christian @ Kelloggsville

Potter’s House @ Godwin Heights – DH

Allendale @ Wyoming – DH

West Michigan Aviation @ Belding – DH

Girls Softball 

East Grand Rapids @ Kelloggsville – DH

Allendale @ Wyoming – DH

Grandville @ East Kentwood – DH

Boys/Girls Track

Potter’s House @ Loy Norrix

Girls Soccer

Zion Christian @ NorthPointe Christian

East Kentwood @ Portage Central

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville/Zeeland Tournament

 

Saturday, April 29

Boys Golf

South Christian @ TC Central – TCC Tee Off Invite

Boys/Girls Track

South Christian @ Wyoming – Frank Grimm Relays

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming – Frank Grimm Relays

Potter’s House @ Wyoming – Frank Grimm Relays

Godwin Heights @ Grand Rapids Public – Elite Challenge

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ Muskegon Mona Shores

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ Hudsonville – Hudsonville Invite

Godwin Heights @ Zion Christian – DH

Holland Calvary @ Tri-Unity Christian – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Ravenna

Girls Softball 

Godwin Heights @ Otsego

Girls Soccer

Tri-Unity Christian @ West Michigan Aviation

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville/Zeeland Tournament

School News Network: Settling conflict by settling minds with connective art

Student-made mandala supports Restorative Justice

By Erin Albanese School News Network

 

With colorful petals radiating from a bright orange center, the mandala Circle of Art rug represents the universe and all its connectivity.

 

For members of Wyoming High School’s National Art Honor Society, it’s also a way of connecting with a program right in their school that helps reduce conflict and unite people.

 

Sinai Salvador, Cecilia Medina and Bekah Luce created the mandala Circle of Art to symbolize restorative justice

NAHS members and juniors Sinai Salvador, Cecilia Medina and Bekah Luce created the rug at the request of Marilyn Booker, who facilitates restorative justice circles at the high school. Booker wanted a symbol that complemented her practice, and students came up with the design. They showcased the rug at the district’s recent Fine Arts Festival.

 

Restorative justice, an outreach of the Grand Rapids-based nonprofit Dispute Resolution Center of West Michigan that started at the high school last school year, is a non-punitive, conflict-resolution program that helps students solve differences using trained mediators.

 

Connecting, Uniting, Restoring

In restorative circles, students who are having conflicts tell each other through guided conversation with Booker what’s on their minds. They hold something, like a squishy ball, to indicate their turn to speak. The goal is to reduce suspensions and address harmful behaviors in a therapeutic way. It has been successful and was expanded to the junior high this school year.

 

Booker lays the rug on the floor in the middle of the circles to give students a focal point if they aren’t quite ready to meet eye-to-eye.

 

“We made the rug to help relieve anxiety with these groups,” said Bekah. “A lot of times the kids don’t feel comfortable and don’t know where to look.”

 

The circle is a universal and eternal symbol seen in many aspects of life: the sun, the moon, the earth and the universe. Conflict is also a universal and eternal issue in society, Booker said: “In a circle, there is no disconnect. We are all connected in some way, shape, or form. … Part of doing circles is every voice is important.

 

“We are restoring kids instead of pushing them out,” she said.

 

Wyoming is a very diverse district, the fourth most diverse in the state, according to the website, Niche. In that context, Sinai explained the depth she sees in the piece.

 

“You can think of all the colors we connected in the mandala rug as all the races that are connected in our school society,” Sinai said. “That’s why it’s used in the restorative program. It gets everyone together.”

 

She sees the school’s diversity as a plus for understanding, noting “we all get along. It doesn’t matter where you come from, we all understand that we have different customs, but we all come together because we are all equal.

 

Restorative justice facilitator Marilyn Booker (far left) hosts a Restorative Circle, with the mandala rug in the center, with, from left, students Kiara Kornoelje, Ashley Elliott, Makenna Vanderstolp and Shay Sees

“It’s a way for the school environment to flourish. That’s also why we picked the flower.”

 

Art and Its Many Connections

Wyoming High’s National Art Honor Society, which includes 21 students, focuses on creating art that connects with the greater community, school community and with themselves, said adviser and art teacher Robin Gransow-Higley.

 

In 1978, the National Art Education Association began the NAHS program to inspire and recognize students who have shown an outstanding ability and interest in art, though it’s open to all students.

 

Wyoming NAHS students organized the district’s recent Fine Arts Festival, which included works from those in grades K-12, plus choir and theater performances, demonstrations by various clubs, face-painting and other activities. Students are also creating a mural representing student athletics and activities.

 

The club aims to encircle the community it its own way, through art, Higley said.

 

“They connect with the greater community, school community and with themselves,” she said.

World Affairs Council offers ‘Peace’ talks at KDL’s Cascade branch

The April 19, discussion, “The New Peacebuilding: Challenges and Opportunities”, will be led by Dr. George Lopez, Hesburgh.

WKTV Contributor

 

The World Affairs Council of Western Michigan and the Kent District Library is holding a series of discussions titled “Give Peace a Chance” at the KDL Cascade Township Branch with the second of three discussions being Wednesday, April 19.

 

The Cascade library is located at 2870 Jack Smith Ave SE, Grand Rapids. The lectures, scheduled from 6:30-7:30 p.m. each day, are free, open to the public and free parking is provided.

 

The April 19, discussion, “The New Peacebuilding: Challenges and Opportunities”, will be led by Dr. George Lopez, Hesburgh Professor of Peace Studies, Emeritus, Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame. Description: “Many pundits and professional politicians suggest that our era of global violence, and especially terrorism, makes peace a fantasy.  This presentation will challenge that claim and will illustrate the new pathways to building peace, particularly on ways in which individual citizens and larger civil society groups can play important roles in building peace in their local communities and especially in outreach to the wider world.”

 

The Thursday, April 27, discussion, “Perspectives on Peace in the New Administration”, will be led by Dr. Frederic Pearson, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, Wayne State University. Description: “With the presidential elections so recent, it is unclear what direction the new administration will take. Dr. Pearson will outline President Trump’s first 100 days in office. Given the trends in his presidential policy thus far, he’ll assess what that means for the prospects of peace worldwide.”

 

For more information visit worldmichigan.org/peace-series .

Baseball, softball scheduled for WKTV’s featured high school coverage

Softball action from Godwin Heights High School will be one of the featured games on WKTV this week.

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

The WKTV truck and the crews will continue to bring various events to the airwaves this spring and this week we will be at South Christian for a baseball game and at Godwin Heights for a softball — and check out next week’s schedule of water polo coverage!

 

The tentative April schedule for WKTV coverage is:

Tuesday, April 18 Baseball, Wyoming @ South Christian

Thursday, April 20 Softball Union @ Godwin Heights

Tuesday, April 25 Water polo, Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

Thursday, April 27 Water Polo West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on later in the week — the Tuesday games will be rebroadcast Wednesdays at 5 p.m., and the Wednesday and Thursday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

The complete list of local high school sports events this week due to spring break is as follows:

 

Monday, April 17

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

East Kentwood @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

Girls Tennis

Wyoming @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

East Kentwood @ Byron Center

Boys Lacrosse

Comstock Park @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ Wayland

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee

Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

Boys Baseball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

West Michigan Aviation @ Tri-Unity Christian – DH

Potter’s House @ Kelloggsville – DH

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Softball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee – DH

 

Tuesday April 18

Boys Baseball

Wyoming @ South Christian – DH

Holland Black River @ Potter’s House – DH

Zion Christian @ Saranac – DH

East Kentwood @ West Ottawa – DH

West Michigan Lutheran @ Three Oaks River Valley

Girls Softball

Wyoming @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ West Ottawa – DH

Girls Soccer 

Godwin Heights @ Potter’s House

Wellsprings Prep @ Tri-Unity Christian

Union @ West Michigan Aviation

Zion Christian @ Calvary Christian

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Boys Golf

East Kentwood @ Grand Haven – OK Red Jamboree

Boys/Girls Track

East Kentwood @ Grandville

Wyoming Lee @ Belding

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville

 

Wednesday April 19

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Christian – OK Gold Jamboree @ Quail Ridge

Wyoming @ Christian – OK Gold Jamboree @ Quail Ridge

Girls Tennis

Wayland @ South Christian

West Catholic @ Kelloggsville

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Boys/Girls Track

South Christian @ FH Eastern

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K

Girls Soccer

Christian @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

FH Eastern @ Wyoming

Wyoming Lee @ Belding

Boys Baseball 

Belding @ Kelloggsville

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

West Michigan Aviation @ Hopkins

Wyoming Lee @ Calvin Christian

Girls Softball 

Belding @ Kelloggsville

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

Wyoming Lee @ Calvin Christian

 

Thursday April 20

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Unity Christian

Kelloggsville @ Delton-Kellogg – Delton-Kellogg Invitational

Wyoming @ Holland

East Kentwood @ Caledonia – OK Red Jamboree

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ Wyoming

Wellsprings Prep @ Tri-Unity Christian – DH

Barry County Christian @ Zion Christian

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Girls Softball

Unity Christian @ South Christian – DH

Union @ Godwin Heights – DH

Wyoming @ Byron Center

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Boys/Girls Track 

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights

Caledonia @ East Kentwood

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Soccer

Tri-Unity Christian @ Zion Christian

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville

Girls Tennis

Kenowa Hills @ East Kentwood

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Zeeland East

 

Friday April 21

Girls Softball

Byron Center @ South Christian – DH

Hastings @ Kelloggsville – DH

Ottawa Hills @ Godwin Heights

Boys Baseball

Byron Center @ South Christian – DH

Potter’s House @ Kelloggsville – DH

West Michigan Aviation @ Godwin Heights – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ NorthPointe Christian

Boys Lacrosse

Jenison @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ Caledonia

Hudsonville Hornets @ Godwin Heights

Allendale @ Wyoming

Potter’s House @ Delton Kellogg

Middleville T-K @ East Kentwood

Kent City @ Wyoming Lee

Boys/Girls Track 

Wyoming @ Hastings

Girls Tennis 

Northview @ Wyoming

Girls Water Polo

@ East Kentwood – EK Invite

 

Saturday April 22

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ AA Greenhills – Gryphon Invite

Hastings @ Kelloggsville – Rocket Invitational

Wyoming @ Hamilton

East Kentwood @ Holt

@ Wyoming Lee – Soils Invitational

Boys/Girls Track 

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee – Lee Invite

West Michigan Aviation @ Wyoming Lee – Lee Invite

Boys Baseball 

Godwin Heights @ Wyoming Lee – Rebel Invitational

Heritage Christian @ Zion Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Catholic Central

Girls Softball 

Wyoming @ Muskegon Reeths-Puffer

East Kentwood @ Muskegon Mona Shores – DH

@ Wyoming Lee – Rebel Invitational

Girls Water Polo

@ East Kentwood – EK Invite

 

Monday April 24

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Middleville T-K – OK Gold Jamboree @ Yankee Springs

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K – OK Gold Jamboree @ Yankee Springs

Wellsprings Prep @ Kelloggsville

East Kentwood @ Rockford

Girls Tennis

Christian @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Comstock Park

Wyoming @ FH Eastern

East Kentwood @ Rockford

Girls Softball

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville – DH

Godwin Heights @ Western Michigan Christian – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Belding – DH

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville

West Michigan Aviation @ Holland Calvary – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Belding

Boys Lacrosse

South Christian @ Catholic Central

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ East Grand Rapids

Godwin Heights @ Kelloggsville

Wayland @ Wyoming

South Haven @ West Michigan Aviation

Crossroads Charter @ Zion Christian

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

 

Go Saints: WKTV to air Ellington Academy basketball special 

WKTV Contributor

 

Ellington Academy of Arts and Technology not only had a great boys basketball season, finishing with a 12-6 record and making it to the Class D District 111 finals, but they also had students at the school produce a video record of the season.

 

WKTV will air the Ellington Academy Saints Basketball Special on Monday, April 17, at 4 p.m.; and Friday, April 21 at 5 p.m., on WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

Ellington Academy of Arts and Technology has been in existence for only seven years and their boys varsity basketball team has been playing for even less. But for the last two years they’ve made it to the District 111 finals for Class D.

 

They have yet to win a district final but Coach Ardrace Morris will tell you that’s fine — for now.

 

The real goal of the mens basketball team is to prepare young men to compete in the real world. Lessons learned on the court and in practice are lessons that stay with you for life. This year, the team learned to face adversity. Watch and see what they’ve learned from dealing with resistance. With only two seniors graduating this year, the team looks poised to finally win a district final for the 2017-18 season.

 

Local high school sports schedule: April 10-17

High school baseball and softball seasons are in full swing. Check out a ball game. (WKTV)

By Mike Moll

sports@wktv.org

 

Spring weather, and spring high school, sports are now in full swing —  “Play Ball! So, if you are looking for a Wyoming and Kentwood area high school varsity sports event to get out to, here is your weekly list.

 

Monday, April 10

Boys baseball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights

Girls softball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights – DH

 

Tuesday, April 11

Girls Tennis 

Cookie Invite @ South Christian

Jenison @ Wyoming

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ FH Eastern – DH

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ Potter’s House – DH

West Michigan Aviation @ Bloomingdale – DH

Grand River Prep @ Zion Christian

Grandville @ East Kentwood – DH

Girls Softball

South Christian @ FH Eastern – DH

Coopersville @ Godwin Heights

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming – DH

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ FH Eastern

Kelloggsville @ Tri-Unity Christian

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming

Hope Academy @ West Michigan Aviation

Potter’s House @ Zion Christian

Caledonia @ East Kentwood

Boys Golf 

Kelloggsville @ Hastings – Scrimmage

Boys/Girls Track 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

West Michigan Aviation @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Water Polo

Portage Central @ East Kentwood

 

Wednesday, April 12

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Calvin Christian

East Kentwood @ Grandville – OK Red Jamboree

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ FH Eastern

Union @ Kelloggsville

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming

Boys/Girls Track

South Christian @ Christian

Boys Lacrosse

South Christian @ Zeeland

Boys Baseball 

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

Godwin Heights @ Belding

FH Central @ Wyoming

Girls Softball 

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

Godwin Heights @ Belding

FH Central @ Wyoming – DH

Girls Soccer 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Water Polo

Grandville @ East Kentwood

 

Thursday, April 13

Boys Golf

South Christian – Kent County Classic @ Thornapple Pointe

East Kentwood – Kent County Classic @ Thornapple Pointe

Boys Baseball  

FH Eastern @ South Christian

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K

Covenant Christian @ Tri-Unity Christian

Grand Rapids Crusaders @ Zion Christian

East Kentwood @ Grandville

Holland Calvary @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls Softball

Caledonia @ South Christian – DH

Wyoming @ Grandville

Unity Christian @ East Kentwood

Boys Lacrosse

Muskegon Reeths-Puffer @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

Wyoming @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Union

Potter’s House @ Tri-Unity Christian

Grand River Prep @ Zion Christian

Boys/Girls Track 

Wyoming Lee @ Kelloggsville

Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

Rockford @ East Kentwood

Girls Tennis

@ East Kentwood – EK Quad

 

Friday, April 14

Boys Golf 

Wyoming @ Kelloggsville

Girls Softball 

Western Michigan Christian @ Kelloggsville

Girls Soccer 

West Ottawa @ Wyoming

West Michigan Aviation @ Wyoming Lee

Northview @ East Kentwood

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Jenison

 

Saturday, April 15

Boys/Girls Track

South Christian @ Unity Christian

Kelloggsville @ Coopersville – Bronco Classic

Wyoming @ Comstock Park

West Michigan Aviation @ Lakewood – Lakewood Invitational

East Kentwood @ Mansfield/Mehock Relays

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ East Kentwood – EK Invite

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming – Wyoming Tournament

Godwin Heights @ Wyoming – Wyoming Tournament-

Wyoming Lee @ Union – DH

Girls Softball

South Christian @ East Kentwood – EK Invite

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ East Kentwood

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming – Wyoming Invitational

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Jenison

 

Sunday, April 16

EASTER SUNDAY

 

Monday, April 17

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

East Kentwood @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

Girls Tennis

Wyoming @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

East Kentwood @ Byron Center

Boys Lacrosse

Comstock Park @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ Wayland

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee

Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

Boys Baseball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

West Michigan Aviation @ Tri-Unity Christian – DH

Potter’s House @ Kelloggsville – DH

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Softball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee – DH

 

After exciting winter of high school sports, WKTV’s spring coverage starts

High School girls water polo is on the schedule for WKTV coverage this spring.

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

The winter schedules wrapped up in March with a couple of our local teams showing very well in the state tournament. In the boys Class D tournament, Tri-Unity Christian made it to the state quarterfinals before falling to eventual state runner-up Buckley by 11 points. The girls side had the East Kentwood Lady Falcons getting into the championship game in Class A before losing for just the second time all season, to Flushing, also by 11.

 

The WKTV truck and the crews will continue to bring various events to the airwaves this spring and including, for the first time, in addition to baseball and softball, we will be covering girls water polo.

 

The tentative April schedule for WKTV coverage is:

Tuesday, April 11: Baseball, Grandville @ East Kentwood

Wednesday, April 12: Water polo, Grandville @ East Kentwood

Tuesday, April 18: Baseball, Wyoming @ South Christian

Thursday, April 20: Softball Union @ Godwin Heights

Tuesday, April 25: Water polo, Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

Thursday, April 27: Water Polo West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on later in the week — the Tuesday games will be rebroadcast Wednesdays at 5 p.m., and the Wednesday and Thursday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

Local high school sports events are limited this week due to spring break. They are as follows:

 

Saturday, April 8

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park

 

Monday, April 10

Boys baseball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights

Girls softball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights – DH

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

Creating a community that cares

 

By ACSET Community Action Agency

 

Each year, ACSET Community Action holds it Walk for Warmth to raise funds for emergency heating assistance for low-income families in Kent County. And each year, students at Sibley Elementary participate in activities to support the walk and help their neighbors in need.

 

For more than 10 years, second graders engaged in the social studies unit Learning About Communities, have worked together to make positive changes in their community. The students, known as the “Sibley Warmth Force,” write letters to local businesses to ask for donations for the annual Walk for Warmth.

 

“Our studies focus on citizenship and building community,” explained Bernice Wisnieski, a second grade teacher at Sibley. “This service project is an awesome way to bring the lesson to life.”

 

This year the second grade students wanted a way to get the entire school involved. They worked with the principal and scheduled the first Sibley Walk-a-thon for Warmth. Along with the Walk for Warmth on February 11th, all students at Sibley Elementary took turns walking on March 14, holding signs with the names of businesses that helped support the cause. Many of the older students remembered this project from past years and were excited to participate again.

 

In addition to the walk-a-thon, the students made and sold fleece blankets and brought in pennies for a total of almost $2,000 in donations. ACSET Community Action is grateful to the students for their hard work and warm hearts; to the businesses for their generous donations; and to the Sibley teachers for creating a community that cares for those less fortunate.

 

Your Community in Action! is provided by ASCET Community Action Agency. To learn more about how they help meet emergency needs and assist with areas of self-sufficiency, visit www.communityactionkent.org

Meijer Gardens expansion includes expanded learning center, local community education opportunities

Architectural drawings for Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park’s new Covenant Learning Center, which will be topped by the new Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

The multi-phased building expansion plans of the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park announced last week will include an expansion the institution’s learning center, already a favorite of several Wyoming and Kentwood community organizations including Kentwood Public Schools A.R.C.H. after school program.

 

The expansion plans include a new 60,000 square foot welcome center, a new transportation center, expansion and upgrades to the concert amphitheater, a new sculpture garden entry plaza and a “reimagined” scenic indoor corridor, and expanded parking and urban garden areas. Overall, project construction is scheduled to begin this fall and continue for approximately four years.

 

After the new welcome center, however, and most important expansion may be the 20,000 square foot Covenant Learning Center, which will be topped by the new Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.

 

Architectural drawings for Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park’s new Covenant Learning Center, which will be topped by the new Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.

“Today we have two approximately 1,100 square foot classrooms devoted to education,” Meijer Gardens President and CEO David Hooker said when asked by WKTV about the Covenant Learning Center. “Since 1999, our educational programming has grown 305 percent. While our education programming has grown … our space dedicated to education has remained the same. The new Covenant Learning Center will have four approximately 1,200 square foot classrooms, two 1,600 square foot classrooms and one 2,200 square foot Interactive Education Area. The opportunity for additional educational programming is nearly unlimited.”

 

Wyoming and Kentwood programs at the gardens

 

Kentwood’s A.R.C.H. after school program is just one of the many programs currently using the Garden’s educational programing.

 

“The after-school programs from both Kentwood (A.R.C.H.) and Wyoming (T.E.A.M. 21), in particular, have made frequent visits to Meijer Gardens in the past,” said Jessica Hart, Meijer Gardens indoor education manager. “We’re delighted that these groups have been able to enjoy our seasonal exhibitions, Sculpture Park, and Children’s Garden. I expect that the new Covenant Learning Center will allow us additional opportunities to offer educational programs school groups and after-school groups alike in the future.”

 

A.R.C.H. is a collaboration between Kentwood Public Schools and the Kentwood Parks and Recreation Department. Program activities focus on academics, health, wellness, and recreation/leisure education.  These activities will be offered to children, family, and community members throughout the year.

 

But the Kentwood program is just one of many groups availing themselves of local cultural educational opportunities. And that is just the way Meijer Garden’s wants it.

 

Following recent educational additions to other Grand Rapids area institutions, including The Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum, Meijer Garden’s Covenant Learning Center “will engage learners in new ways and reinforce our commitment as the go-to place for cultural education,” according to supplied information.

 

Part of Meijer Garden’s mission

 

“Since our beginning, education has been a hallmark of the Meijer Gardens mission — reaching more than 89,000 guests last year alone. In fact, the action word in our mission statement is ‘promote.’ Education is the primary method by which we put life into the word ‘promote.’ The dramatic growth of participation in our educational programming not only underscores the quality and diversity of our classes, camps and events, but also demonstrates a need for more classroom space.”

 

A key aspect of the new classrooms will be that they will provide outdoor learning areas, with five of the six having direct access from within the classroom. The outdoor learning area will be located east of the building and will include seating areas for students, teaching areas for instructors, and partial shade/cover from the elements.

 

The expansion plans are the result of a nearly complete $115 million capital campaign titled “Welcoming the World: Honoring a Legacy of Love”. The campaign currently has raised about $102 million of its goal, according to supplied information.

 

“If we are successful in our ‘Welcoming the World: Honoring a Legacy of Love’ fundraising efforts, we will begin construction in September of this year,” Hooker said. “We do not have a precise date at this time for the completion of the Covenant Learning Center or the Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.”

 

The New York firm Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects Partners has been chosen “to re-envision and expand” the Meijer Gardens facilities, according to supplied information. The firm is known for their design of the iconic Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia and, most recently, chosen to design the Barack Obama Presidential Center in Chicago.

 

For more information about Meijer Gardens visit meijergardens.org. For more information about the “Welcoming the World: Honoring a Legacy of Love” fundraising efforts visit meijergardens.org/legacyoflove .

 

Employment Expertise: Ace the phone interview!

 

By West Michigan Works!

 

Employers offer short phone interviews now more than ever before. These interviews help hiring managers decide which candidates to invite to a longer, in-person interview.

 

More than half of what a person says is communicated through body language and non-verbal cues. During a phone interview, the hiring manager can only hear your words. So, extra prep is required.

 

Here are some ways to help make sure you’re offered a second interview:

 

Pick the right place
Find a quiet room for your interview. Arrange for a babysitter. Put your dog where you can’t hear the bark.

 

Put your questions on a table and have a pen ready to take notes. Use these notes to help personalize your thank you note, or to write down questions to ask at the end of the interview.

 

Don’t forget to charge your cell phone the night before. And make sure the room gets good service. Keep your phone connected to your phone charger, if needed.

 

Your introduction is important
Answer their call professionally and identify yourself: “Hi, this is _________.”

 

Smile
Even though the interviewer can’t see you, a smile will change the tone of your voice. It adds energy to your words and helps you sound friendly.

 

Keep answers short and direct
Answer questions in three sentences or less. Short answers don’t allow the employer to get distracted on the phone and hear what you’re saying.

 

Don’t forget to thank them after the interview is over, and send a note in the mail.

 

Employment Expertise is provided by West Michigan Works! Learn more about how they can help: visit westmiworks.org or your local Service Center.

School News Network: Kelloggsville students urged to ‘Find What You Love’

City of Kentwood Mayo rStephen Kepley talks about his engineering background led him into city services. (Photo courtesy of School News Network.)

By Erin Albanese

School News Network

 

If someone had told Greggory Hampshire how clinical psychologists spend their days (with lots of paperwork), he might not have pursued it as a career. That’s one reason he likes bringing community professionals into classrooms and giving students real exposure to real careers.

 

“I want you to get an idea of what exists out there, of what you want to do with your life,” said Hampshire, director of education for Junior Achievement of the Michigan Great Lakes.

 

Middle school students got a glimpse of different careers during Reverse Job Shadow Day, when entrepreneurs and professionals stopped by to share their journeys in pursuing their dreams.

 

Professional boxer and entrepreneur Parnell Gates shows his belt to sixth-grader Quijuan Madion-Lewis. (Photo courtesy of School News Network.)

Eighteen speakers — six per grade level — visited sixth- through eighth-graders for the event. It was made possible through a partnership with JA, which teaches young people about work-readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy skills.

 

The goal was to get students thinking about career fields they may not have considered, said school counselor Laura Kuperus. Professions included manufacturing, health care, law enforcement, finance, cosmetology and education. Several visitors, including a professional boxer, were small business owners and some had pursued skilled trades instead of college.

 

Speakers described ups and downs they had faced through school and in their careers. “That’s inspiring for our kids,” Kuperus said. Karyn Hocking, owner of Salus Massage in Grandville, told eighth-graders that she struggled in school because of a learning disability.

“If you struggle in an area, no matter what subject that may be, that doesn’t mean anything,” Hocking said. “You can still get out and do what you want to do.”

 

Josephine White, owner of JoJo’s House of Business in Grand Rapids, said running a business is hard work, but passion makes it worth it. “Find what you love,” she urged students. “If you find what you love, it’s not that hard.”

 

Seventh-graders Samatha Benitez and Camiyah Blackman try to figure out how to balance six nails atop one nailhead, a challenge from Mayor Stephen Kepley.

A World of Options Awaits

Middle school is a great time to start exploring careers, Kuperus said.

 

“It’s so important for our students to see the variety of careers available to them. Often they think of traditional things they’ve heard of, but they become aware that there are careers they haven’t thought of before.”

 

City of Kentwood Mayor Stephen Kepley was an engineer for the city for 11 years before being elected mayor in 2013. He said he loves meeting the city’s young people.

 

“My favorite part of the job is investing in the next generation,” Kepley said. “I love networking and solving problems.”

 

Regardless of career choice, people need to know how to work well with others, he said. He illustrated that by challenging students to work in groups to balance six nails on one upright nailhead. “How you solve problems is going to be a big key in how successful you are.”

 

Students said they enjoyed peeking into the lives of business owners.
“It shows you that there are a bunch of different opportunities to choose from,” said eighth-grader Brooklyn Kelly.

 

Check out School News Network for more stories about students, schools, and faculty in West Michigan.

Poverty simulation at Metro Health asks, “What could we do differently?”

Health professionals gather in “families” in preparation to experience a “month” in poverty. Photo by Ellie Walburg

By Ellie Walburg, Access of West Michigan

 

Reading a news article about someone living in poverty is one thing.

 

Actually experiencing it is another.

 

Metro Health Hospital Services recently hosted a poverty simulation workshop with Access of West Michigan. The goal of the poverty education program is to create awareness of the realities of poverty and bring inspiration for change in an experiential way.

 

Participants in the ‘Living on the Edge’ poverty simulation at Metro Health were assigned profiles detailing their name, age, family, income level and other related details. Each “family” then completed four weeks, made up of 15-minute increments, in providing groceries, paying bills, attending doctor’s appointments and other requirements as outlined on their profiles.

 

Afterwards, participants engaged in small group discussions to debrief and learn from one another’s insights.

 

Linda Bos is a registered nurse with Metro Health and attended the workshop. She, along with Heather Rayman, were given the roles of a 75- and 72-year-old couple struggling to make ends meet. Bos, playing the role of Anthony Xanthos, and Rayman playing his wife, Zelda, spent each “week” trying to keep up on their mortgage payments, provide $50 for food and make it to expensive doctor appointments.

 

At one point during the four weeks, they couldn’t buy groceries. Towards the end of the month, they were evicted from their home as they couldn’t provide proof of their mortgage payment.

 

Mobility was also a major issue for them.

 

‘We were struck that we were always concerned about traveling places,” Bos said. “We were never together — it split us up. We never did things together.”

 

Conversations about how they were doing or if they wanted to plan a vacation never arose during their time of balancing their meager budget and keep all their bills afloat “We sure didn’t talk about anything fun,” Bos added.

 

To accompany the small social assistance check they received for the month, Bos sought out other options.

 

“I also tried to get a job, but there was age discrimination,” she said. “There were forms to fill out that were difficult.”

 

Access of West Michigan Staffers share their own story of poverty during group discussions. Photo by Ellie Walburg

Not having an opportunity for additional income made balancing finances even more troublesome.

 

“There was no way out for us,” Bos said. “Neither one of us could get a job.”

 

Rayman was reminded, “Don’t forget we have to eat at some point in our life,” as she recalled the struggle of purchasing weekly groceries.

 

For both Bos and Rayman, living life as an elderly couple with little money was an eye-opening experience.

 

“Everything was tension-producing rather than pleasurable,” Bos noted.

 

That tension is something Bos knows first-hand. While currently employed and doing well, she has felt that same stress.

 

“There was a time when I didn’t have money to buy diapers, when we didn’t have money to pay the mortgage,” she said

 

Bos and Rayman agreed that this simulation could change the way they work with their patients and others they encounter.

 

“I think for me, I’ll be much more cognizant of transportation needs,” Bos said. “I’ll think, ‘What can I do to relieve some of those transportation issues.’”

 

Bos’s work as a nurse involves serving moms and newborns.

 

“I try to be very intentional with younger moms,” she said. “I’ll ask, ‘Do you need anything else for your child?’ ‘Do you have diapers?’ ‘Do you have formula?’”

 

She said she anticipates building upon that intention with those she sees.

 

“I think so often we don’t want to offend people,” she added. “But it’s really just about asking, ‘I want to help, what is it that you need?’” That intention, she said, can come through her following up with her clients through phone calls or other additional conversations.

 

Staffers Candice and Cindy are ready at their “health clinic” table to help participants. Photo by Ellie Walburg

Rayman added, “I feel like this makes me much more aware of things like transportation, medication, samples, getting them to a care manager or something like that — things I didn’t really think of before.”

 

As the simulation event drew to a close, attendees were reminded that while they stopped playing a role in a fictitious family, there are so many in the community who must continue with that difficult reality everyday. And now that the participants had experienced the frustration and stress of living in poverty, they, and all, are left with the question Bos wondered, “What might you do differently?”

 

To learn more about poverty education and the Living On The Edge poverty simulation workshops, please visit http://accessofwestmichigan.org/about-us/poverty-education/.

Local high school sports schedule: March 13-18

This week’s local high school sports available includes the East Kentwood girls basketball team in the state tournament.

Looking for a Wyoming and Kentwood area high school varsity sports event to get out to? Here is your weekly list.

 

Tuesday, March 14

Girls basketball

East Kentwood vs. Kalamazoo Central @ MHSAA Class A state quarterfinals @ Lansing Eastern High School @ 7 p.m.

 

Wednesday, March 15

Boys basketball

Wyoming Tri-unity Christian vs. Baldwin @ MHSAA Class D regional finals @ Big Rapids-Crossroads Charter Academy @ 7 p.m.

 

Friday, March 17

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ East Grand Rapids

Girls Basketball

MHSAA Class A state semifinals @ MSU Breslin Center/Lansing (possibly East Kentwood)

 

Saturday, March 18

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ East Grand Rapids

Girls Basketball

MHSAA Class A state finals @ MSU Breslin Center/Lansing (possibly East Kentwood) @ Noon

 

Game on: WKTV’s featured games for March 6-10

The WKTV Mobile Unit will be out covering local high school basketball playoffs this week. (WKTV)

WKTV Staff

 

This week in WKTV’s featured high school sport games will be determined by which local teams are advancing in the basketball tournaments, but the coverage crew will be at  Godwin Heights Monday, March 6, for the boys basketball game between Grand River Prep vs Kelloggsville at Godwin Heights. The late week game will be determined later this week, tentatively on Friday, and will be announced.

 

WKTV videos and broadcasts several games each week during high school sports season.

 

The early week game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood. The late week game will be aired that night on Live Wire 24 at 10:30 p.m. and repeat Saturday at 11 a.m. on WKTV 25 and AT&T U-verse 99.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action in January, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

DVDs and Blue-Rays of each game are also available for purchase at $20 including shipping. For more information, visit WKTV.org

 

Local high school sports schedule: March 6-13

The high school hockey playoffs are in full swing this week.

Looking for a Wyoming and Kentwood area high school varsity sports event to get out to? Here is your weekly list.

 

Monday, March 6

Boys Basketball

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – Grand River Prep vs Kelloggsville

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – Godwin Heights vs South Christian

MHSAA State Districts @ Zeeland East – Wyoming @ Zeeland East

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – TBD

MHSAA State Districts @ Ottawa Hills – TBD

 

Tuesday, March 7

Girls Basketball

MHSAA State Regionals @ Zeeland East – TBD

 

Wednesday, March 8

Boys Basketball

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – TBD vs Wyoming Lee

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – Holland Calvary vs Zion Christian

MHSAA State Districts @ Ottawa Hills – East Kentwood vs Ottawa Hills

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – Tri-Unity Christian vs Potter’s  House

 

Thursday, March 9

Girls Basketball

MHSAA State Regionals @ Zeeland East – TBD

 

Friday, March 10

Girls Gymnastics

MHSAA State Team Finals – @ Plymouth-Canton

Boys Hockey

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 1 @ Plymouth 5:00 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 1 @ Plymouth 7:30 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 2 @ Plymouth 5:00 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 2 @ Plymouth 7:30 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 3 @ Plymouth 11:00 AM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 3 @ Plymouth 1:30 PM

Boys Swimming

MHSAA State Finals – Division 1 @ Oakland University

MHSAA State Finals – Division 2 @ Eastern Michigan University

MHSAA State Finals – Division 3 @ Holland Aquatic Center

Boys Basketball

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – TBD

MHSAA State Districts @ Ottawa Hills – TBD

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – TBD

 

Saturday, March 11

Girls Gymnastics

MHSAA State Individual Finals – @ Plymouth-Canton

Boys Hockey

MHSAA State Finals – Division 1 @ Plymouth – 6:00 PM

MHSAA State Finals – Division 2 @ Plymouth – 10:00 AM

MHSAA State Finals – Division 3 @ Plymouth – 2:00 PM

Boys Swimming

MHSAA State Finals – Division 2 @ Eastern Michigan University

MHSAA State Finals – Division 3 @ Holland Aquatic Center

 

No scheduled local team events March 13-16

School News Network: Godfrey-Lee schedules superintendent interviews

Current Godfrey-Lee Superintendent David Britten will retire on July 1.

By Erin Albanese

School News Network

 

The Board of Education has scheduled special meetings in March to interview superintendent candidates to replace superintendent David Britten, who will retire July 1.

 

Candidates were narrowed from a field of 30 applicants. The following candidates will be interviewed in scheduled open public sessions:

 

  • Tamika Henry, principal at New Options High School in Allendale Public Schools;
  • Carol Lautenbach, assistant superintendent for teaching, learning and accountability for Godfrey-Lee Public Schools;
  • Carlos Lopez, director of curriculum, instruction and assessment in Plymouth-Canton Community Schools;
  • Margaret Malone, director of fine arts for Grand Rapids Public Schools.

 

Lopez and Lautenbach will be interviewed starting at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, March 6; and Henry and Malone starting at 6:30 p.m on Wednesday, March 8, during special board meetings. Both meetings are open to the public.

 

After the initial round of interviews, the board is expected to narrow the field to two for a final round and selection scheduled for 6 p.m. on Monday, March 20. All interviews will be at the Godfrey-Lee Early Childhood Center, 961 Joosten St. SW.

 

Check out School News Network for more stories about students, schools, and faculty in West Michigan.

School News Network: Tuesday Job Fair Seeks Teachers, Support Staff

With a job fair Tuesday, March 7, Kent ISD and EDUStaff seek to increase the substitute teachers and support staff local districts badly need. The job fair takes place from 10am-2pm at Kent ISD’s administration building, 2930 Knapp Street NE, Grand Rapids, 49525.

 

EDUStaff is a Grand Rapids area company formed in 2010 to provide substitute staff for schools and works with many districts across the state. (EDUStaff is also a sponsor of School News Network.)

 

Finding substitute staff is increasingly difficult for schools, according to Kent ISD Superintendent Ron Caniff. “As Michigan’s job market has improved, our districts are having a tough time finding good staff, including subs. And these subs are a critical resource and an important part of the school family. They help students keep learning when staff are out ill, tending to the needs of their own families, or participating in the professional development that improves achievement.”

 

Check out School News Network for more stories about students, schools, and faculty in West Michigan.

 

Registration now open for the Michigan IDA Annual Spring Conference

Technology and Literacy: The Ultimate Chicken and Egg Conundrum

 

By Heidi Turchan, SLD Read


Does your child continue to struggle in class specialized instruction and additional support? Are you overwhelmed with the choices of assistive technology? Have you ever had a bright student with unexpectedly poor reading, spelling and writing skills? Even though you thought your instruction was carefully planned, you somehow couldn’t reach that student.


For the past dozen years, educational technology has been the rage of schools across North America and abroad. It held great promise for students with reading and writing challenges, including dyslexia. However, too often this technology is nothing more than word-processing assignments, spell check, email and web searches — all of which require competent literacy skills to access.


Here’s the conundrum: no student can access these traditional technologies without competent reading, spelling and writing skills. Throughout this presentation, Elaine Cheesman will demonstrate instructional technology that is intuitive, research-based and focused on specific literacy skills. Dr. Cheesman offers solutions that can take students, teachers, tutors and clinicians beyond the conventional technologies to give them the technological keys to literacy success.

Dr. Elaine Chessman

Dr. Cheesman is an associate professor at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Connecticut and credentials as a Certified Academic Language Therapist and Qualified Instructor at Teachers College, Columbia University, under the direction of Judith Birsh. Her primary research, teaching and service interests are teacher-preparation in scientifically based reading instruction and the use of technology in literacy education.


Dr. Cheesman received the Excellence in Teacher Educator Award from the Teacher Education Division of the Colorado Council for Exceptional Children, the Teacher of the Year and the Outstanding Researcher awards from the University of Colorado College Of Education. The reading courses she developed are among the first teacher preparation programs accredited by the International Dyslexia Association.

When: Saturday, April 8, 2017
Where: Washtenaw Community College, 4800 E. Huron River Dr., Ann Arbor, Mich.


Register here.

Running with the Wolves; Wyoming high inducts five into its athletic Hall of Fame

Wyoming High School inducted five student athletes, some from Rogers and some from Wyoming Park high schools, into its athletic Hall of Fame. (WKTV)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

When cross-town athletic rivals Wyoming Park and Rogers high schools combined to form the current Wyoming High School, two athletic traditions were combined and a new one was born.

 

That shared past and unified present was honored early this month as five one-time students athletes were inducted into the Wyoming High School athletic Hall of Fame.

 

The ceremony was held Feb. 10, between home boys and girls basketball games. Those inducted included Andy Vavere, Laura Erdmans Readle, Doug Chappell, Kim Blouw Norden and Eric Taylor.

 

For many of the inductees, it was not only night to be honored but to remember high school athletic careers and experiences still remembered fondly — including one where cross-town athletic competition led to a union of a different kind.

 

Andy Vavere, Rogers High Class of 1980, was not only a standout football, basketball and baseball athlete — highlighted by the basketball team’s deep runs into the state tournament in 1979 and 1980 — but he also met his future wife during his high school years.

 

Andy Vavere (WKTV)

“My favorite (athletic) memories were our tournament runs we had in 1979 and 1980. We were regional finalists in ’79 and semifinalists in ’80,” Vavere said. Rogers was 21-4 the first year and 21-5 the second.

 

During those years, Vavere was an OK Red all-conference baseball player in 1979, an all-conference quarterback in 1980, and a all-conference basketball player in both years. He was also the 1980 Adrian Allen Athlete of the Year Award winner.

 

But the longest lasting memory was meeting his wife, Margaret, who attended his school’s arch rival.

 

“I was a senior at Rogers High School in 1980 and she was at Wyoming Park, a competitive school, and we met through competition,” he said. “I started dating Margaret in 1979 and we got married in 1989.”

 

And, Vavere admitted, it was always a challenge to face Wyoming Park on the field: “Absolutely, those guys were great,” he said.

 

Running into the Hall of Fame

 

One of those “great” Wyoming Park athletes was cross country and track runner Kim Blouw, Class of 1990.

 

Blouw, who later graduated from Central Michigan University, was track all-state each of her four years of high school, and was an all-state cross country runner her junior and senior years. She held school records in the 800, 1,600, 3,200-meter runs as well as in the 2-mile relay run. And she was part of a state champion 2-mile relay team one year.

 

But, maybe, the highlife of her high school career was spring track practice after a 16-hour bus ride to Myrtle Beach, S.C.

 

Kim Blouw Norden (WKTV)

“I guess my favorite memories about high school would be my two coaches, Mr. (Frank) Grimm and Mr. (Dick) Locke, and traveling to South Carolina to go to Myrtle Beach, becoming a team, but not only a team but becoming a family,” Blouw said.

 

She also credits her family, both at home and on the Wyoming Park athletic teams, for keeping her focused and successful in her high school years.

 

“What made me do that was that I had two great parents who instilled a really good value system in us, myself and my brother,” she said. “I had really great coaches that really emphasized the importance of never giving up. I had a goal, and my goal was to go to college. And I was blessed with the ability to run. … So many people believed in me, encouraged me to excel in my career as a track and cross country runner. I embraced that.”

 

Three more honored with induction

 

Eric Taylor, Wyoming Park Class of 1988, had a basketball career that not only brought success to his high school, but to his college and professional teams as a player, and then carried him back nearly to full-circle as a high school basketball coach.

 

Taylor was an all-conference and all-state player his last two years at Wyoming Park, then  played basketball and earned a degree at Oakland University. He went on to play professionally in Europe, winning multiple championships, and earn his masters degree from Grand Valley State University. He now coaches varsity basketball at Grand Rapids Christian High School.

 

“My passion is giving back to students and to influence their lives in a positive way everyday,” Taylor said in supplied material. “It’s about the legacy to reach, teach, love and support all students and be an example and a role everyday for all students.”

 

Doug Chappel, Rogers Class of 1979, died in 2012 but left a mark on the basketball record books both at his high school and at University of Detroit. He was a multi-sport athlete but starred on the basketball court in high school — including being all-conference three years, all state two years including being one of the top five players in the state his senior year, and scoring 1,300 points while grabbing more than 700 rebounds. He then played four years of college ball at Detroit, scoring nearly 1,200 points and gaining all-league honors.

 

Laura Readle, Wyoming Park Class of 1981, was a multi-sport athlete, including all-conference honors multiple years in volleyball, basketball and track. She was a rebounding machine on the basketball court, averaging 29 rebounds a game one year, and a record-braking sprinter on the track. She went on to gain her bachelors and masters degrees from Aquinas College, coached AAU basketball for 10 years and is now the track coach at Tri-County High School.

 

She also still runs, and runs and runs — including finishing marathons, ½ marathons, triathlons and the 25K River Bank run spread out over 30 years, and recently participated in a 5-hour adventure race. And the track for Wyoming Park, at Godwin High School, is still one of her favorite memories.

 

She remembers “when the only track that was ‘rubberized’ not cinder, in the late ’70s, at Godwin High School … every track meet all 8 schools in our conference would be there,” Readle said in supplied material. “I met many wonderful friends from all the other schools in our conference and I am still friends with many of them today. It is also where I met my husband. Many, many happy memories!”

 

School News Network: Students Go Greek by Questioning, Discussing Issues as Socrates did

Evelyn Villarreal-Cervantes expresses her thoughts (Courtesy of School News Network)

By Erin Albanese

School News Network

 

Though the topic was tied to the American Revolution, discussion among Wyoming Intermediate School fifth-graders was inspired by a robed man with a long beard who did his musing more than two millennia ago: Socrates.

 

The young philosophers joined the Socratic Seminar discussion panels – desks pushed together into large rectangles –– for deep thinking about a long-debated question: “Who was responsible for inciting the Boston Massacre?”

 

Taunting colonists, trigger-happy British soldiers, events leading up to the massacre and how it all went down — students talked about such details in teachers Paul Debri and Wendy Kiel’s class. They drew conclusions about who was responsible for the March 5, 1770 event when five colonial residents were shot and killed by British soldiers.

The class discusses The Boston Massacre using the Socratic method (Photo courtesy of School News Network)

“The colonists were fearing the soldiers, so maybe (the soldiers) could fire to start a fight,” said student Emma Parm.

 

“Colonists were kind of guilty because the mobs were taunting and teasing the British soldiers,” chipped in Regan Mead.
Socratic Seminars, used in several Wyoming Intermediate classrooms, employ the Socratic method, a form of dialogue based on asking and answering questions to stimulate critical thinking, and to draw out ideas and underlying presumptions.

 

Socrates, born circa 470 B.C., was known for questioning others, listening to what they had to say and probing for contradictions.

 

“Socrates wasn’t wanting one true answer,” said teacher Debri. “He had open-ended questions that could be debated, discussed and shared. … It was the whole process of questioning, thinking and rationalizing.

 

“This is a great way for students to discuss things in a polite way, ask questions, reason, justify answers,” he added. “It’s a great way for them to express their thoughts in a nice, safe environment.”

 

Quenton Gebben shares his thoughts while Gage Behrenbrinker listens (Photo courtesy of School News Network)

A Method of Questioning and Listening
Socratic Seminars, which work for nearly all subjects, take off with little teacher moderation. Students come prepared with questions, make points and counterpoints, speak only when they are holding a ball, and agree or disagree based on research they’ve done in class.

 

They start statements with, “I agree because …” or “I disagree because …” or I have a question …” and often end with “What do you think?,” prompting more dialogue as they pass the ball to a classmate.

 

Language arts department chair and sixth-grade teacher Jayne Bartrand introduced the seminars to staff members last school year. It requires skills used by “the great brains of time,” she said. Teachers tested it, debating the killing of Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe by an American hunter.

 

“It addresses so many skills we want kids to have,” Bartrand said. “That’s how we should all function in a workplace really. You sit down, here’s an idea and you discuss it.”

Students offer each other checks and balances, pointing out other perspectives and more information. “They really do have to support their line of thinking,” Bartrand said.

 

Debri said students use key vocabulary and make intersections between other historical events during the seminars, taking active control of their learning.

 

Irvin Diaz-Castillo takes his turn talking about the Boston Massacre (Photo courtesy of School News Network)

Thinking Like a Greek
Students said acting like Socrates helps them have an open mind and look at issues and events from different angles. Fifth-graders have also had a seminar on Cecil the Lion. Sixth-graders have discussed stories of courage based on readings; the positives and negatives of being a YouTube star; and what happened to Amelia Earhart.

 

“I’ve learned everybody has an opinion on things and our opinions are not all going to be the same,” said fifth-grader Yeriel Francis. “You are learning more and more from what other people think.”

 

“I like it because there’s one person speaking at a time and there’s many different opinions going around,” added Emma Parm. “It helps me personally with understanding what the whole thing is about and what happened if I’m not clear about it.”

 

Fifth-grader Haley Young said the talks help her learn more than she would in a traditional classroom lesson. She’s also getting more comfortable with public speaking.

 

Gage Behrenbrinker agreed. “Like Haley said, if you just watch a video and read an article you don’t learn much, but if you really talk about it with other people you start to learn more and you want to get more involved.”

Game on: WKTV’s featured games for Feb. 20-25

Hockey at East Kentwood High School is on tap for Saturday coverage by the WKTV crew.

WKTV Staff

 

This week in WKTV’s featured high school sport games, the coverage crew will be at East Kentwood for girls basketball game against Hudsonville on Tuesday, Feb. 21, and then at East Kentwood for a hockey game against Forest Hills Central on Saturday, Feb. 25.

 

WKTV videos and broadcasts several games each week during high school sports season.

 

Each Tuesday game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood. Every Friday game will be aired that night on Live Wire 24 at 10:30 p.m. and repeat Saturday at 11 a.m. on WKTV 25 and AT&T U-verse 99.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action in January, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

DVDs and Blue-Rays of each game are also available for purchase at $20 including shipping. For more information, visit WKTV.org

 

School News Network: Brain Games: Focusing on Memory to Reduce Effect of Poverty

Second-grade teacher Patrick Sokol talks about how memory works with his students. (Photo courtesy of School News Network.)

By Erin Albanese

 

School News Network

 

Kelloggsville Public Schools second-grade teacher Patrick Sokol is working to close gaps in achievement seen in students raised in poverty, and he’s zeroing in on helping students develop “working memory.”

 

In his West Elementary classroom on a Friday morning, Sokol drew a mixing bowl on a whiteboard in front of his students. He asked them to name ingredients needed to make pancakes. They eagerly answered: “eggs,” “baking powder,” “vanilla,” “flour,” “sugar,” as Sokol wrote the list on the bowl.

 

“If we get those all in the bowl, we are going to be able to do something with them. We are going to be able to make pancakes. But what if there are holes in the bowl?”

 

He told students to think of their brains like the bowl: They need to be able to use what they put inside. “If you can’t keep those things in your brain, are you going to be able to do anything with them?”

 

Isaiah Wiseman and Alivia Walber work together on remembering numbers.

Sokol’s mini-lesson was an introduction to activities aimed to improve students’ working memory. That’s the ability to store and manage information in one’s mind for a short period of time, like remembering a list of items or series of number long enough to apply them to what you need.

 

During a game called “If I Went,” students named items they would bring to the beach or camping. On their turns, they recalled items named before them in order. “If I went to the beach I would bring food, an air mattress, marshmallows and…,” said Myana Santiago-DeJesus, remembering the items named by her classmates and adding “shelter” to the list.

 

They also created a string of numbers, adding one at a time, and recalling them with a partner.

 

Students enjoyed the tasks, taking pride in remembering eight, nine, even 10 numbers in a row, and a list of camping items worthy of the Scouts, but Sokol’s purpose is larger than meets the eye. He is hoping to “fill the gap” in memory function caused by the stressors present in many of the lives of students who grow up poor.

 

Sokol’s work is part of an ongoing study by Kelloggsville staff, administrators and Board of Education members of Eric Jensen’s book, “Teaching with Poverty in Mind.” In Kelloggsville, about 78 percent of students are considered economically disadvantaged, qualifying for free or reduced lunch, and research shows students who grow up in poverty struggle with working memory.

 

That could be a factor in the stark correlation between poverty and student achievement. An analysis by School News Network as part of its series “The Burden of Poverty, a Backpack of Heartache,” shows a close correlation between poverty and performance in the 20 school districts in the Kent ISD. In almost all cases, the districts with the lowest family income levels also had the lowest scores on standardized tests.

 

In his book, Jensen, a former teacher who now presents on brain-based learning, explains that constant stressors affect the developing brain, “creating a devastating cumulative effect.”

 

“The prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, crucial for learning, cognition and working memory, are the areas of the brain most affected by cortisol, the so-called ‘stress hormone,'” he writes, citing brain research from various sources.

 

“Experiments have demonstrated that exposure to chronic and acute stress actually shrinks neurons in the brain’s frontal lobes–– an area that includes the prefrontal cortex and is responsible for such functions as making judgements, planning and regulating impulsivity and can modify and impair the hippocampus in ways that reduce learning capacity.”

The Jensen book study – which started by reading and discussing chapters – is a long-term project involving ongoing district-wide training, Assistant Superintendent Tammy Savage said.

A Board of Education committee dedicated to poverty is gathering information this year. Administrators and staff members are studying and attending seminars on poverty, have watched a webinar by Jensen and attended a two-day Michigan Department of Education session in November with Jensen on his book. They hope to bring him to Kelloggsville to present.
Gianchrist Mendez-Jimenez and Yuleika Gonzalez-Morales work on remembering a series of numbers. “9, 0, 1, 8, 6, and 2,’” said Gianchrist.

The goal is to apply some of his strategies in the classroom and embed tools to boost student effort and engagement, Savage said. It’s also about developing empathy and understanding of living situations many teachers haven’t experienced.

The district has long been aware of the high level of need and has worked hard to address it, she said. This is about going deeper and examining poverty from different perspectives. “There are a lot of things we are already doing. That was an affirmation for the district. We are already doing a lot of things to connect with students and parents.”
More than just brain development, training involves developing strong bonds with students, which leads to better achievement. “We are focused on student engagement, and it goes back to building relationships with kids,” Savage said. “Research has always proven that student/teacher relationship is key.”

Teachers are doing fast-track relationship builders, recommended by Jensen, in the classroom. For example, they share something personal with students once a week.

 

“In order to build a relationship with somebody, it can’t be one-sided. It can’t be just the students sharing,” Savage said. “Teachers have to share about themselves too. The more we share about ourselves, the more students are going to feel connected with us.”

 

Jensen also recommends staff members provide a favor or a show of empathy so powerful that students remember it well; invest two minutes a day for 10 consecutive days with the student who needs it most; and discover three things other than a name about a student each day, every day of the year.

 

Check out School News Network for more stories about students, schools, and faculty in West Michigan.

‘Ecce Homo’: Calvin art gallery explores the faces of Jesus

“Ecce Homo” (1969) by Salvador Dali, Lithograph. (Supplied)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

There may be no human faces in art more explored than those of Jesus of Nazareth and the Virgin Mary, and with Jesus there is a certain “historic” image of the man. But in the hands of artists such as Salvador Dali and Otto Dix, the accepted image is altered.

 

The current show at Calvin College’s Center Art Gallery, located in the Covenant Fine Arts Center, offers both the historic and altered images of the man in “Ecce Homo: Behold the Man”, currently running through March 4.

 

“Ecce Homo”, along with the companion exhibit “Most Highly Favored: The Life of the Virgin Mary”, are both drawn from the collection of Sandra Bowden, who with husband, Robert Bowden, have established the Sandra Bowden Art Scholarship at Calvin to “encourage Christian artists to prepare to become leaders in the field of art,” accord to the college.

 

“I feel like a caretaker, so to speak, of each piece in our collection, preserving it for the future,” Sandra Bowden said in supplied material. “The Bowden Collections focuses on religious art for several reasons: first, it is the subject I am most passionately interested in; second, it is a wonderful time to be collecting work with biblical themes because the art market in general is not particularly interested in art with religious content.

 

“I also feel that religious art needs exposure within the Christian community, and it is my intent to make these pieces available whenever possible for that purpose. I see my collector’s role as a calling — something that is critically important to do at this particular time.”

 

There are more than 20 works in the exhibit “Ecce Homo” — which is is Latin for “behold the man,” a declaration which refers to the presentation of Christ by the Roman ruler, Pontius Pilate, before the Jewish mob as described in the Bible in John 19. Among the artists included are Jacques Callot, George Rouault, Max Beckman, Bruce Herman, and Tyrus Clutter.

 

But it is the works of Dix and Dali that offer a non-traditional images worthy of fresh artistic consideration.

 

“Christus” (1957) by Otto Dix, lithograph. (Supplied)

“Christus”, by Dix (1891-1969), is a 1957 work shown in lithograph. According to supplied information by the gallery, Dix was “a German Expressionist artist who was defamed as ‘degenerate’ by the Nazis, created many works with biblical content, especially later in his life. This head of Christ titled, shows Christ with a crown of thorns and blood dripping down his face helping us consider Jesus’ suffering.”

 

“Ecce Homo”, by Dali (1904-1989) is a 1969 work shown in lithograph by the Spanish artistic giant. According to supplied information, the work is “one from a suite of 105 lithographs on heavy rag paper that illustrate the Bible. Guiseppe Albartto commissioned this suite in hopes of leading Dali to God and the Catholic Church. His Ecce Homo illustration is rich in content and shows the artist’s range of creativity and spontaneity. Dali employed the use of “bulletism,” a Dalinian invention where an arquebus (a type of antique gun) was loaded with ink-filled capsules and then fired at blank sheets of paper. The resulting patterns and designs were then incorporated into the illustration. We are left to imagine parts of the face of Jesus where the splatters merely suggest a crown of thorns and agonizing wounds.”

 

For more information visit calvin.edu/centerartgallery

 

School News Network: Board Member’s Bywords: Grit, Growth, and Giving Back

Kentwood School Board Vice President Allen Young (Photo courtesy of School News Network.)

By Erin Albanese

 

School News Network

 

If Kentwood Public Schools Board of Education Vice President Allen Young was standing in front of a classroom, he would tell students to never give up. He would tell them to use the “Kentwood grit” for which the the district is known, and which he himself has used plenty of.

 

“I would love for them, whatever dream they have, to make sure they follow it,” said Young, a board member since 2012. “I would have to be really honest with them because I would have to tell them that life brings about changes. There are going to be hills and valleys and curves in the road, but stick to it.”

 

Kentwood is all about the growth mindset, meaning that people can get smarter through hard work and practice, he said. “Keep exercising that brain. Don’t let it go soft, and also don’t be afraid to ask for help.”

 

Young, a maintenance coordinator for Linc Up, a community development organization in Kent County, grew up in Arkansas. He remembers being an average student who struggled in some classes. “I had to throw in a little extra grit,” he said.

 

But his goal was to graduate with honors, which he did in 1973, and enrolled in a trade school. He then worked in the metal distribution industry for many years before working in maintenance.

 

He and his wife, Johngerlyn Young, have one son, Austin, a 2014 East Kentwood graduate and now a sophomore at Morehouse College, in Atlanta.

 

For Young, serving on the board has always been about giving back. “I’ve always had the desire to help. I followed my son all the way from kindergarten through graduation, so I have a passion for education and for young people to improve themselves.”

 

He said the biggest challenge of the job, which requires about 10 hours of work per week, is dealing with the limits of the budget.

 

“You want to try to not cut anything, but sometimes you have to do that. We try not to do it so it’s going to be a detriment to the students. It can be painstaking.”

 

Boards of education are the frontline for parents and community members to address issues they feel strongly about. Young said he’s happy they come to him. “I don’t really accept those as complaints,” he insisted. “I accept them as concerns.”

 

When asked how much the stipend for board members is, Young had to ask a fellow board member. “I didn’t have a clue!” he said about the $40 per meeting rate.

 

Check out School News Network for more stories about students, schools, and faculty in West Michigan.

School News Network: Language, Culture and ‘Jambo!’

Editor’s Note: Places of Refuge is a series focusing on refugee students and their journeys, their new lives and hopes for a future in West Michigan, and the many ways schools and community organizations are working to meet their needs.

 

Tito Ekundat, teacher Rebecca Bing, and Toussaint Melchsedek give their Swahili greeting, “Jambo!” (Photo provided by School News Network.)

By Erin Albanese 

School News Network

 

Sixth grade teacher Rebecca Bing remembers a particularly tough day at school. She walked down the hall, feeling a little tired and pensive. Suddenly, Toussaint Melchsedek passed by, a big smile on his face, and said, “Jambo!”

 

“All of a sudden I felt so happy,” she told Toussaint, a sixth-grader, and Tito Ekundat, a fifth-grader, of the memory. “Whenever you guys talk to me it reminds me of home, and it makes me feel so thankful that I get to work here and that I get to speak with you guys.”

 

Toussaint Melchsedek, a refugee student from the Congo, is known around school for his big smile.

At Wyoming Intermediate School, “Jambo!” brings about lots of smiles. Whenever Bing sees Toussaint or Tito, they all wave with two hands and yell the Swahili greeting. Bing often has candy on hand for Tito, who has a sweet tooth.

 

“It’s candy, hugs and ‘Jambo!'” said Bing, with a laugh.

 

Toussaint and Tito are refugee children from the Congo region, which is made up of two war-torn countries along the Congo River in Central Africa. They immigrated to the U.S. with their families after living in refugee camps in Rwanda and Tanzania. This is Toussaint’s second year as a Wyoming student and Tito’s first. The boys speak Swahili and tribal languages, and have found a connection with Bing, who was raised in Africa by missionary parents.

 

Bing, who still calls Africa home, speaks Swahili, recently honing the language she had set aside for 17 years to help Toussaint and Tito. While they all speak different forms of the language, the trio is able to converse about school, sports, family life and much more.

 

“We make it work, don’t we?” Bing said to the boys.

 


Tito Ekundat, a refugee student from the Congo, takes notes with his fifth grade class

Bing helps provide communication to the boys’ parents. She led the effort to have the families fill out Christmas wish lists that led to many donations of toys and clothes from staff members. Toussaint, who speaks much more English than Tito, also helps translate for his younger friend.

 

“She’s so helpful,” said EL teacher Marissa Bliss about Bing’s work with the boys’ parents. “We’ve been able to communicate with the families. Having her experience and background builds the trust with them too. We’ve had a lot of success getting communication to the family. It makes a big difference.”

 

Bonding Over ‘Home’

Bing, who has taught in Wyoming Public Schools since 2014, was raised in Maryland until sixth grade, when she moved to Africa with her parents, Dale and Carol Linton, missionary teachers at an international school in Ethiopia and Kenya. Africa became Bing’s home until she returned to attend Hope College. “My memories are so rich… I loved the culture; I loved interacting with the people and all the friends I made. I really acclimated well to that being my home.”

 

Tito and Toussaint are getting used to their new home in the U.S., and share lots of good news with Bing. Toussaint recently learned to ride a bike, a skill he talks about with pride. He also likes being able to take hot showers, the changing seasons and that “we have money,” he said. He has learned to speak English and to read.

 

“I like America because you always have food and there’s no hunger. In Africa you have hunger,” he said.

 

Tito loves soccer and his house, and is clearly adored by his classmates, some of whom are also working to learn basic Swahili.

 

Bing remembers experiencing culture shock when she returned to the U.S. in 2000. She didn’t know what the internet was, hadn’t learned to drive and had forgotten about everyday American particulars, like that stores have automatic doors. “I was so out of tune with my age group,” she said.

 

At Wyoming Intermediate, Tito and Toussaint’s peers are happy to spend time getting to know the boys. “Students are very welcoming and eager to learn about your culture and to share,” Bing said. “It’s a great place to have that initial school experience…It welcomes that diversity.”

 

Tito and Toussaint remind Bing of her own childhood and the friends she made across the globe years ago. “I think it is just the biggest blessing to be able to work here and it’s so neat to see how it all comes together. It’s such a joy for me to come to school and see how little bits of that prior life come into my work life. I get to use (a language) I haven’t used in such a long time and interact with people from my homeland.”

 

Local high school sports schedule: Feb. 13-20

High school gymnastics is just one of the sports events happening over the next week.

Looking for a Wyoming and Kentwood area high school varsity sports event to get out to? Here is your weekly list.

 

Monday, Feb. 13, 2017

Boys/girls Bowling

Belding @ Kelloggsville

Unity Christian @ Wyoming

Wyoming Lee @ Hopkins

South Christian @ Zeeland

East Kentwood @ Grand Haven

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

Girls Cheer

Wyoming Lee @ FH Northern

Girls Basketball

WMAES @ West Michigan Lutheran

 

Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017

Girls Basketball

Zion Christian @ Fruitport Calvary Christian

Potter’s House @ Holland Black River

Wellspring Prep @ Grand River Prep

Holland Calvary @ West Michigan Aviation

Algoma Christian @ Tri-Unity Christian

Wyoming @ South Christian

Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

Boys Basketball

Zion Christian @ Fruitport Calvary Christian

Potter’s House @ Holland Black River

Wellspring Prep @ Grand River Prep

Algoma Christian @ West Michigan Aviation

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee

South Christian @ Wyoming

Godwin Heights @ Hopkins

Boys/Girls Bowling

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming

 

Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017

Boys/Girls Bowling

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville

Godwin Heights @ Wyoming Lee

East Kentwood @ Caledonia

Girls Cheer

Wyoming @ Comstock Park

 

Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017

Boys Basketball

Potter’s House @ Marcellus Howardsville Chrstian

Boys/Girls Bowling

Byron Center @ Wyoming

Boys Swimming

South Christian @ Ottawa Hills

Girls Gymnastics

East Kentwood @ Rockford

 

Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

Girls Basketball

Algoma Christian @ Zion Christian

Grand River Prep @ Holland Calvary

Holland Black River @ West Michigan Aviation

Tri-Unity Christian @ Covenant Christian

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

Wyoming @ Wayland

East Grand Rapids @ South Christian

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Godwin Heights @ Belding

Grattan @ West Michigan Lutheran

Boys Basketball

Algoma Christian @ Zion Christian

West Michigan Aviation @ Holland Black River

Tri-Unity Christian@ Covenant Christian

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

Wyoming @ Wayland

Wyoming Lee @ Holland Calvary

East Grand Rapids @ South Christian

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Godwin Heights @ Belding

Boys Hockey

Grand Rapids Flames @ West Michigan Aviation

Grandville @ East Kentwood

Girls Cheer

East Kentwood @ Caledonia – MHSAA State Districts

 

Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017

Boys Hockey

Flint Kearsley @ West Michigan Aviation

Girls Cheer

Kelloggsville @ Comstock Park – MHSAA State Districts

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park – MHSAA State Districts

Wyoming @ Kenowa Hills

Boys/Girls Bowling

Kelloggsville @ Hopkins

Wyoming Lee @ Hopkins

Godwin Heights @ Hopkins

Wyoming @ Christian

South Christian @ Christian

East Kentwood @ Grand Haven

Boys Wrestling

MHSAA State Regionals @ Pickney

 

Monday, Feb. 20, 2017

Girls Basketball

Godwin Heights @ Benton Harbor

West Michigan Lutheran @ Wellspring

 

Government Matters: Opposing views on DeVos confirmation

News of Your Government

WKTV Staff

 

Following the U.S. Senate confirmation of West Michigan’s Betsy DeVos as President Donald Trump’s choice for Secretary of Education, local U.S. Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-MI) and U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) had very different responses.

 

Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-MI)

Rep. Huizenga, in a Wednesday, Feb. 8, post on his Facebook account, said: “Congratulations to West Michigan’s own Betsy DeVos on being confirmed by the Senate as the next Secretary of Education. Betsy will work tirelessly and fight to ensure that every child in America, no matter their zip code, has access to a quality education.”

 

Sen. Stabenow was not quite so congratulatory.

 

Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)

In a Feb. 8 supplied statement, Sen. Stabenow said: “I am deeply disappointed that Senate Republicans confirmed Betsy DeVos to lead the Department of Education. I’ve heard from an overwhelming number of Michigan families who have shared their strong concerns about her long record of pushing policies that have seriously undermined public education in Michigan and failed our children. That is why I joined with half of my Senate colleagues, including two Republicans, to oppose her nomination.”

 

Sen. Peters comments on President’s nomination for Supreme Court

 

U.S. Senator Gary Peters (D -MI), on Feb. 1, issued the following statement on President Donald Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch, who currently serves on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States:

 

U.S. Sen. Gary Peters (D-MI)

“Just as President Obama did, President Trump has a constitutional responsibility to nominate Justices to fill vacancies on the Supreme Court, and the U.S. Senate has a constitutional responsibility to consider those nominees. For 293 days, Senate Republicans failed to fulfill that duty by denying President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland, the same thorough and public consideration process that they are now urging for President Trump’s nominee.

 

“I take very seriously the Senate’s responsibility to advise and consent on all nominees, and every individual who could be serving on our nation’s highest court deserves to be fully vetted. As President Trump’s nominee moves through the judicial hearing process, I will be carefully reviewing his qualifications to serve on the Supreme Court, which is a pillar of American democracy.”

 

Sen. Peters introduces Legislation Helps Protect Domestic Violence Victims and Their Pets

 

U.S. Senators Gary Peters (D-MI), along with Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV), on Feb. 8, reintroduced the Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act, legislation to protect victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and dating violence from emotional and psychological trauma caused by violence against their pets.

 

Multiple studies have shown that domestic abusers often seek to manipulate or intimidate their victims by threatening or harming their pets, but according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), only three percent of domestic violence shelters across the country accept pets. Similar legislation is being introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

 

“Abusers often exploit the emotional attachment victims have with their pets, leaving victims of domestic violence stuck choosing between their own safety or leaving a beloved pet in harm’s way,” Sen. Peters said in supplied material. “I’m proud to join my colleagues in introducing this bipartisan legislation that will help empower victims to leave abusive situations, get a fresh start and keep their pets who are treasured members of their families.”