Category Archives: Area Education

Business leaders, WAR host human trafficking conference in Grand Rapids

Women at Risk International (WAR) will lead a discussion July 20 on the dangers of human trafficking as well as provide resources to help combat this growing crime against women, children and others. (Supplied)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

Tourism and hospitality industry leaders will be meeting with the local chapter of Women at Risk International (WAR) on July 20 for a day-long session to help educate the business community on the dangers of human trafficking as well as provide resources to help combat this growing crime against women, children and others.

 

But those interested in simply getting more information on the issue are invited to attend.

 

“The event is open to anyone who would like to attend, but much of the information will be focused in toward hospitality and tourism related businesses,” said Dianna Stampfler, executive director of the Kent County Hospitality Association. “Much of the underlying information and statistics however will be related to anyone interested in learning more about this epidemic.”

 

For a story on how one local college student became involved, see WKTV’s story here.

 

The event is Thursday, July 20, from 9 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. at the downtown Grand Rapids Courtyard Marriott. The conference is sponsored by the Kent County Hospitality Association, Women in Lodging-Grand Rapids and Experience Grand Rapids.

 

According to supplied information, Michigan is one of the leading states for human trafficking — a modern-day form of slavery. It is defined but the U.S. Department of State as: the “recruiting, harboring, transportation, providing, or obtaining of a person for compelled labor or commercial sex acts through force, fraud, or coercion”.

 

Human trafficking affects over 20 million victims worldwide, according to the Polaris Project, with a total market value of over $32 billion. More than 1.2 million children are trafficked each year and this epidemic affects at least 161 countries worldwide. Between 100,000 and 300,000 underage girls are sold for sex in the United States every year.

 

According to WAR, in many instances, hotels and motels, in both rural and urban areas are prime locations for human trafficking activity. And, when there are major influxes of people — such as during major events like ArtPrize — cases often soar.

 

The conference will allow tourism and hospitality professionals to find out why such activity is bad for business, how to be on the lookout for this crime and how to report suspicious activity.

 

The cost of the conference is $35 per person, with registration available by visiting here.

 

Get ’em outside: Godfrey-Lee Early Childhood Center opens outdoor learning lab

Godfrey-Lee Early Childhood Center math coach Debbie Schuitema, right, and David Britton, retiring superintendent of Godfrey-Lee Public Schools, could not keep the students at the from jumping the gun on the ribbon cutting of a new outdoor classroom. (WKTV/K.D. Norris)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

There was a classroom full of kids playing outdoors of the Godfrey-Lee Early Childhood Center building Thursday, June 8, as the school district held the grand opening of its new Outdoor Learning Lab.

 

The adults present — including the incoming superintendents of Godfrey-Lee Public Schools — spoke about the “educational” advantages of the facility. The kids? They just liked being able to climb on things and roll down a hill and dig in the sand.

 

And that is just the way the two teachers who spearheaded the project — Debbie Schuitema and Julie Swanson — wants it: an outdoor education opportunity that looks a lot like play.

 

Debbie Schuitema, left, and Julie Swanson. (WKTV)

“Students are naturally curious, and when you bring them out here, without books, when you take a way some of the parameters, and rules and procedures, you allow them to be creative, curious and intuitive,” Schuitema, who teaches math at the center, said to WKTV. “The things they come up with is just amazing, and that leads to more learning. You can take that back inside and build on that.”

 

The facility, located to the east side of the Early Childhood Center (ECC) building at 961 Joosten SW in Wyoming, includes mostly natural objects which kids can explore and play with: a tree stump, a stone and sand structure, a grassy hill.

 

And Swanson, a physical education instructor at the center, knows the value of outdoor exercise as part of a student’s educational process.

 

“Discover yourself through play,” Swanson said. “Just something as simple as which way to you hold a big branch, little side up or big side up? They are learning engineering skills, math skills. … They learn gravity by rolling down a hill. … Really just discovering a new way to learn, but they don’t know they are learning. … (We are just) removing the walls.”

 

The grand opening event featured permanent and temporary activities such as a mud kitchen, rock grotto, climbing hill, landscape berm, covered gathering space/stage, dead tree stands, Congo drums, weaving loom and log steps.

 

David Britton, left, and incoming new superintendent Kevin Polston. (WKTV/K.D. Norris)

But the most important things the facility brings is the ability just to be outdoors, according to soon-to-retire district superintendent David Britten, who was present at the event along with the incoming new superintendent Kevin Polston.

 

“Kids today are spending far too much time indoors — it is a criticism of education in general. We are far too focused on content learning and memorization and test taking,” said Britten, who was a big supporter of the project. “We have lost some of these outdoor areas, places for kids to play in.

 

“So, as I walked along here a few years back, looking for historical artifacts, I thought: What a great place to have kids come out on a regular basis, and learn,” he said. “Find what native plant species that are here, what are invasive; what kind of birds and animals live in this environment. How can we make it better for them? How can we keep plaster creek clean? How can we protect the environment itself, so we can all enjoy it.”

 

Aside from the support of the superintendent, other supporters thanked at the facility opening include Women Who Care Grand Rapids, City of Wyoming Public Works, Dykema Excavators, DeWitt Landscape and Design, TonTin Lumber and The Stone Zone.

 

Special thanks were also given to East Lee students, Lee Middle School students, the Plaster Creek Watershed, Groundswell and — especially — the Godfrey Lee Board of Education.

 

“So many different people donated their time and energy to this,” said Swanson. “The Godfrey-Lee board of education, allowing us to do this without strings attached — that allowed us to be so creative. We really want to thank our board and our superintendent.”

 

St. Cecilia offers summer music camps for all ages

St. Cecilia Music Center’s summer piano camp will be starting in June. (Supplied)

St. Cecilia Music Center

 

St. Cecilia Music Center will continue is offerings of music training for children this summer with their Stella Royce Piano Camp for students ages 7-15. In addition, it will offer a fun and relaxed adult camp opportunity called Grand Band Camp for older school aged students (age 12 and older) and adults.

 

The Grand Band Camp will be held Monday though Thursday, June 12-15, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. On Thursday, June 15, a final concert will be performed outdoor at the Gerald R. Ford Museum at approximately 11:30 a.m.

 

St. Cecilia welcomes musicians from around the community to participate in this casual and fun music experience where site reading can be practiced and a variety of music will be played, including great band favorites. Tuition per person is $45 and the registration deadline is June 8.

 

St. Cecilia also presents the 10th annual Stella Royce Piano Camp, July 10-14, 2017 from 8:40 a.m. to 3 p.m., offering an engaging and educational experience for young pianists 7-15 years of age. Optional free YMCA playtime is also offered Monday through Thursday from 3-5 p.m. after camp concludes.

 

Every year during the piano camp, students work with a new-featured composer and perform ensemble pieces written by that composer. This year, nationally renowned composer and master class teacher Mary Leaf from FJH Music Company will join the students to help prepare them for performing. Other talented faculty will also be involved in teaching and supervising all activities of the students throughout the week.

 

Daily music activities include individual and ensemble lessons, theory and ear training, music composition and music history, supervised practice time and master classes with composer Mary Leaf. In addition, special events are held each day, including solo and ensemble master classes, composition workshops, and time with the featured composer.

 

The final day of camp, Friday, July 14, a celebratory recital will take place where each student will perform music composed by Leaf, within an ensemble group. An ice cream social will take place after Friday’s recital. Each student will also perform solo, other music compositions, during a recital on Thursday afternoon. Tuition is $375. The registration deadline is June 15.

 

To register for the Grand Band Camp or the Stella Royce Piano Camp visit SCMC-online.org. For more information call education director Martha Bundra at 616-459-2224 ext. 206.

 

Blandford Nature Center kicks off summer activities with Farm Day Open House May 27

By Blandford Nature Center

 

Summer is knocking on our door, and Blandford Nature Center seems as busy as ever. As we close out the end of the school year, prepare for Summer Day Camps, and develop our Community Programs for the upcoming months, we have many openings for volunteers to come out during this busy, sunny season. Check out the Volunteer Opportunities below to get a sneak peek of all the things happening around Blandford!

Farm Day Open House

When: 10 a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday, May 27

 

Don’t miss this family friendly event down on the farm! Meet the goats, chickens, and pigs; say ‘hi’ to your local farmers; check out our plant sale; listen to a story; and play some games. This is a great option for a Memorial Day ‘stay-cation’.

 

Volunteer for this Event

Longest Day 5K

2017 marks the 6th year of Blandford Nature Center’s fundraising trail run/walk! Join us for an evening of fitness, food, and fun. Run or walk the trails through Blandford’s property. Afterwards, celebrate the summer solstice with us at our Summer Celebration!

  • Where: Blandford Farm
  • When: 4-9 p.m. on Friday, June 23

Volunteer for this Event

Spring Planting Days

As the temperatures rise and the sun shines brighter, Blandford is preparing to take on a few landscaping projects in the various gardens and green spaces around BNC. We need help planting.

We’ll be making several trips to buy/collect native plants from local nurseries so there will be a variety of days available for planting. Please specify a time frame during that day’s open hours so we can plan accordingly.

  • Where: Blandford Nature Center
  • When: Various dates

Volunteer for this Event

Eco-Stewardship Work Days

Eco-Stewardship work focuses on habitat restoration, trail restoration, stream clean-up and removal of invasive species on several sections of our 264-acre site.

  • Where: Blandford Nature Center
  • When: Various dates

Volunteer for this Event

Farm Work Days

NEW THIS YEAR! Perfect for volunteers who want to get their veggies on and hands dirty. Currently offered once a month with the potential to add more days as the season becomes busier.

  • Where: Blandford Farm
  • When: Various dates

Volunteer for this Event

 

Blandford Nature Center is located at 1715 Hillburn Ave. NW in Grand Rapids. For more info, call 616.735.6240.

 

All registration fees and donations will be used to further Blandford Nature Center’s mission to engage and empower our community through enriching experiences in nature.

WKTV’s high school coverage takes week off, but live action available

Softball is just one of several high school sports nearing the end of their season. Catch a game today!

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

There are plenty of local high school sports events to check out this week — including the beginnings of state playoffs for tennis and track — but the WKTV truck and crews will not be back covering games until next week.

 

The final spring game coverage will be:

Wednesday, May 24 – Boys Baseball, Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat later in the week — Wednesday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

The complete list of local high school sports events this week due to spring break is as follows:

 

Monday, May 15

Boys baseball

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Christian

Kelloggsville @ Belding

South Christian @ Covenant Christian – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ Potter’sHouse – DH

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Cristian – DH

Kelloggsville @ Belding – DH

South Christian @ Covenant Christian – DH

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls soccer

Godwin Heights @ Covenant Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming @ FH Eastern

West Michigan Aviation @ Fruitport Calvary

South Christian @ Christian

Belding @ Wyoming Lee

Boys golf

Comstock Park @ Wyoming

East Kentwood @ Muskegon Mona Shores

Girls tennis

South Christian @ Zeeland East

 

Tuesday, May 16

Girls Tennis

Western Michigan Christian @ Kelloggsville

North Muskegon @ South Christian

Boys baseball

Wyoming @ Kenowa Hills

Middleville T-K @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville – DH

Girls softball

Wyoming @ Kenowa Hills – DH

Middleville T-K @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville – DH

Girls soccer

Hudsonville Hornets @ West Michigan Aviation

Tri-Unity Christian @ Holland Calvary

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Boys golf

Caledonia @ East Kentwood – OK Red Jamboree @ Stone Water

 

Wednesday, May 17

Girls soccer

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights

Wyoming @ Wayland

Wyoming Lee @ Calvin Christian

Boys golf

Kelloggsville – OK Silver Conference Tournament at The Meadows

Wyoming @ FH Eastern – OK Gold Jamboree @ Egypt Valley

South Christian @ FH Eastern – OK Gold Jamboree @ Egypt Valley

Boys baseball

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

Tri-Unity Christian vs Holland Black River @ Fifth Third Ballpark – DH

Belding @ Wyoming Lee

Girls softball 

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

Belding @ Wyoming Lee

 

Thursday, May 18

Boys baseball

Tri-Unity Christian @ Godwin Heights

West Michigan Aviation @ Potter’s House

South Christian @ Middleville T-K

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Boys lacrosse

Catholic Central @ South Christian

Girls soccer

East Grand Rapids @ South Christian

Tri-Unity Christian @ Holland Black River

Rockford @ East Kentwood

Girls tennis

East Kentwood vs TBD @ Holland – MHSAA State Regionals

Girls softball

Rockford @ East Kentwood

 

Friday, May 19

Boys and girls track

Division 1 MHSAA State Regionals @ Kalamazoo-Loy Norrix

Division 2 MHSAA State Regionals @ Houseman Field

Division 3 MHSAA State regionals @ Saugatuck

Division 4 MHSAA State Regionals @ Holton

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park

Ottawa Hills @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming @ West Ottawa – DH

South Christian @ Zeeland East – DH

Girls soccer

Godwin Heights @ Belding

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Boys baseball

Godwin Heights @ Union

West Michigan Aviation @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming @ West Ottawa – DH

Girls tennis

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park

Kelloggsville @ Christian – MHSAA State Regionals

Girls water polo

@ TBA – MHSAA State Regionals

 

Saturday, May 20

Boys baseball

West Michigan Aviation @ Bloomingdale – DH

Auburn Hills Oakland Christian @ Potter’s House – DH

East Kentwood @ Lakeview – DH

Zion Christian @ Mason County Eastern

Zion Christian @ Western Michigan Christian

Wyoming Lee @ Saranac

Girls soccer

Zion Christian @ West Michigan Aviation

Boys and girls track

Division 1 MHSAA State Regionals @ Kalamazoo-Loy Norrix

Division 2 MHSAA State Regionals @ Houseman Field

Division 4 MHSAA State Regionals @ Holton

Girls water polo

@ TBA – MHSAA State Regionals

Girls softball

Muskegon Reeths-Puffer @ East Kentwood – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Saranac

Boys golf

East Kentwood vs TBA @ The Mines

 

Monday, May 22

Boys baseball

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights

South Christian @ Unity Christian

Kenowa Hills @ East Kentwood

Hopkins @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls softball

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights – DH

FH Central @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Kenowa Hills

Hopkins @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls soccer

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

Belding @ Kelloggsville

West Michigan Aviation @ Barry County Christian

Wyoming Lee @ Hopkins

Boys golf

Wyoming @ Christian – OK Gold Conference Meet @ Thornapple Pointe

South Christian @ Christian – OK Gold Conference Meet @ Thornapple Pointe

Girls soccer

South Christian @ Middleville T-K

 

GVSU reports regional impact of $816 million

 

By Mary Eilleen Lyon, Grand Valley State University


The annual economic impact that Grand Valley State University (GVSU) has on the region is estimated at $816 million. Grand Valley issued its yearly tri-county economic impact report during its April 28 Board of Trustees meeting held at the L. William Seidman Center on the Pew Grand Rapids Campus.


The economic impact report covers Kent, Ottawa and Muskegon counties and used 2015-2016 data. Grand Valley employs more than 3,600 people and enrolls more than 25,400 students who spend money and pay taxes in the region.


Some additional highlights of this year’s report include:

  • New construction and renovations pumped more than $83 million into the local economy in 2016, creating more than 1,760 trade and construction jobs.
  • Construction of the $37.5 million Raleigh J. Finkelstein Hall will be finished in May 2018 and will expand Grand Valley’s health campus in Grand Rapids.
  • On the Allendale Campus, an addition to the Performing Arts Center will add 44,000-square-feet of additional space to the existing building. The $20-million project will be finished in August.
  • Grand Valley alumni now number more than 106,000 and nearly half are living or working in West Michigan’s tri-county area.

The entire Economic Impact brochure can be found at http://www.gvsu.edu/economicimpact.


For more information on Grand Valley’s impact visit www.gvsu.edu/accountability.


In other board action/discussion, the board approved a resolution for:

  • Reauthorization of three charter schools (Global Heights Academy in Dearborn Heights, Legacy Charter Academy in Detroit, Statewide Cyber);
  • The authorization of a new school (Flint Cultural Center STEAM Academy);
  • The approval of a site addition for another school (Michigan Mathematics and Science Academy in Center Line);
  • The merger of Detroit Achievement Academy and Detroit Prep;
  • The approval of new Charter Contract Terms and Conditions for 6a, 6e, and 6c schools;
  • The appointment or reappointment of charter school board members to GVSU-authorized public school academy boards.

 

6th Annual KCPC Above the Influence-Kent County ‘Recode’ Youth Summit set for May 12

 

By Kent County Prevention Coalition

 

The Above the Influence [ATI]Kent County Youth Summit is a Generation Y- and Z-driven conference powered by the Kent County Prevention Coalition (KCPC).

 

Birthed out of a vision to empower community youth, The Summit is designed to equip middle and high school youth to think critically about personal choices and future ambitions, emerging community health and wellness trends related to underage substance use/misuse, and the power community teens have individually and collectively to impact peers, family and community norms and the world by making a personal commitment to live Above the Influence.

 

This year’s ‘Summit: Recode‘ is all about encouraging this generation to take a stand and to drive positive change in the community, while transforming health and wellness trends and overcoming pop culture messages that suggest that alcohol, tobacco and other drugs are not harmful. Ultimately, this year’s theme speaks to Summit 2017’s goal of empowering and equipping every attendee to excel individually, lead socially and revolutionize their families, schools and community by living Above the Influence.

 

The Summit is designed to:

  • Engage youth in being visible, valuable and vocal to underage substance use prevention efforts in Kent County
  • Champion the voices and engagement of youth in the work of underage substance use prevention
  • Understand the underage substance use issues and emerging trends in Kent County
  • Engage youth as investors in the health and wellness of Kent County
  • Develop adolescent leadership skills and talents
  • Foster relationship-building among teens across the county, state and region
  • Create opportunities for youth to engage community leaders and elected officials
  • Uses innovation, art, technology and media to deliver prevention messages

The Kent County Prevention Coalition (KCPC) is a team of 25+ member organizations who all share a genuine concern for improving the health and wellness of the community. They band together to change community conditions, norms, systems and policies in a variety of creative ways.

 

The organization’s purpose is to prevent and reduce substance use behaviors in Kent County with a focus on youth. They are committed to being visible, valuable and vocal in the work of substance abuse prevention.

 

The work of the coalition is about people, passion, partnerships and performance. These goals are achieved by taking prevention to culture. Rather urban, suburban or rural, these issues impact where people work, live, play, learn and worship.

Details

Date:

Friday, May 12, 2017


Time:

8 am-2 pm


Venue:

DeVos Place Convention Center

303 Monroe Ave. NW

Grand Rapids, MI 49503


This event is FREE.


For more info, contact Michele Stitt, KCPC at michele.stitt@network180.org or call 616.855.5298.

School News Network: Settling conflict by settling minds with connective art

Student-made mandala supports Restorative Justice

By Erin Albanese School News Network

 

With colorful petals radiating from a bright orange center, the mandala Circle of Art rug represents the universe and all its connectivity.

 

For members of Wyoming High School’s National Art Honor Society, it’s also a way of connecting with a program right in their school that helps reduce conflict and unite people.

 

Sinai Salvador, Cecilia Medina and Bekah Luce created the mandala Circle of Art to symbolize restorative justice

NAHS members and juniors Sinai Salvador, Cecilia Medina and Bekah Luce created the rug at the request of Marilyn Booker, who facilitates restorative justice circles at the high school. Booker wanted a symbol that complemented her practice, and students came up with the design. They showcased the rug at the district’s recent Fine Arts Festival.

 

Restorative justice, an outreach of the Grand Rapids-based nonprofit Dispute Resolution Center of West Michigan that started at the high school last school year, is a non-punitive, conflict-resolution program that helps students solve differences using trained mediators.

 

Connecting, Uniting, Restoring

In restorative circles, students who are having conflicts tell each other through guided conversation with Booker what’s on their minds. They hold something, like a squishy ball, to indicate their turn to speak. The goal is to reduce suspensions and address harmful behaviors in a therapeutic way. It has been successful and was expanded to the junior high this school year.

 

Booker lays the rug on the floor in the middle of the circles to give students a focal point if they aren’t quite ready to meet eye-to-eye.

 

“We made the rug to help relieve anxiety with these groups,” said Bekah. “A lot of times the kids don’t feel comfortable and don’t know where to look.”

 

The circle is a universal and eternal symbol seen in many aspects of life: the sun, the moon, the earth and the universe. Conflict is also a universal and eternal issue in society, Booker said: “In a circle, there is no disconnect. We are all connected in some way, shape, or form. … Part of doing circles is every voice is important.

 

“We are restoring kids instead of pushing them out,” she said.

 

Wyoming is a very diverse district, the fourth most diverse in the state, according to the website, Niche. In that context, Sinai explained the depth she sees in the piece.

 

“You can think of all the colors we connected in the mandala rug as all the races that are connected in our school society,” Sinai said. “That’s why it’s used in the restorative program. It gets everyone together.”

 

She sees the school’s diversity as a plus for understanding, noting “we all get along. It doesn’t matter where you come from, we all understand that we have different customs, but we all come together because we are all equal.

 

Restorative justice facilitator Marilyn Booker (far left) hosts a Restorative Circle, with the mandala rug in the center, with, from left, students Kiara Kornoelje, Ashley Elliott, Makenna Vanderstolp and Shay Sees

“It’s a way for the school environment to flourish. That’s also why we picked the flower.”

 

Art and Its Many Connections

Wyoming High’s National Art Honor Society, which includes 21 students, focuses on creating art that connects with the greater community, school community and with themselves, said adviser and art teacher Robin Gransow-Higley.

 

In 1978, the National Art Education Association began the NAHS program to inspire and recognize students who have shown an outstanding ability and interest in art, though it’s open to all students.

 

Wyoming NAHS students organized the district’s recent Fine Arts Festival, which included works from those in grades K-12, plus choir and theater performances, demonstrations by various clubs, face-painting and other activities. Students are also creating a mural representing student athletics and activities.

 

The club aims to encircle the community it its own way, through art, Higley said.

 

“They connect with the greater community, school community and with themselves,” she said.

Baseball, softball scheduled for WKTV’s featured high school coverage

Softball action from Godwin Heights High School will be one of the featured games on WKTV this week.

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

The WKTV truck and the crews will continue to bring various events to the airwaves this spring and this week we will be at South Christian for a baseball game and at Godwin Heights for a softball — and check out next week’s schedule of water polo coverage!

 

The tentative April schedule for WKTV coverage is:

Tuesday, April 18 Baseball, Wyoming @ South Christian

Thursday, April 20 Softball Union @ Godwin Heights

Tuesday, April 25 Water polo, Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

Thursday, April 27 Water Polo West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on later in the week — the Tuesday games will be rebroadcast Wednesdays at 5 p.m., and the Wednesday and Thursday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

The complete list of local high school sports events this week due to spring break is as follows:

 

Monday, April 17

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

East Kentwood @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

Girls Tennis

Wyoming @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

East Kentwood @ Byron Center

Boys Lacrosse

Comstock Park @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ Wayland

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee

Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

Boys Baseball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

West Michigan Aviation @ Tri-Unity Christian – DH

Potter’s House @ Kelloggsville – DH

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Softball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee – DH

 

Tuesday April 18

Boys Baseball

Wyoming @ South Christian – DH

Holland Black River @ Potter’s House – DH

Zion Christian @ Saranac – DH

East Kentwood @ West Ottawa – DH

West Michigan Lutheran @ Three Oaks River Valley

Girls Softball

Wyoming @ South Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ West Ottawa – DH

Girls Soccer 

Godwin Heights @ Potter’s House

Wellsprings Prep @ Tri-Unity Christian

Union @ West Michigan Aviation

Zion Christian @ Calvary Christian

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Boys Golf

East Kentwood @ Grand Haven – OK Red Jamboree

Boys/Girls Track

East Kentwood @ Grandville

Wyoming Lee @ Belding

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville

 

Wednesday April 19

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Christian – OK Gold Jamboree @ Quail Ridge

Wyoming @ Christian – OK Gold Jamboree @ Quail Ridge

Girls Tennis

Wayland @ South Christian

West Catholic @ Kelloggsville

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Boys/Girls Track

South Christian @ FH Eastern

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K

Girls Soccer

Christian @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

FH Eastern @ Wyoming

Wyoming Lee @ Belding

Boys Baseball 

Belding @ Kelloggsville

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

West Michigan Aviation @ Hopkins

Wyoming Lee @ Calvin Christian

Girls Softball 

Belding @ Kelloggsville

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

Wyoming Lee @ Calvin Christian

 

Thursday April 20

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Unity Christian

Kelloggsville @ Delton-Kellogg – Delton-Kellogg Invitational

Wyoming @ Holland

East Kentwood @ Caledonia – OK Red Jamboree

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ Wyoming

Wellsprings Prep @ Tri-Unity Christian – DH

Barry County Christian @ Zion Christian

West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

Girls Softball

Unity Christian @ South Christian – DH

Union @ Godwin Heights – DH

Wyoming @ Byron Center

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Boys/Girls Track 

Kelloggsville @ Godwin Heights

Caledonia @ East Kentwood

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Soccer

Tri-Unity Christian @ Zion Christian

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville

Girls Tennis

Kenowa Hills @ East Kentwood

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Zeeland East

 

Friday April 21

Girls Softball

Byron Center @ South Christian – DH

Hastings @ Kelloggsville – DH

Ottawa Hills @ Godwin Heights

Boys Baseball

Byron Center @ South Christian – DH

Potter’s House @ Kelloggsville – DH

West Michigan Aviation @ Godwin Heights – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ NorthPointe Christian

Boys Lacrosse

Jenison @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ Caledonia

Hudsonville Hornets @ Godwin Heights

Allendale @ Wyoming

Potter’s House @ Delton Kellogg

Middleville T-K @ East Kentwood

Kent City @ Wyoming Lee

Boys/Girls Track 

Wyoming @ Hastings

Girls Tennis 

Northview @ Wyoming

Girls Water Polo

@ East Kentwood – EK Invite

 

Saturday April 22

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ AA Greenhills – Gryphon Invite

Hastings @ Kelloggsville – Rocket Invitational

Wyoming @ Hamilton

East Kentwood @ Holt

@ Wyoming Lee – Soils Invitational

Boys/Girls Track 

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee – Lee Invite

West Michigan Aviation @ Wyoming Lee – Lee Invite

Boys Baseball 

Godwin Heights @ Wyoming Lee – Rebel Invitational

Heritage Christian @ Zion Christian – DH

East Kentwood @ Catholic Central

Girls Softball 

Wyoming @ Muskegon Reeths-Puffer

East Kentwood @ Muskegon Mona Shores – DH

@ Wyoming Lee – Rebel Invitational

Girls Water Polo

@ East Kentwood – EK Invite

 

Monday April 24

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Middleville T-K – OK Gold Jamboree @ Yankee Springs

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K – OK Gold Jamboree @ Yankee Springs

Wellsprings Prep @ Kelloggsville

East Kentwood @ Rockford

Girls Tennis

Christian @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Comstock Park

Wyoming @ FH Eastern

East Kentwood @ Rockford

Girls Softball

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville – DH

Godwin Heights @ Western Michigan Christian – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Belding – DH

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ Holland Christian

Calvin Christian @ Kelloggsville

West Michigan Aviation @ Holland Calvary – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Belding

Boys Lacrosse

South Christian @ Catholic Central

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ East Grand Rapids

Godwin Heights @ Kelloggsville

Wayland @ Wyoming

South Haven @ West Michigan Aviation

Crossroads Charter @ Zion Christian

Calvin Christian @ Wyoming Lee

 

Local high school sports schedule: April 10-17

High school baseball and softball seasons are in full swing. Check out a ball game. (WKTV)

By Mike Moll

sports@wktv.org

 

Spring weather, and spring high school, sports are now in full swing —  “Play Ball! So, if you are looking for a Wyoming and Kentwood area high school varsity sports event to get out to, here is your weekly list.

 

Monday, April 10

Boys baseball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights

Girls softball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights – DH

 

Tuesday, April 11

Girls Tennis 

Cookie Invite @ South Christian

Jenison @ Wyoming

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ FH Eastern – DH

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming – DH

Tri-Unity Christian @ Potter’s House – DH

West Michigan Aviation @ Bloomingdale – DH

Grand River Prep @ Zion Christian

Grandville @ East Kentwood – DH

Girls Softball

South Christian @ FH Eastern – DH

Coopersville @ Godwin Heights

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming – DH

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ FH Eastern

Kelloggsville @ Tri-Unity Christian

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming

Hope Academy @ West Michigan Aviation

Potter’s House @ Zion Christian

Caledonia @ East Kentwood

Boys Golf 

Kelloggsville @ Hastings – Scrimmage

Boys/Girls Track 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

West Michigan Aviation @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Water Polo

Portage Central @ East Kentwood

 

Wednesday, April 12

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Calvin Christian

East Kentwood @ Grandville – OK Red Jamboree

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ FH Eastern

Union @ Kelloggsville

Middleville T-K @ Wyoming

Boys/Girls Track

South Christian @ Christian

Boys Lacrosse

South Christian @ Zeeland

Boys Baseball 

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

Godwin Heights @ Belding

FH Central @ Wyoming

Girls Softball 

Kelloggsville @ NorthPointe Christian

Godwin Heights @ Belding

FH Central @ Wyoming – DH

Girls Soccer 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Water Polo

Grandville @ East Kentwood

 

Thursday, April 13

Boys Golf

South Christian – Kent County Classic @ Thornapple Pointe

East Kentwood – Kent County Classic @ Thornapple Pointe

Boys Baseball  

FH Eastern @ South Christian

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K

Covenant Christian @ Tri-Unity Christian

Grand Rapids Crusaders @ Zion Christian

East Kentwood @ Grandville

Holland Calvary @ Wyoming Lee – DH

Girls Softball

Caledonia @ South Christian – DH

Wyoming @ Grandville

Unity Christian @ East Kentwood

Boys Lacrosse

Muskegon Reeths-Puffer @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

Wyoming @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Union

Potter’s House @ Tri-Unity Christian

Grand River Prep @ Zion Christian

Boys/Girls Track 

Wyoming Lee @ Kelloggsville

Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

Rockford @ East Kentwood

Girls Tennis

@ East Kentwood – EK Quad

 

Friday, April 14

Boys Golf 

Wyoming @ Kelloggsville

Girls Softball 

Western Michigan Christian @ Kelloggsville

Girls Soccer 

West Ottawa @ Wyoming

West Michigan Aviation @ Wyoming Lee

Northview @ East Kentwood

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Jenison

 

Saturday, April 15

Boys/Girls Track

South Christian @ Unity Christian

Kelloggsville @ Coopersville – Bronco Classic

Wyoming @ Comstock Park

West Michigan Aviation @ Lakewood – Lakewood Invitational

East Kentwood @ Mansfield/Mehock Relays

Boys Baseball

South Christian @ East Kentwood – EK Invite

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming – Wyoming Tournament

Godwin Heights @ Wyoming – Wyoming Tournament-

Wyoming Lee @ Union – DH

Girls Softball

South Christian @ East Kentwood – EK Invite

Girls Tennis

South Christian @ East Kentwood

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming – Wyoming Invitational

Girls Water Polo

East Kentwood @ Jenison

 

Sunday, April 16

EASTER SUNDAY

 

Monday, April 17

Boys Golf

South Christian @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

East Kentwood @ Forest Hills Invite – Egypt Valley

Girls Tennis

Wyoming @ South Christian

Kelloggsville @ Calvin Christian

East Kentwood @ Byron Center

Boys Lacrosse

Comstock Park @ South Christian

Girls Soccer

South Christian @ Wayland

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee

Hopkins @ Godwin Heights

East Grand Rapids @ Wyoming

Boys Baseball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

West Michigan Aviation @ Tri-Unity Christian – DH

Potter’s House @ Kelloggsville – DH

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee

Girls Softball 

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

NorthPointe Christian @ Wyoming Lee – DH

 

After exciting winter of high school sports, WKTV’s spring coverage starts

High School girls water polo is on the schedule for WKTV coverage this spring.

By Mike Moll

WKTV Sports

 

The winter schedules wrapped up in March with a couple of our local teams showing very well in the state tournament. In the boys Class D tournament, Tri-Unity Christian made it to the state quarterfinals before falling to eventual state runner-up Buckley by 11 points. The girls side had the East Kentwood Lady Falcons getting into the championship game in Class A before losing for just the second time all season, to Flushing, also by 11.

 

The WKTV truck and the crews will continue to bring various events to the airwaves this spring and including, for the first time, in addition to baseball and softball, we will be covering girls water polo.

 

The tentative April schedule for WKTV coverage is:

Tuesday, April 11: Baseball, Grandville @ East Kentwood

Wednesday, April 12: Water polo, Grandville @ East Kentwood

Tuesday, April 18: Baseball, Wyoming @ South Christian

Thursday, April 20: Softball Union @ Godwin Heights

Tuesday, April 25: Water polo, Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

Thursday, April 27: Water Polo West Ottawa @ East Kentwood

 

Each game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on later in the week — the Tuesday games will be rebroadcast Wednesdays at 5 p.m., and the Wednesday and Thursday games will be rebroadcast Saturdays at 11 a.m. — on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood.

 

Local high school sports events are limited this week due to spring break. They are as follows:

 

Saturday, April 8

Girls softball

Godwin Heights @ Comstock Park

 

Monday, April 10

Boys baseball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights

Girls softball

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville – DH

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights – DH

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action each week in April, and any changes to the WKTV feature game schedule, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

Meijer Gardens expansion includes expanded learning center, local community education opportunities

Architectural drawings for Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park’s new Covenant Learning Center, which will be topped by the new Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

The multi-phased building expansion plans of the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park announced last week will include an expansion the institution’s learning center, already a favorite of several Wyoming and Kentwood community organizations including Kentwood Public Schools A.R.C.H. after school program.

 

The expansion plans include a new 60,000 square foot welcome center, a new transportation center, expansion and upgrades to the concert amphitheater, a new sculpture garden entry plaza and a “reimagined” scenic indoor corridor, and expanded parking and urban garden areas. Overall, project construction is scheduled to begin this fall and continue for approximately four years.

 

After the new welcome center, however, and most important expansion may be the 20,000 square foot Covenant Learning Center, which will be topped by the new Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.

 

Architectural drawings for Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park’s new Covenant Learning Center, which will be topped by the new Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.

“Today we have two approximately 1,100 square foot classrooms devoted to education,” Meijer Gardens President and CEO David Hooker said when asked by WKTV about the Covenant Learning Center. “Since 1999, our educational programming has grown 305 percent. While our education programming has grown … our space dedicated to education has remained the same. The new Covenant Learning Center will have four approximately 1,200 square foot classrooms, two 1,600 square foot classrooms and one 2,200 square foot Interactive Education Area. The opportunity for additional educational programming is nearly unlimited.”

 

Wyoming and Kentwood programs at the gardens

 

Kentwood’s A.R.C.H. after school program is just one of the many programs currently using the Garden’s educational programing.

 

“The after-school programs from both Kentwood (A.R.C.H.) and Wyoming (T.E.A.M. 21), in particular, have made frequent visits to Meijer Gardens in the past,” said Jessica Hart, Meijer Gardens indoor education manager. “We’re delighted that these groups have been able to enjoy our seasonal exhibitions, Sculpture Park, and Children’s Garden. I expect that the new Covenant Learning Center will allow us additional opportunities to offer educational programs school groups and after-school groups alike in the future.”

 

A.R.C.H. is a collaboration between Kentwood Public Schools and the Kentwood Parks and Recreation Department. Program activities focus on academics, health, wellness, and recreation/leisure education.  These activities will be offered to children, family, and community members throughout the year.

 

But the Kentwood program is just one of many groups availing themselves of local cultural educational opportunities. And that is just the way Meijer Garden’s wants it.

 

Following recent educational additions to other Grand Rapids area institutions, including The Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum, Meijer Garden’s Covenant Learning Center “will engage learners in new ways and reinforce our commitment as the go-to place for cultural education,” according to supplied information.

 

Part of Meijer Garden’s mission

 

“Since our beginning, education has been a hallmark of the Meijer Gardens mission — reaching more than 89,000 guests last year alone. In fact, the action word in our mission statement is ‘promote.’ Education is the primary method by which we put life into the word ‘promote.’ The dramatic growth of participation in our educational programming not only underscores the quality and diversity of our classes, camps and events, but also demonstrates a need for more classroom space.”

 

A key aspect of the new classrooms will be that they will provide outdoor learning areas, with five of the six having direct access from within the classroom. The outdoor learning area will be located east of the building and will include seating areas for students, teaching areas for instructors, and partial shade/cover from the elements.

 

The expansion plans are the result of a nearly complete $115 million capital campaign titled “Welcoming the World: Honoring a Legacy of Love”. The campaign currently has raised about $102 million of its goal, according to supplied information.

 

“If we are successful in our ‘Welcoming the World: Honoring a Legacy of Love’ fundraising efforts, we will begin construction in September of this year,” Hooker said. “We do not have a precise date at this time for the completion of the Covenant Learning Center or the Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden.”

 

The New York firm Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects Partners has been chosen “to re-envision and expand” the Meijer Gardens facilities, according to supplied information. The firm is known for their design of the iconic Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia and, most recently, chosen to design the Barack Obama Presidential Center in Chicago.

 

For more information about Meijer Gardens visit meijergardens.org. For more information about the “Welcoming the World: Honoring a Legacy of Love” fundraising efforts visit meijergardens.org/legacyoflove .

 

Philosopher to discuss anger in politics at April 4 Hauenstein Center event

Barbara C. Nussbaum

By Nate Hoekstra, GVSU

 

Does getting mad about politics work?

 

Politics in the United States today is an exceptionally divisive topic, and has generated significant anger among many political circles — an emotional response that influential philosopher Martha Nussbaum will argue isn’t the best way to generate change.

 

Nussbaum, a world-renowned philosopher, author and law professor, will discuss anger and its place in politics and personal lives, while addressing its effectiveness as a change agent. Martha Nussbaum: Anger and Revolutionary Justice will be hosted by Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies on Tuesday, April 4 at 7 pm at the L.V. Eberhard Center, Grand Valley State University’s Pew Grand Rapids Campus.

 

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is requested at hauensteincenter.org/rsvp.

 

Nussbaum, recently named the 2017 Jefferson Lecturer in the Humanities by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will discuss the concept that anger is not an effective response to perceived injustice, noting that three of recent history’s great freedom movements were directed by leaders who aspired to non-anger, including Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Nelson Mandela.

 

She will discuss her book Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice and explore why there will always be a need for leaders who can recognize the humanity of people who think differently when the stakes are high.

 

Nussbaum’s Jefferson Lecturer distinction is the highest honor the federal government bestows for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities. She is also the University of Chicago’s Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics. In 2016, she was awarded the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy. Other awards include The Centennial Medal of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, and the American Philosophical Association’s Philip Quinn Prize.

 

She is one of only two women to give the John Locke Lectures at Oxford, the most eminent lecture series in the field of philosophy.

 

Nussbaum has taught at Harvard, Brown University and Oxford, and has published 24 books and more than 500 academic papers.

 

For more information, visit hauensteincenter.org

Public Museum puts out call for annual Maker Faire

By Kate Moore, Grand Rapids Public Museum

 

If you enjoy tinkering, designing, building and hacking new technology-based inventions, then Maker Faire is for you. This year’s Maker Faire will be held at the Grand Rapids Public Museum (GRPM) and nearby Grand Valley State University’s Kennedy Hall of Engineering on August 19 and 20.

 

Part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new, Maker Faire is an all-ages gathering. All of these “makers” come to Maker Faire to show what they have made and to share what they have learned.

 

Featuring both established and emerging local “makers”, this family-friendly celebration features tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, hobbyists, engineers, artists, students and commercial exhibitors. Visitors will see installations from local West Michigan inventors, innovators and tinkerers, as well as makers traveling greater distances to showcase.

 

The Faire will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, August 19 and from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, August 20. Tickets will go on sale in early summer for Museum members and the general public.

 

Any groups or individuals interested in participating in the Maker Faire should complete the application at GrandRapids.MakerFaire.com. Spots are first come, first serve basis with openings inside both the GRPM and GVSU as well as outside on the GRPM’s lawn. This year’s Maker Faire expects to see more than 7,000 visitors throughout the two-day event.

 

The Call to Makers will close on July 16.

Game on: WKTV’s featured game for Friday, March 10

WKTV’s high school sports coverage crew was at Monday night’s tipoff of the opening round of the MHSAA district tournament at Godwin Heights. We will be there for the finals Friday. (WKTV)

WKTV Staff

 

This week WKTV’s featured Friday night high school sports event will be the finals of the boys MHSAA Basketball Basketball District 50 tournament at Wyoming Godwin Heights.

 

In Monday opening-round games, tournament host Godwin Heights had an easy time in a 80-32 win over West Michigan Aviation Academy, and (in WKTV’s covered feature game) Wyoming Kellogsville scored a 87-49 win over Kentwood’s Grand River Prep.

 

Tonight (Thursday, March 9) games will find Kellogsville (now 18-3) trying to avoid the upset by Wyoming-Lee (10-10) in the 6 p.m. game. Then Godwin Heights (20-1) will face off with Grand Rapids South Christian (10-10) at 8 p.m.

 

The winners of those games will play Friday, with WKTV cameras on hand, for the District title and a berth in the Region 11 Regional Tournament next week.

 

Th game will be aired that night on Live Wire 24 at 10:30 p.m. and repeat Saturday at 11 a.m. on WKTV 25 and AT&T U-verse 99.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action in January, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

DVDs and Blue-Rays of each game are also available for purchase at $20 including shipping. For more information, visit WKTV.org

 

Game on: WKTV’s featured games for March 6-10

The WKTV Mobile Unit will be out covering local high school basketball playoffs this week. (WKTV)

WKTV Staff

 

This week in WKTV’s featured high school sport games will be determined by which local teams are advancing in the basketball tournaments, but the coverage crew will be at  Godwin Heights Monday, March 6, for the boys basketball game between Grand River Prep vs Kelloggsville at Godwin Heights. The late week game will be determined later this week, tentatively on Friday, and will be announced.

 

WKTV videos and broadcasts several games each week during high school sports season.

 

The early week game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood. The late week game will be aired that night on Live Wire 24 at 10:30 p.m. and repeat Saturday at 11 a.m. on WKTV 25 and AT&T U-verse 99.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action in January, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

DVDs and Blue-Rays of each game are also available for purchase at $20 including shipping. For more information, visit WKTV.org

 

Local high school sports schedule: March 6-13

The high school hockey playoffs are in full swing this week.

Looking for a Wyoming and Kentwood area high school varsity sports event to get out to? Here is your weekly list.

 

Monday, March 6

Boys Basketball

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – Grand River Prep vs Kelloggsville

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – Godwin Heights vs South Christian

MHSAA State Districts @ Zeeland East – Wyoming @ Zeeland East

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – TBD

MHSAA State Districts @ Ottawa Hills – TBD

 

Tuesday, March 7

Girls Basketball

MHSAA State Regionals @ Zeeland East – TBD

 

Wednesday, March 8

Boys Basketball

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – TBD vs Wyoming Lee

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – Holland Calvary vs Zion Christian

MHSAA State Districts @ Ottawa Hills – East Kentwood vs Ottawa Hills

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – Tri-Unity Christian vs Potter’s  House

 

Thursday, March 9

Girls Basketball

MHSAA State Regionals @ Zeeland East – TBD

 

Friday, March 10

Girls Gymnastics

MHSAA State Team Finals – @ Plymouth-Canton

Boys Hockey

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 1 @ Plymouth 5:00 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 1 @ Plymouth 7:30 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 2 @ Plymouth 5:00 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 2 @ Plymouth 7:30 PM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 3 @ Plymouth 11:00 AM

MHSAA State Semifinals – Division 3 @ Plymouth 1:30 PM

Boys Swimming

MHSAA State Finals – Division 1 @ Oakland University

MHSAA State Finals – Division 2 @ Eastern Michigan University

MHSAA State Finals – Division 3 @ Holland Aquatic Center

Boys Basketball

MHSAA State Districts @ Godwin Heights – TBD

MHSAA State Districts @ Ottawa Hills – TBD

MHSAA State Districts @ Zion Christian – TBD

 

Saturday, March 11

Girls Gymnastics

MHSAA State Individual Finals – @ Plymouth-Canton

Boys Hockey

MHSAA State Finals – Division 1 @ Plymouth – 6:00 PM

MHSAA State Finals – Division 2 @ Plymouth – 10:00 AM

MHSAA State Finals – Division 3 @ Plymouth – 2:00 PM

Boys Swimming

MHSAA State Finals – Division 2 @ Eastern Michigan University

MHSAA State Finals – Division 3 @ Holland Aquatic Center

 

No scheduled local team events March 13-16

Running with the Wolves; Wyoming high inducts five into its athletic Hall of Fame

Wyoming High School inducted five student athletes, some from Rogers and some from Wyoming Park high schools, into its athletic Hall of Fame. (WKTV)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

When cross-town athletic rivals Wyoming Park and Rogers high schools combined to form the current Wyoming High School, two athletic traditions were combined and a new one was born.

 

That shared past and unified present was honored early this month as five one-time students athletes were inducted into the Wyoming High School athletic Hall of Fame.

 

The ceremony was held Feb. 10, between home boys and girls basketball games. Those inducted included Andy Vavere, Laura Erdmans Readle, Doug Chappell, Kim Blouw Norden and Eric Taylor.

 

For many of the inductees, it was not only night to be honored but to remember high school athletic careers and experiences still remembered fondly — including one where cross-town athletic competition led to a union of a different kind.

 

Andy Vavere, Rogers High Class of 1980, was not only a standout football, basketball and baseball athlete — highlighted by the basketball team’s deep runs into the state tournament in 1979 and 1980 — but he also met his future wife during his high school years.

 

Andy Vavere (WKTV)

“My favorite (athletic) memories were our tournament runs we had in 1979 and 1980. We were regional finalists in ’79 and semifinalists in ’80,” Vavere said. Rogers was 21-4 the first year and 21-5 the second.

 

During those years, Vavere was an OK Red all-conference baseball player in 1979, an all-conference quarterback in 1980, and a all-conference basketball player in both years. He was also the 1980 Adrian Allen Athlete of the Year Award winner.

 

But the longest lasting memory was meeting his wife, Margaret, who attended his school’s arch rival.

 

“I was a senior at Rogers High School in 1980 and she was at Wyoming Park, a competitive school, and we met through competition,” he said. “I started dating Margaret in 1979 and we got married in 1989.”

 

And, Vavere admitted, it was always a challenge to face Wyoming Park on the field: “Absolutely, those guys were great,” he said.

 

Running into the Hall of Fame

 

One of those “great” Wyoming Park athletes was cross country and track runner Kim Blouw, Class of 1990.

 

Blouw, who later graduated from Central Michigan University, was track all-state each of her four years of high school, and was an all-state cross country runner her junior and senior years. She held school records in the 800, 1,600, 3,200-meter runs as well as in the 2-mile relay run. And she was part of a state champion 2-mile relay team one year.

 

But, maybe, the highlife of her high school career was spring track practice after a 16-hour bus ride to Myrtle Beach, S.C.

 

Kim Blouw Norden (WKTV)

“I guess my favorite memories about high school would be my two coaches, Mr. (Frank) Grimm and Mr. (Dick) Locke, and traveling to South Carolina to go to Myrtle Beach, becoming a team, but not only a team but becoming a family,” Blouw said.

 

She also credits her family, both at home and on the Wyoming Park athletic teams, for keeping her focused and successful in her high school years.

 

“What made me do that was that I had two great parents who instilled a really good value system in us, myself and my brother,” she said. “I had really great coaches that really emphasized the importance of never giving up. I had a goal, and my goal was to go to college. And I was blessed with the ability to run. … So many people believed in me, encouraged me to excel in my career as a track and cross country runner. I embraced that.”

 

Three more honored with induction

 

Eric Taylor, Wyoming Park Class of 1988, had a basketball career that not only brought success to his high school, but to his college and professional teams as a player, and then carried him back nearly to full-circle as a high school basketball coach.

 

Taylor was an all-conference and all-state player his last two years at Wyoming Park, then  played basketball and earned a degree at Oakland University. He went on to play professionally in Europe, winning multiple championships, and earn his masters degree from Grand Valley State University. He now coaches varsity basketball at Grand Rapids Christian High School.

 

“My passion is giving back to students and to influence their lives in a positive way everyday,” Taylor said in supplied material. “It’s about the legacy to reach, teach, love and support all students and be an example and a role everyday for all students.”

 

Doug Chappel, Rogers Class of 1979, died in 2012 but left a mark on the basketball record books both at his high school and at University of Detroit. He was a multi-sport athlete but starred on the basketball court in high school — including being all-conference three years, all state two years including being one of the top five players in the state his senior year, and scoring 1,300 points while grabbing more than 700 rebounds. He then played four years of college ball at Detroit, scoring nearly 1,200 points and gaining all-league honors.

 

Laura Readle, Wyoming Park Class of 1981, was a multi-sport athlete, including all-conference honors multiple years in volleyball, basketball and track. She was a rebounding machine on the basketball court, averaging 29 rebounds a game one year, and a record-braking sprinter on the track. She went on to gain her bachelors and masters degrees from Aquinas College, coached AAU basketball for 10 years and is now the track coach at Tri-County High School.

 

She also still runs, and runs and runs — including finishing marathons, ½ marathons, triathlons and the 25K River Bank run spread out over 30 years, and recently participated in a 5-hour adventure race. And the track for Wyoming Park, at Godwin High School, is still one of her favorite memories.

 

She remembers “when the only track that was ‘rubberized’ not cinder, in the late ’70s, at Godwin High School … every track meet all 8 schools in our conference would be there,” Readle said in supplied material. “I met many wonderful friends from all the other schools in our conference and I am still friends with many of them today. It is also where I met my husband. Many, many happy memories!”

 

Game on: WKTV’s featured games for Feb. 20-25

Hockey at East Kentwood High School is on tap for Saturday coverage by the WKTV crew.

WKTV Staff

 

This week in WKTV’s featured high school sport games, the coverage crew will be at East Kentwood for girls basketball game against Hudsonville on Tuesday, Feb. 21, and then at East Kentwood for a hockey game against Forest Hills Central on Saturday, Feb. 25.

 

WKTV videos and broadcasts several games each week during high school sports season.

 

Each Tuesday game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood. Every Friday game will be aired that night on Live Wire 24 at 10:30 p.m. and repeat Saturday at 11 a.m. on WKTV 25 and AT&T U-verse 99.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action in January, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

DVDs and Blue-Rays of each game are also available for purchase at $20 including shipping. For more information, visit WKTV.org

 

Game on: WKTV’s featured games for Feb. 14-17

This week’s WKTV featured sports coverage includes basketball.

WKTV Staff

 

This week in WKTV’s featured high school sport games, the coverage crew will be at Wyoming Lee for boys basketball game against Kelloggsville on Tuesday, Feb. 14, and then at East Kentwood for a hockey game against Grandville on Friday, Feb. 17.

 

WKTV videos and broadcasts several games each week during high school sports season.

 

Each Tuesday game will be broadcast that night on Live Wire Comcast Channel 24 at 10:30 p.m. throughout the Grand Rapids Metro Area and repeat on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. on  WKTV Comcast Channel 25 and AT&T U-verse Channel 99 in Wyoming & Kentwood. Every Friday game will be aired that night on Live Wire 24 at 10:30 p.m. and repeat Saturday at 11 a.m. on WKTV 25 and AT&T U-verse 99.

 

For a complete schedule of all local high school sports action in January, see now.wktv.org/sports/

 

DVDs and Blue-Rays of each game are also available for purchase at $20 including shipping. For more information, visit WKTV.org

 

Government Matters: Opposing views on DeVos confirmation

News of Your Government

WKTV Staff

 

Following the U.S. Senate confirmation of West Michigan’s Betsy DeVos as President Donald Trump’s choice for Secretary of Education, local U.S. Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-MI) and U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) had very different responses.

 

Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-MI)

Rep. Huizenga, in a Wednesday, Feb. 8, post on his Facebook account, said: “Congratulations to West Michigan’s own Betsy DeVos on being confirmed by the Senate as the next Secretary of Education. Betsy will work tirelessly and fight to ensure that every child in America, no matter their zip code, has access to a quality education.”

 

Sen. Stabenow was not quite so congratulatory.

 

Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)

In a Feb. 8 supplied statement, Sen. Stabenow said: “I am deeply disappointed that Senate Republicans confirmed Betsy DeVos to lead the Department of Education. I’ve heard from an overwhelming number of Michigan families who have shared their strong concerns about her long record of pushing policies that have seriously undermined public education in Michigan and failed our children. That is why I joined with half of my Senate colleagues, including two Republicans, to oppose her nomination.”

 

Sen. Peters comments on President’s nomination for Supreme Court

 

U.S. Senator Gary Peters (D -MI), on Feb. 1, issued the following statement on President Donald Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch, who currently serves on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States:

 

U.S. Sen. Gary Peters (D-MI)

“Just as President Obama did, President Trump has a constitutional responsibility to nominate Justices to fill vacancies on the Supreme Court, and the U.S. Senate has a constitutional responsibility to consider those nominees. For 293 days, Senate Republicans failed to fulfill that duty by denying President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland, the same thorough and public consideration process that they are now urging for President Trump’s nominee.

 

“I take very seriously the Senate’s responsibility to advise and consent on all nominees, and every individual who could be serving on our nation’s highest court deserves to be fully vetted. As President Trump’s nominee moves through the judicial hearing process, I will be carefully reviewing his qualifications to serve on the Supreme Court, which is a pillar of American democracy.”

 

Sen. Peters introduces Legislation Helps Protect Domestic Violence Victims and Their Pets

 

U.S. Senators Gary Peters (D-MI), along with Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV), on Feb. 8, reintroduced the Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act, legislation to protect victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and dating violence from emotional and psychological trauma caused by violence against their pets.

 

Multiple studies have shown that domestic abusers often seek to manipulate or intimidate their victims by threatening or harming their pets, but according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), only three percent of domestic violence shelters across the country accept pets. Similar legislation is being introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

 

“Abusers often exploit the emotional attachment victims have with their pets, leaving victims of domestic violence stuck choosing between their own safety or leaving a beloved pet in harm’s way,” Sen. Peters said in supplied material. “I’m proud to join my colleagues in introducing this bipartisan legislation that will help empower victims to leave abusive situations, get a fresh start and keep their pets who are treasured members of their families.”

 

Godfrey-Lee schools induct new members into Hall of Fame

Godfrey-Lee Public Schools inducted six new members into their Hall of Fame prior to a boys basketball game on Jan. 20 at Lee High School. (WKTV)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

Godfrey-Lee Public Schools inducted six new members into its Hall of Fame late last month, and while the most Rebel-rousing acceptance speech was given by — no surprise — long-time football coach and educator Thomas DeGennaro, the district’s hall of fame is for more than only athletic personalities.

 

The induction ceremony, which took place prior to a boys basketball game on Jan. 20 at Lee High School, also included a war hero, a university professor, a long-time school board member, a school band leader and a woman who gave back to the school system almost up to her last day.

 

Football coach and educator Thomas DeGennaro. (WKTV)

DeGennaro — who has served as teacher, principal and now, again, varsity football coach — was the final of the inductees to speak, and he spoke clearly about what it means to be a Lee High Rebel.

 

“I have been grateful to work with some of the toughest kids in the United States,” DeGennaro said. “To be a Rebel means you are willing to stand up against the establishment. You have to be willing to put yourself on the line when you stand up. Our kids here do this every day.

 

“They overcome obstacles that would unimaginable to surrounding districts. Many of our students are immigrants, or children of immigrants, much like my grandparents … These students overcome language, cultural and other challenges that stall most students learning process. Not only do they overcome these obstacles, they excel. … The establishment loves to keep these kids down, but they rebel. They are Rebels.”

 

DeGennaro’s history in the district includes taking a position on the Lee High faculty in 2002, teaching U.S. History and Geography as well as a variety of other elective social studies courses. But it is on the football field where he did most of his teaching. In 1998, he took over the Rebel football program and coached the first Lee football team ever to make it into the MHSAA playoffs, when his team went 8-2 in the fall of 2006. After an eight-year absence from the sidelines at Lee Field, he returned this past fall and has begun the process of rebuilding a program that has not experience much success since his last season in 2007.

 

Starting in 2007, the Rebel Hall of Fame selection committee, comprised of members of the Board of Education, district administration, faculty, alumni and the Godfrey-Lee community has selected alumni, staff and other individuals associated with Godfrey-Lee Public Schools in recognition of their achievements and contributions.

 

The six new members joined forty-two other individuals and one athletic team in the Hall of Fame. David Britten, superintendent of Godfrey-Lee School District, was master of ceremonies of the event.

 

This year’s inductees also included Staff Sgt. Daniel Hayes, Lee High School class of 2004; Dr. Carl J. Bajema, class of 1955; Dennis E. Groendyke, class of 1979 and Board of Education member from 1999 to 2016; Christine Vettese, district SIG Coordinator for 2010 to 2013; and Robert Hill, high school band director from 1967 to 1981.

 

Douglas Greenwold, class of 1960, was also selected but requested to delay participation in the induction ceremony until 2018.

 

Personal stories of dedication

 

Staff Sgt. Hayes is a veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan military operations where, with the 101st Airborne Division, he earned the Purple Heart for injuries sustained in combat in Iraq in 2006. He was later personally awarded the Silver Star, the third highest decoration for valor for gallant actions and devotion to duty, while serving in Afghanistan in 2010. In 2011, he sustained another injury and earned a second Purple Heart. His award was accepted by his aunt.

 

Dr. Carl J. Bajema, with his wife, Claudia.

Dr. Bajema, after graduating from Lee, earned his Ph.D. in zoology from Michigan State University and retired from Grand Valley State University with the designation of Professor Emeritus in 2007 following a forty-three year teaching and scientific research career. He was also the recipient of the 2009 Distinguished Volunteer Service Award from the Historical Society of Michigan.

 

And his wife, reading from a statement and speaking for him due to a medical condition that hampers his ability to speak clearly, revealed a little of Dr. Bajema’s own history.

 

“When I learned I was to receive this Rebel award, I dug into my archives for my report cards, I actually had all my report cards,” Claudia Bajema said, as Carl waved an old report card for the audience to see. “Well, I can assure you that anyone viewing those would not conclude that I would be given one of these prestigious awards.

 

“I left my mark on the high school in an unconventional way. For several years following my graduation … my lab mate and me were given as an example of how not to do experiments. … we were in a hurry and failed to read all the instructions on how to conduct an experiment … (and) a chemical reaction caused an explosion, a volcano of sorts, leaving a very nasty stain on the ceiling.”

 

Dennis E. Groendyke

Groendyke, Board of Education member from 1999 to 2016, is a lifelong resident of the district who chose to raise his own family of seven children here and watch them attend Godfrey-Lee schools, according to supplied material. He concluded his service this winter following 17 years, including four-and-one-half years leading the board as president. A strong supporter of athletics, he has provided many hours of volunteer coaching for baseball and softball, including weekend clinics for youth during the school year.

 

“I love this district, I love the people in it, most of all I love the children,” Groendyke said. “My heart will always be here.”

 

Robert Hill

Hill was Lee High band director from 1967 to 1981, where he yearly took a “sometimes unruly” group of teen musicians unifying them into well organized marching and concert bands, according to supplied material. A visible teacher and mentor, he could be seen leading his bands at every home football and basketball game, believing that the band was central to inspiring young athletes and building school pride. His musical talents also carried him to perform with the Grand Valley State University faculty orchestra.

 

“This high school has, and always will, have a very special place in my heart,” Hill said. “I will always remember the joy of teaching students.”

 

Roberta Burke, sister of Christine Vettese.

Vettese was district SIG coordinator from 2010-13. She died in 2015. When Lee High School needed help with academic improvement to get off a state list of low-performing schools, she came out of retirement from East Grand Rapids schools and applied her many leadership, curriculum, and personal relationship skills to serve as a principle leader in that effort, according to supplied material. Through her advocacy, guidance and dogged persistence, she helped secure grants in excess of $3.5 million dollars over the three years to support the work of teachers, administrators, and students.

 

Her sister, Roberta Burke, accepted the award.

 

“I know if she were here today, she would say … its all about the students, and how to get them to be the best they can be,” Burke said, pointing to the heavens. “I know she is looking down right now and saying ‘bravo’ ” for what the district has accomplished.

 

Vietnamese student gains experiences, court time, at Wyoming school

Riley Nguyen, a 17-year-old exchange student from Vietnam, with West Michigan Lutheran girls basketball coach Aaron Cochrill. (WKTV)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

West Michigan Lutheran, a very small high school in Wyoming, had five players available for its girls basketball team this season — what you call a really thin bench. But that was before an unlikely import from Southeast Asia joined girls basketball Coach Aaron Cochrill’s team.

 

For Riley Nguyen, a 17-year-old exchange student from Vietnam, playing on the team was just another way for her to fit in at her school and with her West Michigan host family — Darian Blanchard, the junior co-captain of the team, is her “home sister” in America.

 

For Cochrill, getting Riley to join was part being a basketball coach and part just being a teacher and mentor to students.

 

“What Riley brings to our team, first, is a bench — she is the sixth player,” Cochrill said. “But she is so intelligent, and she has a willingness, a ‘Whatever you want me to do coach, I’ll do it.’ So, against Aviation Academy, one of our starting point guards got in foul trouble early and we needed big minutes of her. I just said ‘Riley, it is your turn. Get in there.’ That is what she does, I ask her do something and she does it.”

 

Thing is, though, Riley really does not play basketball much back in Viet Nam, let along play at the level of American players, even at a small high school.

 

“I really like basketball, but I am a newbie,” she said. “So its takes a while to catch up with them. They are really good. The challenge is the skills I have to learn. That’s a lot. But the thing I enjoy the most is when I am out on the basketball court. I just go for it. Just do it.”

 

Riley Nguyen, left, with the rest of her West Michigan Lutheran girls basketball, getting some coaching from coach Aaron Cochrill. (WKTV)

Just going for it is also an apt way to describe what brought Riley to Western Michigan.

 

She is in America as part of the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP). Her real home is Tan An City, outskirts of Ho Chi Minh City, with a four-member family including a father who works as an account/auditor. This is her family’s first experience in America.

 

Riley Nguyen

“I enjoy the new experiences here, the food, the people here,” she said. “I get to know so many people. There lifestyles is not like ours. I also (get to) know so many things about their cultures, too. I really enjoyed Christmas break here. You have Christmas break and spring break and summer break — actually, I think there are a lot of breaks here. … But I like it.”

 

There were also some challenges off the basketball court. “Sometimes I miss the food in my country. I am so used to Vietnamese food that, sometimes, I have belly ache. … But that is a minor problem.”

 

Her new “home sister” has been helping her, though, on and off the court. And they have developed quite a friendship, both say.

 

“I told Riley it is kind of like having a sleepover with your best friend everyday and I really enjoy it,” Darian said. “We really connected. Even before she came here, we were Skyping back and forth, and we found we had a lot in common, a lot of interests together.

 

Darian Blanchard

“Back home, Riley had a dance group that she was in, so we play games on the Wii, like ‘Just Dance’, a lot. … One of the fun parts about this is showing her everything. A different perspective, a different life. It has been really fun to see her go ‘This is so cool.’ … the look on her face when she sees food that is new, the look on her face is ‘Oh, my God. I cannot believe I have lived without this.’”

 

And then there is that Michigan State connection.

 

“I was so surprised, the first time I came here, and I talked to them,” Riley said. “ My dream college is Michigan State, and they are big fans of Michigan State. I was like ‘Ohhh. Yep, we were meant to be.’ We get along really well. They care about me a lot, little things like food, my sleep and stuff like that. Darian, my home sister, she takes care of me.”

 

And the relationship might not end with the end of this school year. Riley has applied for acceptance at Michigan State and should hear before the end of this school year.

 

Her American basketball career most assuredly ends with coming off the bench for the Mustangs, however. But coach Cochrill’s favorite story about Riley does show she has at least a little game.

 

“Our first game. She got fouled. She got to go to the line,” he said. “She made a free throw and she turns around and looks at me, a kind of look that says ‘Is that for real? Did that just happen?’ She kind of gets this grin on her face. … That is her personality to a tee.”

 

Locally-produced sewing craft show back for 2nd season on WKTV

OnPoint focuses on host Nancy M. Roelfsema’s “Learning to Quilt” lessons. (Supplied)

By Thomas Hegewald

 

 

When OnPoint Tutorials, Tips & Tours debuted in 2015, the production team had no idea what the audience reaction would be to the show. While the team pledged to focus on all things creative, they didn’t know they would create a following which would look forward to a new tutorial, tip or tour every week.

 

From the start they have endeavored to demonstrate host lessons to a broader audience. By showcasing these lessons, the show has created a large “classroom” for viewers and novice quilters alike. OnPoint will complete these lessons in the course of the second season along with showcasing other crafts.

 

The OnPoint production team includes team Bill Roelfsema, Gina Greenlee, Karen Giles, Nancy Roelfsema, Athina Morehouse, Michelle Sheler, Eric Sheler, and Thomas Hegewald.

 

The OnPoint production team includes team, from left to right, Bill Roelfsema, Gina Greenlee, Karen Giles, Nancy Roelfsema, Athina Morehouse, Michelle Sheler, Eric Sheler and Thomas Hegewald. (Supplied)

Each month the production team records a number of segments for a half hour program. In addition to providing viewers with step-by-step tutorials on a particular technique, they also feature helpful tips and an insider’s view of local trade shows, quilt stores, quilt guilds and artist’s studios.

 

For this, the second season, they’ve produced additional episodes featuring demonstrations that were recorded in October at the 2016 Quilts on the Grand Show held at the DeltaPlex.

 

Season 2 of OnPoint Tutorials, Tips & Tours debuted last week on WKTV and will continue weekly with initial broadcasts on Monday at 6 p.m., with an encore broadcast on Friday at 10:30 a.m.

 

For more information on OnPoint, visit onpoint-tv.com or on FaceBook at OnPoint.

 

Local high school sports schedule: Jan. 23-30

Looking for a Wyoming and Kentwood area high school varsity sports event to get out to? Here is your weekly list.

 

Monday, Jan. 23, 2017

Girls Basketball

Grand Rapids Thunder @ West Michigan Lutheran

Boys/Girls Bowling

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights

Kelloggsville @ Hopkins

South Christian @ Wayland

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville

Girls Gymnastics

East Kentwood @ Lowell

 

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017

Girls Basketball

Covert @ Zion Christian

Christian @ Wyoming

Hopkins @ Kelloggsville

East Kentwood @ Hudsonville

Holland Calvary @ Tri-Unity Christian

Boys Basketball

Covert @ Zion Christian

Wyoming @ Christian

Wyoming Lee @ Godwin Heights

Kelloggsville @ Hopkins

Covenant Christian @ South Christian

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

Fennville @ Tri-Unity Christian

Girls Cheer

@ East Kentwood

 

Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017

Girls Basketball 

WMAI @ Grand River Prep

Boys Basketball

WMAI @ Grand River Prep

Boys/Girls Bowling

Wayland @ Wyoming

Wyoming Lee @ NorthPointe Christian

Godwin Heights @ Calvin Christian

Kelloggsville @ Kent City

Middleville T-K @ South Christian

Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

Girls Cheer

Wyoming @ Middleville T-K

Wyoming Lee @ Hopkins

Godwin Heights @ Hopkins

Kelloggsville @ Hopkins

Boys Wrestling

Wyoming @ Zeeland West

Wyoming Lee @ Comstock Park

NorthPointe Christian @ Godwin Heights

Belding @ Kelloggsville

Grand Haven @ East Kentwood

Girls Gymnastics

FH Central @ East Kentwood

 

Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017

Boys Basketball

Hudsonville Hornets @ West Michigan Aviation

Girls Basketball

West Michigan Aviation @ Tri-Unity Christian

Boys Swimming

South Christian @ Middleville T-K

Hudsonville @ East Kentwood

 

Friday, Jan. 27, 2017

Girls Basketball

Zion Christian @ Grand River Prep

Wyoming @ Hudsonville

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Christian

Kelloggsville @ Belding

Middleville T-K @ South Christian

Rockford @ East Kentwood

Boys Basketball

Zion Christian @ Grand River Prep

Wellspring Prep @ Potter’s House

Wyoming @ Hudsonville

Wyoming Lee @ Hopkins

Godwin Heights @ NorthPointe Christian

Kelloggsville @ Belding

Middleville T-K @ South Christian

Rockford @ East Kentwood

Ellington Academy @ Tri-Unity Christian

 

Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017

Boys/Girls Bowling

Wyoming @ Rockford

Godwin Heights @ Rockford

Wyoming Lee @ East Kentwood

Kelloggsville @ East Kentwood

South Christian @ Rockford

Boys Wrestling

Wyoming @ Montague

Wyoming Lee @ Reed City

Godwin Heights @ Okemos

East Kentwood @ Lakewood

Girls Cheer

Wyoming @ East Kentwood – LMCCOA

Kelloggsville @ East Kentwood – LMCCOA

Boys Swimming

South Christian @ Hudsonville

Girls Dance

East Kentwood @ Jenison

Girls Gymnastics

East Kentwood @ Kenowa Hills

 

Monday, Jan. 30, 2017

Boys/Girls Bowling

Potter’s House @ Christian

South Christian @ Christian

Wyoming @ FH Eastern

Kelloggsville @ Wyoming Lee

Godwin Heights @ Hopkins

Caledonia @ East Kentwood

Girls Basketball

Hudsonville Hornets @ West Michigan Lutheran

Kelloggsville @ Martin

Girls Cheer

Godwin Heights @ Hastings

Girls Gymnastics

East Kentwood @ Kenowa Hills

 

Registration for Science Night at Grand Rapids Public Museum now open

The Grand Rapids Public Museum. (Supplied)

WKTV Staff

 

The Grand Rapids Public Museum (GRPM), recently announced that registration is open to host a science booth at this year’s Science Night at the Museum, taking place on Tuesday, April 18.

 

GRPM is inviting local and regional researchers, students and faculty to host a hands-on table display related to their research or field of study, according to supplied material  the event will be  from 5 to 8 p.m. The vision is to have lab groups or individuals putting together innovative ways to engage the public and communicate their research to the community.

 

A cash award will be given for the most innovative and hands-on interpretation of their research. One winner will be chosen by public vote and a second chosen by the Museum’s education staff.

 

Applications are open through Feb. 10 and can be found at grpm.org/ScienceNight

 

Design thinking in health care will be explored during GVSU event

Ryan Armbruster

By Matthew Makowski

 

Health care providers continuously strive to meet the needs of those they serve, and the problem-solving process of design thinking is becoming an integral part of developing those solutions.

 

This idea will be explored during “Design Thinking in Health Care Services” at Grand Valley State University, presented by Ryan Armbruster, vice president of innovation, research and development at Optum, a UnitedHealth Group company.

 

“Design Thinking in Health Care Services” will take place Jan. 23, from 6-7 pm, in Loosemore Auditorium located in the DeVos Center on the Pew Grand Rapids Campus.

 

In his role at Optum, Armbruster leads a design group that is focused on designing health services that provide better value and experiences for people.

 

Prior to his position at Optum, Armbruster co-founded and served as chief experience officer of Harken Health, a health care organization designed to provide a caring environment to health care services and experiences. He also created enterprise-wide programs to improve innovation while serving as vice president of innovation at UnitedHealth Group, including creating and leading its Design Studio. In addition, he created and directed the SPARC Design Lab at Mayo Clinic, a center for innovation in health care services.

 

For the past decade, Armbruster has taught health care service design and innovation at the University of Minnesota, where he earned a master’s degree in health care administration.

 

For more information about this event, contact John Berry, director of Grand Valley’s Design Thinking Initiative, at berryjr@gvsu.edu.

Living a musical life; Kentwood man part of St. Cecilia community band 

John Weitzel, who lived in Kentwood for almost 30 years, has spent the last two years as part of St. Cecilia Music Center’s Grand Band. (WKTV)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

John Weitzel, who lived in Kentwood for almost 30 years, has been a musician for the majority of his 92 years — as a musical student, teacher and high school band leader. And he has no intention of stopping.

 

The St. Cecilia Grand Band in rehearsal at the music center’s Royce Auditorium. (WKTV)

So, with is baritone horn in hand, John has spent the last two years as part of St. Cecilia Music Center’s Grand Band, one of a series of community youth and adult music programs offered by the center.

 

“I was one of those people who started playing early in my life, I was eight years old when I first started playing the trumpet, became a member of the high school band a little early and had quite an experience there. Then I went to college and played trumpet there,” John said in a recent interview during a break in rehearsal with the band.

 

He has a masters degree in music from Columbia University in New York, still majoring in trumpet. Then became a high school band director in Alliance, Ohio, and was there for 35 years, as director of the band and supervisor of music. “After I retired from that, my wife and I moved to Grand Rapids and I joined up with several bands and have been in the (St. Cecilia) Grand Band for a couple years. It has been a great experience.”

 

His life has been full of great musical experiences, however. One of his fondest is his relationship with world-famous composer, conductor and arranger Henry Mancini.

 

Friends in music, life

 

“We met when we were in junior high school in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. We were both 12 years old. We hit it off right away because we were both only children,” John said. “He had quite a personality, even at that age, and I was attracted to him. We had quite an experience together, in high school, through our music. He was a life-long friend.”

 

Even when Mancini was at the top of his fame, and John a high school band director, they shared musical moments.

 

“He played a concert at Blossom Hills, Ohio, with the Cleveland Orchestra, and he was kind enough to introduce me during that concert,” John said. “Then we met after, in the Green Room, and we were able to renew our friendship at that point. … unfortunately, he passed away at just 70 years old. I was always curious about the music he might have written had he been allowed to live a little longer.”

 

And speaking of long life, John credits his continuing love of music as one reason for his longevity.

 

“I just feel that physically, and mentally, it is a great outlet,” he said. “I have been extremely happy, in my old age, playing in three different bands and I feel that the Grand Band is my favorite. … (it was) attractive to me for a lot of reasons: the atmosphere, the fact that we play on the same stage where world-class musicians perform, great directors. It is a fund band, and I have met a lot of friends.”

 

Weitzel’s attraction to the band is shared by other members, as is the feeling that it helps senior players keep or renew their musical skills.

 

Many members, many musical stories

 

Tom Ennis, a 70-year-old trumpet player, also started playing when he was eight and played through high school. But then life got in the way.

 

Tom Ennis is a trumpet player with the Grand Band. (WKTV)

“I joined the Army. Went over to Vietnam, and then got stationed in California and raised my family there. I kind of fell out of it,” Tom said. “When I retired from work, out in California, I wanted to play my horn again, but they don’t have community bands out there. When we moved back to Michigan, I found out about the Grand Band.

 

“For myself, I think you can continue to improve and improve, as you get older and older, you don’t have to just stagnate. … but, like anything, it is very hard if you just do it by yourself. You can’t play a trumpet by yourself and enjoy it a whole lot. The enjoyment comes with playing with a full band.”

 

Weitzel’s and Ennis’ stories are just two of the many stories of the St. Cecilia music programs, according to Grand Band director Paul Keen.

 

St. Cecilia Music Center Grand Band director Paul Keen. (WKTV)

“There is a wide variety of musical talents in this band,” Keen said. “It is not exclusively an elder band, we invite musicians of all ages. In fact, the young person … (in the band) is home schooled. He is the son of one of our percussionists, and we welcome him.”

 

But Keen, 70, sees special benefit to older musicians.

 

“It is an opportunity to continue to socialize with people with similar interests. There is also a benefit in terms of cognitive functioning,” her said. “If people, as they get older, stimulate their brains, whether it is through board games, through art, music, other intellectual pursuits, it really does help our frame of mind, our physical and mental wellbeing. I know from my own personal situation, all the aches and pains I feel, I never seem to feel them when I am playing an instrument or standing up here (leading the band).”

 

St. Cecilia Music Center. (WKTV)

The St. Cecilia Music Center’s Grand Band rehearses Monday mornings and performed in concert in December. The Grand String Orchestra, conducted by Cyndi Betts, rehearses on Wednesday evenings. No auditions are needed for either group. For more information about joining one of the adult ensembles visit SCMC-online.org or call the education director at 616-459-2224.

 

Banking on Parent Educators, Parents As Educators

PNC Grant Helps Fund More Outreach

Ivan and mom Careni Solis get their library cards
Ivan and mom Careni Solis get their library cards

by Erin Albanese   

School News Network

 

In a room designated for storytelling at the Wyoming branch of the Kent District Library, Ethel Rodriguez spoke in Spanish with Careni and Joel Solis about ways to best help their son, Ivan, 3, and daughter, Melanie, 5 months, stay on schedule developmentally.

 

The meeting involved the whole Solis family. Rodriguez, a Kent ISD Bright Beginnings parent educator, led activities that had Ivan clapping gleefully, Melanie smiling toothlessly, mom and dad beaming with pride, and sisters Paola, a sixth-grader, and Alondra, a fourth-grader, joining the fun.

 

Rodriguez has worked with the family since September. She focuses on helping Hispanic children, from infancy to kindergarten, and their parents. At the library, she taught Careni how to give Melanie a baby massage, beneficial for bonding and emotional development, she explained. She read the family a story, and led a game focused on large-motor skill development for Ivan that had everyone hopping like frogs and galloping like horses.She named colors with Ivan, “verde, green” and counted dinosaurs in a book with him, “uno, dos, tres, quatro, cinco, seis, siete.”

 

Bright Beginnings Parent Educators are trained and certified in the Parents As Teachers evidence- and research-based curriculum, which they use to help parents learn to teach their children at home. Services include home visits, playgroups, developmental screenings and a network of resources.

 

Reaching Out to Hispanic Families

Serving Spanish-speaking families often requires going the extra mile. Rodriguez, who is from Peru and is fluent in English and Spanish, is working with 19 Hispanic families from Godfrey-Lee and Godwin Heights Public Schools, districts with a high percentage of those students. She makes twice-monthly home visits and hosts special library sessions that end with family members getting their own library cards. Rodriguez’s salary is partially funded through a $10,000 Grow Up Great grant from PNC Bank.

 

Jan Sabin, parent educator coordinator for Bright Beginnings, said Rodriguez and other Spanish-speaking parent educators go above and beyond their job responsibilities. They translate for families, make phone calls and help with paperwork. “There are significant extra hours needed for serving families,” Sabin said.

 

Dad Joel Solis catches the baby’s attention
Dad Joel Solis catches the baby’s attention

There are many immigrant families like the Solises whose children are starting school in the U.S. According to the 2015 report Immigrant and Refugee Workers in the Early Childhood Field, by the Migration Policy Institute, “The growth of the U.S. 0-5 population is becoming increasingly diverse. Homes in the U.S. with children ages 5 and under who have at least one immigrant parent now account for all the net population growth of children in that age group in the U.S.”

 

Overall, Rodriguez’s work is helping the Solises and other Hispanic families have better access to what they need. “I think through programs like Bright Beginnings they can have the opportunity to access and accomplish their goal of why they came here,” she said. “They came here to have better opportunities.”

 

Stories, Questions and Books

Joel, who works at a packing company, and Careni, a stay-at-home mother, are emigrants from Guatemala. They said they see benefits of Bright Beginnings for their children. Melanie shows signs of crawling, Careni said, perhaps from increased time spent on her tummy. Ivan asks lots of questions, makes up stories about dinosaurs, has learned to hold a pencil correctly and loves to do the “homework” Rodriguez assigns, Joel said.

 

Melanie watches “Baby Faces” during her baby massage
Melanie watches “Baby Faces” during her baby massage

Rodriguez also puts books into children’s hands and homes. With their new library cards, the Solises can check out books whenever they want, a practice hoped to become a regular activity.”Since you have been coming to my house, I see Ivan is more interested in preschool. Now he wants to go to school,” Joel said to Rodriguez in Spanish. “He used to scribble; now he is more patient and is drawing more specific things by using his imagination.”

 

See more at: http://www.schoolnewsnetwork.org/index.php/2016-17/banking-better-parenting/#sthash.e7p1o24S.dpuf

Custodial Job Perk: Connecting with Students

By Erin Albanese  

School News Network

 

In a world where too many people just “talk the talk,” Fred Cox “walks the walk” — a fast stride around the cafeteria, through entryways, down hallways, in classrooms and outside on snowy sidewalks.

 

While keeping his speedy stride, Cox cleans: picking up trash, wiping tables and shoveling foot-deep snow on winter days. The custodian, called Fred by students and teachers alike at Duncan Lake Middle School, spends school days from 5:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. taking care of the large building that enrolls about 500 sixth- through eighth-graders.

 

Cox’s quickness shows during the three lunch periods when students enter the cafeteria en masse, complete with the quirks and antics of middle schoolers. On a recent morning, one student needs Cox to retrieve 50 cents from the trashcan; Cox uses a broom handle to fix a handful of drop ceiling tiles knocked off center by wayward balls; a group of boys starts a dice game to win pencils provided by Cox; and several more ask his help with one thing or another.


All in a Day’s Work

“How was your snow day, Fred?” seventh-grader Jack Simons asks during lunch on a Tuesday following a Monday when schools closed because of snow.

 

“It was fantastic,” Cox answers without a hint of sarcasm. “I spent four hours clearing snow from all around the school exits.”

 

Cox handles the rambunctious crew with ease, moving seamlessly from sixth- to seventh- to eighth-grade lunch periods, passing out high fives and fist bumps, engaging in conversations and sharing laughs. And his way of connecting with them has caught the attention of staff and students.

 

“The kids are great,” said Cox, who started this year as full-time custodian after working part-time at Caledonia High School since 2007. “I’m blessed every day, because if you can’t come here and smile, something is definitely wrong.”

 

Sixth-grader Ethan Dyksterhouse grabs a rag and helps Cox wipe tables after lunch. “Most kids get to know him,” Ethan said. “He’s always positive, giving high fives and having fun.”

 

Cox worked as an assistant manager at Steelcase for 15 years and then at other companies, doing building and grounds and custodial work. His daughter, Samantha Cox, and late stepson, David Marlink, graduated from Caledonia High School.

 

At school he’s known for his ability to do custodial and maintenance work, for which Principal Ryan Graham said he’s very grateful.

Custodian Fred Cox takes time to get to know students while he works

 

“Kids and staff see his hard work ethic. When he sets out to do things, he’s on it,” Graham said. “He works his tail off.”

 

But more than that, it’s the way students gravitate to Cox that people notice. “Kids who aren’t the jocks or ‘all A’ kids, they respond to Fred,” Graham said.

 

Cox fixes what’s broken, helps students open jammed lockers, hangs banners, shovels and cleans. He said he works hard to meet the needs of staff and students with “whatever they need me to do.”

 

His manner is humble. “I try to do everything, jack-of-all-trades master of none…” he said with a laugh.

 

Food service worker Lori Hoholik said she sees how students light up around Cox.

 

“I love watching Fred and the way he interacts with kids,” she said. “He’s so good with them. He talks to them. If he sees a kid sitting alone, he goes up to them. He’s always upbeat.”

 

Little Things

Students note the small ways Cox helps brighten their day. “He gave me M&Ms,” said seventh-grader Kaitlynn Robotham. “I spilled my whole lunch and Fred cleaned it up.”

 

Added seventh-grader Reagan Weiss: “Once I lost my lunchbox and all the food in it. He bought me a lunch, found my lunchbox and washed it out.”

 

“He always waves at us in the hallway,” said seventh-grader Lindy Bujak.

 

Cox treats students with respect and they seem to like that. He calls them “sir” or “young lady.” “He’s very polite,” said seventh-grader Colin Marckwardt. “He talks openly to kids and that’s really cool about him.”

 

Graham said the respect is mutual. Students make sure they don’t take advantage of their beloved custodian who works so hard.

 

“They remind each other, ‘Don’t make a mess for Fred!’ ” Graham said.

 

See more here.

Calvin’s January Series features historian, trekkers, religious sojourner

Justin Skeesuck and Patrick Gray will share their story of trekking and service to other as part of the Calvin College January Series.. (Supplied)

By K.D. Norris

ken@wktv.org

 

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Doris Kearns Godwin may be the most well-known name on the program for Calvin College’s January Series, the annual series of speakers and discussions on topics great and intimate.

 

Doris Kearns Goodwin

But some lesser-known speakers — such as Eugene Cho,  Lisa Sharon Harper, and the joint lecture by Justin Skeesuck and Patrick Gray — may well provide inspiration and challenge as much as information.

 

“I think Eugene Cho is great to have on the series,” Kristi Potter, director of the January Series, said in supplied material. “So often we talk about how we can make a difference, but are we actually doing it? … Cho will hold us accountable to take those steps to make a difference. In his book, he asks questions like ‘Are we in love with the idea of changing the world or actually changing the world?’ and ‘Do we just write a check or do we change our lifestyle to help change the world?’”

 

The January Series runs noontime January 4-24 and includes 15 speakers discussing topics ranging from systemic racism in America, the gender gap in technology, healthcare delivery and the cycle of poverty. Cho’s talk will be Jan. 18.

People with stories to tell

 

Cho is the founder and pastor of Quest Church, an urban, multicultural, multigenerational church in Seattle known for tackling societal issues head-on. Harper is an social advocate and, quite literally, a Sojourner. Skeesuck and Gray are friends who share a bond of adventure and service to other.

 

Skeesuck and Gray have shared a lifelong friendship, full of many adventures, including their 500-mile trek across Spain. But their story is much more than simply friendly adventuring. Skeesuck has a progressive neuromuscular disease and travels with a wheelchair. Together, the pair trekked the Camino de Santiago, or the Way of St. James, and detailed their adventures in the film and educational project “I’ll Push You”.

 

The pair, according to supplied information, live by the mantra that “Life is not defined by its limitations, it is defined by what is accomplished in spite of those limitations.” Their talk will be Jan. 12.

 

Lisa Sharon Harper

Harper, who will talk Jan. 16, works with Sojourners, a group started in the 1970s in Washington, D.C., that has grown and transformed to now have the goal to “inspire hope and build a movement to transform individuals, communities, the church, and the world.” Harper’s faith-rooted approach to advocacy and organizing has activated people across the U.S. and around the world to address structural and political injustice as an outward demonstration of their personal faith.

 

Other speakers include Gary Haugen, CEO and founder of International Justice Mission; Mark Desmond, co-founder of the Justice and Poverty Project and the recipient of a MacArthur “Genius Grant”; violinist Taylor Davis, whose passion for gaming and film music has made her one of the fastest rising stars in the digital world with 1 million subscribers on her YouTube channel; and N.T. Wright, a world-renowned New Testament Scholar, who is back on the January Series stage for the fifth time.

 

 

Wright’s talk is also the Stob Lecture, an annual lecture co-sponsored by Calvin College and Calvin Theological Seminary in honor of philosophy professor emeritus Dr. Henry J. Stob. Wright will also be a featured speaker at the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship’s Symposium on Worship in late January.

 

 

The January Series runs from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, various days, in the Covenant Fine Arts Center on Calvin’s campus. Parts of the series will also via live video in 50 cities in the United States, Canada and Europe. In 2016, 45,000 people attended between the on-campus and remote sites, according to supplied material.

For more information visit calvin.edu/january-series/

Government Matters: Kentwood resident nominated to military academy

WKTV Staff

 

WKTV’s Government Matters lists a sampling of news released by state and federal officials who represent the Wyoming and Kentwood areas. Among this week’s highlights are Sen. Stabenow nominating 45 students to the military academies and Sen. Peters voicing support for veterans as part of a new Department of Defense bill.

 

Sen. Stabenow nominates Kentwood student among 45 total in state to military academies
Sen. Debbie Stabenow recently announced her office’s nominations of local students for the service academies. (Supplied)

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow announced recently the nomination of 45 Michigan students for placement at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York.

 

Among those nominated, according to supplied material, were Jarrod Torr, of Kentwood, to the Naval Academy, as well as Grandville’s Luke Ensing and Connor Fischer, both to the West Point.

 

“Michigan is fortunate to have so many exceptional students who want to serve our country through military service,” Sen. Stabenow said in supplied material. “Having demonstrated a strong commitment to excellence in and out of the classroom, I am confident they will represent Michigan and our country well.”

 

Students seeking appointment to a service academy must first obtain the nomination of their U.S. Senator, their U.S. Representative, or the Vice President. Students nominated went through a highly competitive application process that included interviews by community leaders. Now that the students have been nominated, they must await acceptance for admission by the academy to which they have applied.

 

Sen. Peters supports defense bill with provisions for state’s veterans
Sen. Gary Peters

On Dec. 8, U.S. Sen. Gary Peters, a former Lt. Commander  in the U.SA. Navy Reserve, helped pass a defense bill which advocates for a pay raise for service members, supports veterans suffering from mental trauma, and advocates for Michigan’s manufacturers and small businesses, according to a press release from the senator’s office.

 

The National Defense Authorization Act, which sets policy for the Department of Defense for fiscal year 2017, passed the House of Representatives, the senate and was then sent to the desk of President Barack Obama for signature.

 

Among other things, the bill included a 2.1 percent pay raise for service members and, according to supplied information, provides “the necessary tools and resources for our military while ensuring those suffering from the invisible wounds have the support they need after their service,” Sen. Peters said.

 

A provision helps veterans who may have been erroneously given a less than honorable discharge due to behavior resulting from metal traumas including PTSD. The Fairness for Veterans provision gives liberal consideration to petitions for changes in discharge status to honorable if the service member has been diagnosed with PTSD, TBI or related conditions in connection with their military service. A less than honorable discharge prevents veterans from accessing Post-9/11 GI Bill opportunities, VA home loans and other benefits. Michigan is home to more than 600,000 veterans, including 50,000 post-9/11 veterans.

 

Another part of the legislation requires the DoD provide American-made athletic footwear to new military recruits. DoD already applies this policy to uniforms and combat boots, but not athletic footwear. This legislation could boost manufacturers like Wolverine Worldwide with offices in Rockford, which produces Saucony athletic shoes and is a major manufacturer of footwear for the U.S. military.

 

New Wyoming District School Board member envisions greater community connection

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-11-00-46-amBy Victoria Mullen

WKTV

 

Jessica Hanselman is excited about her new position on the Wyoming District School Board and said she is ready to take on the challenges facing the district.

 

Hanselman won one of two open seats on the Board Nov. 8 with 4,640 votes. Incumbent Lisa Manley received 5,016 votes.

 

“My vision includes a greater connection between the Wyoming Public School District and the larger community, to build community pride and increase involvement in district initiatives and activities,” said Hanselman.

 

Hanselman wants the district to raise its public profile and publicize its successes more broadly, so that the community gets the opportunity to know the district’s achievements and best practices. She also wants to cultivate community relationships between the education community and human services community, including mental health organizations.

 

“Often, public entities operate in silos, for many reasons,” she said. “However, I believe students served in the schools would benefit from streamlined communication and the sharing of best practices and  resources, wherever possible. It will take me a bit of time to determine whether there are any pressing concerns or problems, but I am happy to work with the rest of the board to help with any issues that arise.”

 

She said that many of the challenges faced by all districts, including Wyoming Public Schools, is the continued failure at the state level to fund education at the level it deserves, and new mandates handed down by the Michigan House of Representatives that are often unhelpful, uninformed and may create unnecessary barriers for educators to do what they know best.

 

“As necessary, I am willing to be a voice for the district with our state legislators, and partner with other districts who are seeking to advocate for their students at the government level.

 

“Wyoming Public Schools is worthy of being a sought out education destination for our community, and I want parents to know why WPS is a highly desirable school home for their children.”

Join the discussion: ‘Family & Film’ Dec. 5

gr-childrens-museum-family-filmGrand Rapids Children’s Museum, 11 Sheldon Ave. NE in Grand Rapids, hosts Family & Film, Monday, Dec. 5 at 6 pm.

 

Grand Valley State University (GVSU) senior capstone students present their thesis assignments focusing on how films impact children in matters of healing, coping with illness or understanding their world.

 

The moderator is therapist Ms. Janna Buskirk, who utilizes cinema therapy with her child patients.

There will be plenty of time for questions and reflections.

Re-created music videos help Godfrey-Lee students hone production skills

By Erin Albanese, School News Network

 

You can “Jump!” in teacher Jeff Patin’s introduction to video production class, or “Walk like an Egyptian,” or go “Dancing in the Dark.”

 

As part of the class, ninth- through 12th-grade students harked back to the “I want my MTV” decade by creating music videos as they existed when the craft started out. While practicing camera shots, angles and movements, they also learned a little about totally ’80s hair bands and the corny lyrics teenagers rocked to three decades ago.

 

senior-aracely-quinones-records-with-senior-miguel-lemus
Godfrey-Lee High School Senior Aracely Quinones records with senior Miguel Lemus

Patin said the project was a way to practice and showcase their video production skills — and, to some extent, entertain him and other Godfrey-Lee Public Schools staff members who remember the decade well. The students recently presented their finished videos to the Board of Education.

 

“It’s different,” said senior Humberto Gallarzo, about the music from Patin’s generation. Humberto helped produce the video, “Oh Sherrie” by Steve Perry.

 

Why the ’80s? “That’s my decade,” Patin joked. “Why do something really cinematic when you can do something really cheesy?”

 

Students are unfamiliar with the songs, he said, and have to take time learning the lyrics. “I chose the ’80s because verbally they are safe (not explicit) and it puts everybody on the same playing field because they don’t know the songs,” Patin explained.

 

New Tech for Retro Remakes

Unlike in the ’80s, students in the class make their videos with their smart phones and use the Apple program iMovie for editing. The results are shot-for-shot remakes of some of the most memorable songs from 30 years ago, from jumping like Eddie Van Halen to crooning like Rick Springfield over “Jessie’s Girl.” In editing, the original video appeared in the corner of students’ remakes to show how closely they match. “It was hard to stay serious,” said senior Aracely Quinones, who served as camera operator for the “Oh, Sherrie” video.

 

students-rock-out-to-steve-perry“It’s fun and you’re learning at the same time,” said senior Johnny Lopez, who edited the video. “It gets people out of their comfort zone.”

 

Because of the music video and other projects in the class, students said they now watch TV and movies in a new way, paying attention to the angles, framing, movements and other elements.’

 

“I can’t watch a simple show without thinking about this class,” said senior Miguel Lemus.